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Hubble:Hubble unveils a colourful view of the Universe

June 4, 2014 9:13 am | by European Space Agency | News | Comments

Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have captured the most comprehensive picture ever assembled of the evolving Universe – and one of the most colourful. The study is called the Ultraviolet Coverage of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UVUDF) project.

Photos of the Day: Solar Impulse 2 takes flight

June 3, 2014 3:57 pm | by Solar Impulse | Blogs | Comments

Solar Impulse 2, a.k.a. the "Round-the-World" solar airplane, is a single-seater airplane made from carbon fiber with 17,000 solar cells that supple four electric 17.5 CV (each) with energy. Those solar cells recharge the lithium batteries that allow the plane to fly at night.

NASA snaps cosmic color portrait 'and then some'

June 3, 2014 3:14 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The Hubble Space Telescope has captured our cosmos at its most colorful. A new NASA panorama looking deep and far into the universe for the first time includes ultraviolet light, which is normally not visible to the human eye. It shows up in the photo as bright baby blue with spinning galaxies, which are about 5 to 10 billion years old, not too old or young in cosmic terms.

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Optocoupler tested and certified for harsh environments

June 3, 2014 11:15 am | Product Releases | Comments

Standex-Meder Electronics (Cincinnati, Ohio) announces a new ATEX optocoupler for intrinsically safe circuits. The optocoupler series are tested and certified for extreme/harsh environments such as potentially explosive atmospheres so they will not become an ignition point when subjected to short circuits or adjacent component failures.

Photos of the Day: ISEE-3 Reboot project breathes life into 1978 NASA mission

June 2, 2014 3:24 pm | by ECN Staff | Blogs | Comments

The ISEE-3 Reboot project has brought together a group of civilians and engineers from NASA with the joint goal of rebooting the original 1978 mission of the explorer. The spacecraft was launched on August 12, 1978 as one of three crafts designed to study Earth's magnetic field and the solar wind. It was the first craft to visit a comet, passing within 7,800 km of the nucleus of Comet Giacobini-Zinner.

NASA to test giant Mars parachute on Earth

June 2, 2014 10:48 am | by ALICIA CHANG, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The skies off the Hawaiian island of Kauai will be a stand-in for Mars as NASA prepares to launch a saucer-shaped vehicle in an experimental flight designed to land heavy loads on the red planet. For decades, robotic landers and rovers have hitched a ride to Earth's planetary neighbor using the same parachute design. But NASA needs a bigger and stronger parachute if it wants to send astronauts there.

Precision Guidance: Company developing autonomous Black Hawk helicopter

June 2, 2014 9:23 am | by Jon Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

One of the biggest announcements from the recent Unmanned Systems expo in Orlando, Florida was the news that Sikorsky Aircraft is developing an autonomous version of the Black Hawk helicopter. The optionally piloted UH-60A Black Hawk leverages the company’s Matrix technology — a major research program for vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft....

Two GOES-R instruments complete spacecraft integration

May 30, 2014 2:30 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Two of the six instruments that will fly on NOAA's first Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite - R (GOES-R) satellite have completed integration with the spacecraft. The Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) and Extreme Ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensors (EXIS) were installed on the sun-pointing platform....

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Using thoughts to control airplanes

May 30, 2014 11:37 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The pilot is wearing a white cap with myriad attached cables. His gaze is concentrated on the runway ahead of him. All of a sudden the control stick starts to move, as if by magic. The airplane banks and then approaches straight on towards the runway. The position of the plane is corrected time and again....

Aircraft wings that change their shape in flight can help to protect the environment

May 30, 2014 10:55 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A top priority for any airline is to conserve as much fuel as possible – and this helps to protect the environment. The EU project SARISTU aims to reduce kerosene consumption by six percent, and integrating flexible landing devices into aircraft wings is one step towards that target....

Mars spacecraft research lands Exeter student top international fellowship

May 30, 2014 10:46 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

An Exeter student has been honoured with a prestigious international award, designed to promote female excellence in the pioneering sphere of aerospace research. Anusha Mujumdar has been selected to receive a Zonta International Amelia Earhart Fellowship – one of only 35 students worldwide to be bestowed with the coveted award....

Waveguide duplexer with ceramic filter technology rivals air-cavity devices

May 30, 2014 9:37 am | Product Releases | Comments

CTS Corporation (Elkhart, IN) through its subsidiary, CTS Electronic Components, Inc., announces its new ClearPlex Waveguide Duplexer, delivering performance comparable to air-cavity with 2x to 4x smaller size, according to the company, for cellular infrastructure, 6-10 GHz microwave, NLOS backhaul and military communications.

CubeSats keep space research motoring

May 30, 2014 9:33 am | by Chris Warner, Executive Editor | Articles | Comments

Space research isn’t just for the big space agencies anymore. In fact, anyone wishing to make observations from space should not only think small but also inside-the-box. Or more accurately, inside the cube. That’s because in recent years academia has been creating and deploying very small satellites called CubeSats....

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Engineering Newswire: Super-maglev train to reach 1,800 mph

May 30, 2014 9:17 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

Magnetic levitation, or Maglev, trains use magnets to levitate above their tracks, which eliminates any friction, allowing for faster, quieter travel. Current maglev trains can reach speeds of up to 250 mph, but Researchers in China have successfully completed testing of the first manned megathermal superconducting maglev loop, which would go much faster....

Engineering Update 60: The most secure drone in the world

May 29, 2014 1:21 pm | by Jon Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

DARPA has been developing a program called High Assurance Cyber Military Systems, which uses software to thwart all manner of cyber-attacks on drones. The project originated at the University of California, San Diego and the University of Washington, and according to the program manager for DARPA, the software is allegedly mathematically invulnerable to large classes of attack....

New crew launches to Space Station to continue scientific research

May 28, 2014 6:14 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Three crew members representing the United States, Russia and Germany are on their six-hour journey to the International Space Station after launching from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan at 3:57 p.m. EDT Wednesday (1:57 a.m. Thursday in Baikonur)....

May the force (shoes) be with you

May 28, 2014 3:51 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Maintaining astronaut bone and muscle health in microgravity is an ongoing concern for NASA, and now the agency is "forcing" the issue with a new investigation. On May 29, 2014, NASA will fly the ForceShoe, designed by XSENS, to the International Space Station....

Water in moon rocks provides clues and questions about lunar history

May 28, 2014 10:45 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A recent review of hundreds of chemical analyses of Moon rocks indicates that the amount of water in the Moon's interior varies regionally – revealing clues about how water originated and was redistributed in the Moon. These discoveries provide a new tool to unravel the processes involved in the formation of the Moon....

Photos of the Day: An Iron Man suit for U.S. Special Forces

May 27, 2014 3:05 pm | by ECN Staff | News | Comments

Taking a cue from comic books, the U.S. military has been developing an exoskeleton that looks suspiciously like Iron Man. The armor is known as the Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit (TALOS), and the team is supposedly turning to professional engineers, students, and even, what they described as local "garage tinkerers" for help....

Aircraft fuel consumption can be reduced by 15 percent

May 27, 2014 2:16 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Two aircraft engine concepts, geared turbofan and open rotor, can enable a significant reduction to aircraft fuel consumption. With open rotor, the potential reduction is 15 per cent. These are the findings of Linda Larsson at Chalmers University of Technology, who has analysed and evaluated the two concepts....

Students 'blast off' after space program saved

May 27, 2014 9:08 am | by KATHY MATHESON, Associated Press | News | Comments

In recent years, students at Northeast High School have virtually saved mankind from a meteor, discovered water on Mars and repaired the International Space Station. But their current mission to establish a habitat on the moon was nearly aborted because of education budget cuts....

Engineering Newswire: Iron Man suit designed for U.S. Special Forces

May 27, 2014 8:39 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

Special Ops Iron Man Suit: The Tactical Assault Light Operator Suit project is being coordinated through the Special Operations Command headquarters, but the team is turning to professional engineers, students, and even, what they described as local "garage tinkerers"....

Small chassis contains four complete systems

May 27, 2014 8:11 am | General Micro Systems | Product Releases | Comments

General Micro Systems, Inc. (Rancho Cucamonga, CA) has introduced a conduction-cooled, fully ruggedized, Secure Virtual Machine (SVM) server with six hardware independent I/O modules. Designed to replace multiple workstations using virtual machine technology…

How is rapid prototyping affecting engineering?

May 27, 2014 6:30 am | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor | Blogs | Comments

We have a VERY exciting Brainstorm about Rapid Prototyping for our July issue. Nothing has the potential to change the landscape of design engineering (and every other industry) like rapid prototyping. Now that the technology is rapidly gaining traction, we want to know how it’s really affecting your job or life.

MLCCs are rated for 250 deg C

May 23, 2014 12:07 pm | Avx Corporation | Product Releases | Comments

AVX Corporation (Greenville, SC) introduced a new series of high temperature MLCCs rated for 250°C. Designed to accommodate the rapidly emerging military and commercial market demands for capacitors capable of high-reliability, long lifetime performance at operating temperatures in excess of…

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