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Photos of the Day: Inside the Space Station's Destiny Laboratory

June 12, 2014 1:42 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

This view in the International Space Station, photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member, shows how it looks inside the space station while the crew is asleep. The dots near the hatch point to a Soyuz spacecraft docked to the station in case the crew was to encounter an emergency....

Engineering Update #62: The first commercial drone

June 12, 2014 11:20 am | by Jon Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

Recently, the Federal Aviation Administration approved the first commercial drone, AeroVironment'S RQ-20A Puma AE, a small hand-launched UAS with endurance of 3.5 hours and the capability to extend its range with solar or fuel cell options. It also includes electro-optical and infrared cameras....

Map of universe questioned; dwarf galaxies don't fit standard model

June 11, 2014 2:17 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Dwarf galaxies that orbit the Milky Way and the Andromeda galaxies defy the accepted model of galaxy formation, and recent attempts to wedge them into the model are flawed, reports an international team of astrophysicists. David Merritt, professor of astrophysics at Rochester Institute of Technology ...

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Countries agree on stealth technology deal

June 11, 2014 1:46 pm | by Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press | News | Comments

Japan and Australia agreed Wednesday to jointly develop stealth submarine technology, as Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe pushes his country toward a more assertive global military role.The submarine technology was a top item at talks among the nations' foreign and defense ministers....

High-density card edge connectors are offered in low profile, ultra-thin, and high temperature versions

June 11, 2014 11:43 am | Sullins Connector Solutions | Product Releases | Comments

Sullins Connector Solutions, Inc. (San Marcos, CA) announced the expansion of their portfolio of high-density 0.050" (1.27 mm) contact center card edge connectors to include the FMBx Series. The new series features high-temperature and low profile ultra-thin devices accommodating…

This is what the terminator line looks like from the ISS

June 9, 2014 10:27 am | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor | Blogs | Comments

NASA has been very into social media lately, and I could not be more excited. It’s a great way to inspire younger generations and remind everyone why the space program—despite its not insignificant costs—is so important. NASA has been capitalizing on the “space is cool again” trend...

Engineering Newswire 93: Jet-powered flying car reaches 550 mph

June 9, 2014 10:05 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

In other automotive news this week, Greg Brown and Dave Fawcett have announced plans for a jet-powered flying car, the GF7, and in a recent interview with Gizmag, the team explained that the vehicle will be able to reach heights of up to 38,000 feet, with a top speed of 550 mph....

Has solar activity influenced Earth's global warming?

June 6, 2014 12:24 pm | by Science China Press | News | Comments

A recent study demonstrates the existence of significant resonance cycles and high correlations between solar activity and the Earth's averaged surface temperature during centuries. This provides a new clue to reveal the phenomenon of global warming in recent years.

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New isotopic evidence supporting moon formation via Earth collision with planet-sized body

June 6, 2014 12:22 pm | by European Association of Geochemistry | News | Comments

A new series of measurements of oxygen isotopes provides increasing evidence that the Moon formed from the collision of the Earth with another large, planet-sized astronomical body, around 4.5 billion years ago. This work will be published in Science on 6th June, and will be presented to the Goldschmidt geochemistry conference in California on 11th June.

Are black holes turbulent?

June 6, 2014 12:21 pm | by Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics | News | Comments

Fasten your seatbelts – gravity is about to get bumpy. Of course, if you’re flying in the vicinity of a black hole, a bit of extra bumpiness is the least of your worries. But it’s still surprising. The accepted wisdom among gravitational researchers has been that spacetime cannot become turbulent. New research from Perimeter, though, shows that the accepted wisdom might be wrong.

Engine maker: CSeries could fly again soon

June 6, 2014 12:15 pm | News | Comments

Bombardier's CSeries planes could resume flight testing in a few weeks after the plane's engine manufacturer believes it has found the cause of an incident a week ago that grounded the four test aircraft. "We believe it is not going to have a significant impact on the testing schedule and we're working now with Bombardier on a plan to resume testing here in the next few weeks, we hope"....

German spy agency comes clean

June 6, 2014 12:14 pm | by Frank Jordans, Associated Press | News | Comments

Germany's foreign intelligence agency officially lifted the lid on some of its worst-kept secrets Friday, acknowledging that half a dozen facilities around the country are in fact spy stations — as anyone with Internet access could already figure out.

Photos of the Day: GE's WWII high-altitude flying suit

June 6, 2014 11:49 am | by GE Reports | News | Comments

GE developed a life-size dummy called the Copper Man to spare human volunteers of discomfort when testing the suit’s extremes. The dummy was 5 feet and 10 and a half inches tall, and covered with copper skin one-sixteenth inch thick. Its head, hands, torso and feet were connected by an electrical mesh that could take readings from 15 different body areas.

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Moon rocks indicate Earth's orb born of collision

June 6, 2014 9:27 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A new study strengthens the notion that our moon was created by a collision between Earth and a planet-sized object some 4.5 billion years ago. German scientists studied moon rocks gathered by astronauts nearly a half-century ago in the Apollo 11, 12 and 16 missions. They analyzed various kinds of oxygen atoms and found the moon rocks have a different makeup than Earth rocks do.

Removing the barriers to successful autonomous unmanned aircraft

June 5, 2014 12:14 pm | by National Academy of Sciences | News | Comments

While civil aviation is on the threshold of potentially revolutionary changes with the emergence of increasingly autonomous unmanned aircraft, these new systems pose serious questions about how they will be safely and efficiently integrated into the existing civil aviation structure, says a new report from the National Research Council. The report identifies key barriers and provides...

Engineering Update #61: A planet that shouldn’t exist

June 5, 2014 9:51 am | by Jon Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

Announced at a press conference at meeting of the American Astronomical society, was the discovery of a planet that is 17-times heavier than earth called Kepler-10c. The planet exists in the Draco constellation, about 560 light-years from earth. The latest smart phone security: If someone does something suspicious with a phone...

Drones give farmers an eye in the sky to check on crop progress

June 5, 2014 9:21 am | by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign | News | Comments

This growing season, crop researchers at the University of Illinois are experimenting with the use of drones – unmanned aerial vehicles – on the university's South Farms. Dennis Bowman, a crop sciences educator with U. of I. Extension, is using two drones to take aerial pictures of crops growing in research plots on the farms. 

U.S. hottest spots of warming: Northeast, Southwest

June 5, 2014 9:09 am | by SETH BORENSTEIN AP SCIENCE WRITER | News | Comments

The United States is warming fastest at two of its corners, in the Northeast and the Southwest, an analysis of federal temperature records shows. Northeastern states - led by Maine and Vermont - have gotten the hottest in the last 30 years in annual temperature, gaining 2.5 degrees on average. But Southwestern states have heated up the most in the hottest months...

U.S. General says S. Korea databases hacked

June 5, 2014 9:06 am | by YOUKYUNG LEE AP TECHNOLOGY WRITER | News | Comments

The top U.S. military official in South Korea said a hacking incident might have compromised the personal information of thousands of South Koreans employed by the American command. Gen. Curtis M. Scaparrotti, commander of U.S. Forces in South Korea, apologized Thursday for the "possible theft" from two databases of private details of South Koreans such as names, contact information and work history.

This technology can hack your car from 1500 miles away

June 4, 2014 5:15 pm | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor | Blogs | Comments

Automotive security is odd in that it’s basically nonexistent. We drive around every day in giant, metal contraptions completely controlled by a central computer (more or less) and that computer is essentially open to whoever is bored (or mad) enough to hack it.

Connecters designed for military, harsh environment

June 4, 2014 2:42 pm | Omnetics Connector Corporation | Product Releases | Comments

Omnetics Connector Corporation (Minneapolis, MN) announces its new line of Metal Nano-Connectors, which are high-density, multi-position connectors made with break-away or threaded metal housings for a positive lock and environmental seal.

Photos of the Day: This flying car will hit the sky in 2016

June 4, 2014 12:47 pm | News | Comments

Terrafugia, a company whose name comes from the latin for "Escape the Earth," has been developing a street-legal airplane. If you'll stop to think for a minute, a street-legal airplane is a flying car. This company is making a flying car. They've promised it will hit the market in 2016. The first prototype the company offered was called The Transition, which runs on premium unleaded automotive gas.

Counterfeit sub parts raise national security concerns

June 4, 2014 11:50 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A Massachusetts man has pleaded guilty to shipping potentially dangerous counterfeit semiconductors to the U.S. Navy base in Connecticut for use in nuclear submarines. Peter Picone, of Methuen, Massachusetts, took a plea deal Tuesday in federal court in Hartford. He faces up to 46 months in prison when he is sentenced Aug. 22.

Black hole ‘batteries’ keep blazars going and going

June 4, 2014 11:32 am | by NASA | News | Comments

Astronomers studying two classes of black-hole-powered galaxies monitored by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have found evidence that they represent different sides of the same cosmic coin. By unraveling how these objects, called blazars, are distributed throughout the universe, the scientists suggest that apparently distinctive properties defining each class more...

Man gets 3 months for smuggling dinosaur skeleton

June 4, 2014 9:14 am | by LARRY NEUMEISTER, The Associated Press | News | Comments

NEW YORK (AP) — A Virginia fossils dealer was sentenced Tuesday to three months in prison even after a prosecutor described his cooperation with law enforcement in heroic terms, saying he enabled more than 18 largely complete dinosaur fossils to be located, enough for Mongolia to open its first dinosaur museum.

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