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Observing the onset of a magnetic substorm

September 2, 2014 12:55 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Magnetic substorms, the disruptions in geomagnetic activity that cause brightening of aurora, may sometimes be driven by a different process than generally thought, a new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics shows....

Reducing water scarcity possible by 2050

September 2, 2014 12:51 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Water scarcity is not a problem just for the developing world. In California, legislators are currently proposing a $7.5 billion emergency water plan to their voters; and U.S. federal officials last year warned residents of Arizona and Nevada that they could face cuts in Colorado River water deliveries in 2016....

Why sibling stars look alike: Early, fast mixing in star-birth clouds

September 2, 2014 12:30 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Stars are made mostly of hydrogen and helium, but they also contain trace amounts of other elements, such as carbon, oxygen, iron, and even more exotic substances. By carefully measuring the wavelengths (colors) of light coming from a star, astronomers can determine how abundant each of these trace elements is....

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Researchers awarded $1.5 million to develop software to process solar astronomy data on larger scale

September 2, 2014 11:43 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Researchers in Georgia State University's new Astroinformatics program have been awarded $1.5 million from the National Science Foundation to develop software tools that can process large sets of solar astronomy data and allow scientists to perform analyses on scales and detail levels that have not been possible....

Fly in the cockpit of the Blue Angels

September 2, 2014 8:35 am | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor | Blogs | Comments

The Blue Angels are basically the cream of the crop of stunt pilots from the US Navy and Marine Corps. They are an exhibition team that participate in airshows all over the place and showcase the intense skills required to fly a jet. There are a total of 16 officers on the team at any time with three tactical jet pilots...

Engineering Update #73: A "smart skin" for planes

August 28, 2014 9:31 am | by Jon Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

BAE systems has come up with a solution for monitoring planes by introducing their new “smart skin” concept. The idea is that the plane would be covered with sensors of different sizes ranging from a grain of rice to less than 1 millimeter squared....

NASA's TRMM Satellite sees powerful towering storms in Cristobal

August 28, 2014 9:18 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

NASA's TRMM satellite identified areas of heavy rainfall occurring in Hurricane Cristobal as it continued strengthening on approach to Bermuda. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite flew above Hurricane Cristobal on August 26 at 11:35 UTC (7:35 a.m. EDT) gathering rainfall data....

Chassis and modules are compliant to MicroTCA.1 spec for air-cooled rugged applications

August 28, 2014 8:58 am | Vadatech, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

VadaTech (Henderson, NV) offers chassis and modules that are compliant to the MicroTCA.1 specification for air-cooled rugged applications. The MicroTCA.1 specification uses ...

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NASA begins hurricane mission with Global Hawk flight to Cristobal

August 28, 2014 8:57 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The first of two unmanned Global Hawk aircraft landed at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Virginia, on Aug. 27 after surveying Hurricane Cristobal for the first science flight of NASA's latest hurricane airborne mission. NASA's airborne Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel, or HS3, mission returns to NASA Wallops for the third year to investigate the processes that underlie hurricane formation and intensity change....

Lockheed Martin designs the superhuman workers of tomorrow

August 28, 2014 8:35 am | by Jon Minnick, Associate Editor, Manufacturing Business Technology | Blogs | Comments

In the latest news of life imitating art, it seems that an exoskeleton suit similar to ones used in Tom Cruise’s summer movie Edge of Tomorrow may be here today.A press release from Lockheed Martin indicates that the U.S. Navy will begin testing and evaluating two FORTIS industrial exoskeletons....

Water 'thermostat' could help engineer drought-resistant crops

August 27, 2014 3:51 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Duke University researchers have identified a gene that could help scientists engineer drought-resistant crops. The gene, called OSCA1, encodes a protein in the cell membrane of plants that senses changes in water availability and adjusts the plant's water conservation machinery accordingly....

When blinding someone with a laser is better than killing them

August 27, 2014 2:57 pm | by Jason Lomberg, Digital Editor | Blogs | Comments

Sometimes, it’s better to shine a bright light in someone’s face than riddle them with bullets (shocking, I know). And for troops in a warzone following very specific Escalation of Force (EOF) procedures, not killing someone is always the best possible outcome....

Detecting neutrinos, physicists look into the heart of the sun

August 27, 2014 2:31 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Using one of the most sensitive neutrino detectors on the planet, an international team of physicists including Andrea Pocar, Laura Cadonati and doctoral student Keith Otis at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report in the current issue of Nature that for the first time they have directly detected neutrinos created by the "keystone" proton-proton (pp) fusion process going on at the sun's core....

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Scientist uncovers red planet's climate history in unique meteorite

August 27, 2014 2:21 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Was Mars — now a cold, dry place — once a warm, wet planet that sustained life? And if so, how long has it been cold and dry? Research underway at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory may one day answer those questions — and perhaps even help pave the way for future colonization of the Red Planet....

Witnessing the early growth of a giant

August 27, 2014 2:18 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Elliptical galaxies are large, gas-poor gatherings of older stars and are one of the main types of galaxy along with their spiral and lenticular relatives. Galaxy formation theories suggest that giant elliptical galaxies form from the inside out, with a large core marking the very first stages of formation....

NASA sees massive Marie close enough to affect southern California coast

August 27, 2014 2:03 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Two NASA satellites captured visible and infrared pictures that show the massive size of Hurricane Marie. Marie is so large that it is bringing rough surf to the southern coast of California while almost nine hundred miles west of Baja California....

Happy Camp and July Fire Complexes in California

August 27, 2014 10:46 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

As of seven hours ago the Happy Camp Complex of fires had consumed 24,939 acres of land in Northern California, the July complex had consumed 35,530 as of eight hours ago. Lightning strikes started seventeen fires on the Happy Camp Ranger District of the Klamath National Forest when a thunderstorm passed through the area on August 11, 2014. All but three of those fires are now 100 percent contained....

CWRU astronomers win time on Hubble to study galaxy formation

August 27, 2014 10:28 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Case Western Reserve University astronomer Chris Mihos leads a team of Ohio researchers recently awarded nearly 20 hours of observing time on the Hubble Space Telescope to study the outskirts of the nearby spiral galaxy M101. Access to Hubble is extremely competitive, with only about one in five proposals being awarded observing time and research funding....

Measurement at Big Bang conditions confirms lithium problem

August 27, 2014 10:26 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The field of astrophysics has a stubborn problem and it's called lithium. The quantities of lithium predicted to have resulted from the Big Bang are not actually present in stars. But the calculations are correct – a fact which has now been confirmed for the first time in experiments conducted at the underground laboratory in the Gran Sasso mountain in Italy....

DTU researchers film protein quake for the first time

August 27, 2014 10:21 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

One of nature's mysteries is how plants survive impact by the huge amounts of energy contained in the sun's rays, while using this energy for photosynthesis. The hypothesis is that the light-absorbing proteins in the plant's blades quickly dissipate the energy throughout the entire protein molecule through so-called protein quakes....

Coal's continued dominance must be made more vivid in climate change accounting

August 27, 2014 10:11 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The world's accounting system for carbon emissions, run by the United Nations, disregards capital investments in future coal-fired and natural-gas power plants that will commit the world to several decades and billions of tons of greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new study from Princeton University and the University of California-Irvine published Aug. 26 in the journal Environmental Research Letters....

Are consumers more likely to purchase unintentionally green products?

August 27, 2014 9:56 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A Fortune 500 company is redesigning a popular product using materials that are friendlier to the environment. How will consumers respond to the newly redesigned, "greener" product? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are more likely to purchase a product if they think helping the environment is not the intended purpose of a product improvement....

Museum specimens, modern cities show how an insect pest will respond to climate change

August 27, 2014 9:49 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that century-old museum specimens hold clues to how global climate change will affect a common insect pest that can weaken and kill trees – and the news is not good. "Recent studies found that scale insect populations increase on oak and maple trees in warmer urban areas, which raises the possibility that these pests may also increase with global warming,"....

Satellite shows Hurricane Marie about to swallow Karina

August 27, 2014 9:24 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Massive Hurricane Marie appears like a giant fish about to swallow tiny Tropical Depression Karina on satellite imagery today from NOAA's GOES-West satellite. Karina, now a tropical depression is being swept into Marie's circulation where it is expected to be eaten, or absorbed....

Best view yet of merging galaxies in distant universe

August 27, 2014 9:20 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The famous fictional detective Sherlock Holmes used a magnifying lens to reveal barely visible but important evidence. Astronomers are now combining the power of many telescopes on Earth and in space [1] with a vastly larger form of lens to study a case of vigorous star formation in the early Universe....

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