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Seals take scientists to Antarctic's ocean floor

February 26, 2013 9:11 am | by Pauline Askin, Reuters | News | Comments

Elephant seals wearing head sensors and swimming deep beneath Antarctic ice have helped scientists better understand how the ocean's coldest, deepest waters are formed, providing vital clues to understanding its role in the world's climate.

Chinese hackers seen as increasingly professional, methodical, as they plunder Web for secrets

February 26, 2013 9:09 am | by CHRISTOPHER BODEEN Associated Press | News | Comments

Beijing hotly denies accusations of official involvement in massive cyberattacks against foreign targets, insinuating such activity is the work of rogues. But at least one piece of evidence cited by experts points to professional cyberspies: China's hackers don't work weekends.

Analysis: The near impossible battle against hackers everywhere

February 25, 2013 8:49 am | by Joseph Menn, Reuters | News | Comments

Dire warnings from Washington about a "cyber Pearl Harbor" envision a single surprise strike from a formidable enemy that could destroy power plants nationwide, disable the financial system or cripple the U.S. government. But those on the front lines say it isn't all about protecting U.S. government and corporate networks from a single sudden attack. They report fending off many intrusions at once from perhaps dozens of countries, plus well-funded electronic guerrillas and skilled criminals.

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White House directs open access for government research

February 25, 2013 8:47 am | by Mark Felsenthal, Reuters | News | Comments

The White House has moved to make the results of federally funded research available to the public for free within a year, bowing to public pressure for unfettered access to scholarly articles and other materials produced at taxpayers' expense."Americans should have easy access to the results of research they help support," John Holdren, the director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, wrote on the White House website.

Coaxial Resonator Oscillator features internal proprietary frequency doubler

February 22, 2013 3:23 pm | Crystek Crystal | Product Releases | Comments

Crystek’s new CVCO55CXT-5580-5685 Coaxial Resonator Oscillator (CRO) is a coaxial-based VCO with an internal proprietary frequency doubler. The CVCO55CXT family’s frequency doubling, 2X fundamental technology reaches new performance levels of lower phase noise and much lower harmonics over the competition, while achieving lower current consumption in the process.

India to launch mission to Mars this year, says president

February 22, 2013 12:11 pm | by Reuters | News | Comments

(Reuters) - India will launch its first mission to Mars this year, President Pranab Mukherjee said on Thursday, as the emerging Asian nation looks to play catch up in the global space race alongside the United States, Russia and its giant neighbor China.

"Vulcan" has big lead in bid to name Pluto's newly discovered moons

February 22, 2013 9:03 am | News | Comments

  "Star Trek" star William Shatner and tens of thousands of the show's fans are leading a charge to name one of Pluto's newly discovered moons after the character Spock's home planet. Shatner, who played Captain James T. Kirk on the Starship Enterprise on the program launched in 1966, proposed the name earlier this month in response to an appeal from scientists for help in choosing the names of two newly discovered Pluto moons.  

Inclination sensors provide precise precision control, continuous positioning of rotational movements

February 21, 2013 4:31 pm | Balluff Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Balluff's new liquid-based inclination sensors measure the deviation on a horizontal axis of up to 360°. With an extremely high accuracy of 0.1°C, a resolution of 0.01° and a temperature drift of just 0.01% /10K, they are the ideal choice for solar -thermal power plant and renewable energy applications that require angle measurement or constant rotary monitori

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The micro/nano-satellite revolution

February 21, 2013 9:24 am | Videos | Comments

Craig Underwood of Surrey Space Centre, University of Surrey, gives his talk titled 'The Micro/Nano-Satellite Revolution'. Recorded at NPL on 19 February 2013.

Searching for the solar system's chemical recipe

February 20, 2013 4:12 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

By studying the origins of different isotope ratios among the elements that make up today's smorgasbord of planets, moons, comets, asteroids, and interplanetary ice and dust, Mark Thiemens and his colleagues hope to learn how our solar system evolved.

Kepler spacecraft helps astronomers find tiny planet beyond our solar system

February 20, 2013 4:05 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

An international team of astronomers has used nearly three years of high precision data from NASA's Kepler spacecraft to make the first observations of a planet outside our solar system that's smaller than Mercury, the smallest planet orbiting our sun.

Do drone pilots deserve higher medal than combat vets?

February 20, 2013 3:32 pm | by Jason Lomberg, Technical Editor | Articles | Comments

Since when did waggling a joystick become more valorous than pulling a trigger? It hasn’t, you say? The newly-minted Distinguished Warfare Medal — created to honor cyberwarriors and drone pilots — would rank above the Bronze Star and Purple Heart, and the military community is incensed.

Greater security in the subways

February 20, 2013 8:56 am | by Eurekalert! | News | Comments

Tecnalia is participating in the SECUREMETRO project which is aimed at the development and investigation of protective systems for metro vehicles that can enable us to travel with a greater level of safety in the case of a disastrous event.

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Russian scientists recover meteor fragments

February 19, 2013 8:42 am | by VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists have found more than 50 tiny fragments of a meteor that exploded over Russia's Ural Mountains, and preliminary tests are turning up information about its contents. However, local residents seem more interested in the black market value of the fragments. As they search for their own pieces of the meteor, sales offers already are filling the Internet, and police are warning all purchasers to prepare for possible fraud.

Iranian clown car flies ... with the help of Photoshop

February 14, 2013 11:06 am | by Jason Lomberg, Technical Editor | Blogs | Comments

Take that, free world! For all you naysayers out there who thought Iran’s clown car, er ... stealth fighter ... smelled a bit fishy, the Islamic Republic has the ultimate retort: a badly-Photoshopped image of the Qaher-313 set against stock photo #3.

Pentagon stands by use of lithium-ion batteries on F-35 fighters

February 13, 2013 9:15 am | by Andrea Shalal-Esa, Reuters | News | Comments

The Pentagon said it plans to continue using lithium-ion batteries on the new F-35 fighter jet despite problems with similar batteries that have grounded Boeing Co's new 787 airliner and are causing Airbus to rethink their use on its A350 jet. Joe DellaVedova, spokesman for the Pentagon's $396 billion F-35 program office...

Contest seeks underworldly names for 2 Pluto moons

February 13, 2013 9:11 am | by MARCIA DUNN AP Aerospace Writer | News | Comments

Want to name Pluto's two tiniest moons? Then you'll need to dig deep into mythology. Astronomers announced a contest Monday to name the two itty-bitty moons of Pluto discovered over the past two years. Pluto is the Roman equivalent of the Greek's Hades, lord of the underworld, and its three bigger moons have related mythological names: Charon, the ferryman of Hades; Nix for the night goddess; and the multi-headed monster Hydra.

Earth-observing satellite to launch from Calif.

February 8, 2013 4:30 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

NASA is set to launch a new Earth-observing satellite designed to carry on the tradition of documenting changes to the planet's glaciers, forests and coastlines. Mission managers gave the OK earlier this week to proceed with Monday's launch. The Landsat satellite was scheduled to be lifted into orbit from the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California aboard an Atlas V rocket.

No hype with storm; experts call it the real thing

February 8, 2013 4:28 pm | by Seth Borenstein, The Associated Press | News | Comments

You can call it a snowstorm of historic proportions. You can call it the return of New England's blizzard of 1978. You can call it simply dangerous. And you can even call it Nemo. But don't call it hype. The new director of the National Weather Service says some may be getting carried away in describing the winter storm bearing down on the Northeast. But he says the science is simple and chilling.

Coaxial Resonator Oscillator features internal proprietary frequency double

February 8, 2013 3:18 pm | Crystek Crystal | Product Releases | Comments

Crystek’s new CVCO55CXT-5370-5470 Coaxial Resonator Oscillator (CRO) is a coaxial-based VCO with an internal proprietary frequency doubler. The CVCO55CXT family’s frequency doubling, 2X fundamental technology reaches new performance levels of lower phase noise and much lower harmonics over the competition, while achieving lower current consumption in the process.

150-foot asteroid will buzz Earth, no need to duck

February 8, 2013 9:01 am | by Marcia Dunn, AP Aerospace Reporter | News | Comments

A 150-foot-wide asteroid will come remarkably close to Earth next week, even closer than high-flying communication and weather satellites. It will be the nearest known flyby for an object of this size. But don't worry. Scientists promise the megarock will be at least 17,100 miles away when it zips past next Friday.

NASA scientists build first-ever wide-field X-ray imager

February 7, 2013 2:10 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Three NASA scientists teamed up to develop and demonstrate NASA's first wide-field-of-view soft X-ray camera for studying "charge exchange," a poorly understood phenomenon that occurs when the solar wind collides with Earth's exosphere and neutral gas in interplanetary space.

Engineering Update #3: Watson, Nano Batteries, 3D Chips, and Mission: Impossible Gets Real

February 7, 2013 1:42 pm | Videos | Comments

"Watson," no, not Sherlock's sidekick, but the famous supercomputer who beat the world's best human at Jeopardy, is going back to school. IBM is sending the Watson system to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, so it can improve its "thinking" skills. Because making robots more human always works out just fine.

Iranian "stealth fighter" looks like a clown car

February 7, 2013 11:09 am | by Jason Lomberg, Technical Editor | Blogs | Comments

So it turns out that the new Iranian stealth fighter may be as genuine as the Islamic Republic’s concern for human rights. The regime unveiled the jet, 'Qaher 313', on Saturday, and the blogosphere immediately went to work debunking what could be one of the laziest forgeries of all time.

Closest Earth-like planet 'stroll across park'

February 7, 2013 8:40 am | by MARCIA DUNN AP Aerospace Writer | News | Comments

Earth-like worlds may be closer and more plentiful than anyone imagined. Astronomers reported Wednesday that the nearest Earth-like planet may be just 13 light-years away - or some 77 trillion miles. That planet hasn't been found yet, but should be there based on the team's study of red dwarf stars.

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