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Greater security in the subways

February 20, 2013 8:56 am | by Eurekalert! | News | Comments

Tecnalia is participating in the SECUREMETRO project which is aimed at the development and investigation of protective systems for metro vehicles that can enable us to travel with a greater level of safety in the case of a disastrous event.

Russian scientists recover meteor fragments

February 19, 2013 8:42 am | by VLADIMIR ISACHENKOV Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists have found more than 50 tiny fragments of a meteor that exploded over Russia's Ural Mountains, and preliminary tests are turning up information about its contents. However, local residents seem more interested in the black market value of the fragments. As they search for their own pieces of the meteor, sales offers already are filling the Internet, and police are warning all purchasers to prepare for possible fraud.

Iranian clown car flies ... with the help of Photoshop

February 14, 2013 11:06 am | by Jason Lomberg, Technical Editor | Blogs | Comments

Take that, free world! For all you naysayers out there who thought Iran’s clown car, er ... stealth fighter ... smelled a bit fishy, the Islamic Republic has the ultimate retort: a badly-Photoshopped image of the Qaher-313 set against stock photo #3.

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Pentagon stands by use of lithium-ion batteries on F-35 fighters

February 13, 2013 9:15 am | by Andrea Shalal-Esa, Reuters | News | Comments

The Pentagon said it plans to continue using lithium-ion batteries on the new F-35 fighter jet despite problems with similar batteries that have grounded Boeing Co's new 787 airliner and are causing Airbus to rethink their use on its A350 jet. Joe DellaVedova, spokesman for the Pentagon's $396 billion F-35 program office...

Contest seeks underworldly names for 2 Pluto moons

February 13, 2013 9:11 am | by MARCIA DUNN AP Aerospace Writer | News | Comments

Want to name Pluto's two tiniest moons? Then you'll need to dig deep into mythology. Astronomers announced a contest Monday to name the two itty-bitty moons of Pluto discovered over the past two years. Pluto is the Roman equivalent of the Greek's Hades, lord of the underworld, and its three bigger moons have related mythological names: Charon, the ferryman of Hades; Nix for the night goddess; and the multi-headed monster Hydra.

Earth-observing satellite to launch from Calif.

February 8, 2013 4:30 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

NASA is set to launch a new Earth-observing satellite designed to carry on the tradition of documenting changes to the planet's glaciers, forests and coastlines. Mission managers gave the OK earlier this week to proceed with Monday's launch. The Landsat satellite was scheduled to be lifted into orbit from the Vandenberg Air Force Base in California aboard an Atlas V rocket.

No hype with storm; experts call it the real thing

February 8, 2013 4:28 pm | by Seth Borenstein, The Associated Press | News | Comments

You can call it a snowstorm of historic proportions. You can call it the return of New England's blizzard of 1978. You can call it simply dangerous. And you can even call it Nemo. But don't call it hype. The new director of the National Weather Service says some may be getting carried away in describing the winter storm bearing down on the Northeast. But he says the science is simple and chilling.

Coaxial Resonator Oscillator features internal proprietary frequency double

February 8, 2013 3:18 pm | Crystek Crystal | Product Releases | Comments

Crystek’s new CVCO55CXT-5370-5470 Coaxial Resonator Oscillator (CRO) is a coaxial-based VCO with an internal proprietary frequency doubler. The CVCO55CXT family’s frequency doubling, 2X fundamental technology reaches new performance levels of lower phase noise and much lower harmonics over the competition, while achieving lower current consumption in the process.

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150-foot asteroid will buzz Earth, no need to duck

February 8, 2013 9:01 am | by Marcia Dunn, AP Aerospace Reporter | News | Comments

A 150-foot-wide asteroid will come remarkably close to Earth next week, even closer than high-flying communication and weather satellites. It will be the nearest known flyby for an object of this size. But don't worry. Scientists promise the megarock will be at least 17,100 miles away when it zips past next Friday.

NASA scientists build first-ever wide-field X-ray imager

February 7, 2013 2:10 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Three NASA scientists teamed up to develop and demonstrate NASA's first wide-field-of-view soft X-ray camera for studying "charge exchange," a poorly understood phenomenon that occurs when the solar wind collides with Earth's exosphere and neutral gas in interplanetary space.

Engineering Update #3: Watson, Nano Batteries, 3D Chips, and Mission: Impossible Gets Real

February 7, 2013 1:42 pm | Videos | Comments

"Watson," no, not Sherlock's sidekick, but the famous supercomputer who beat the world's best human at Jeopardy, is going back to school. IBM is sending the Watson system to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, so it can improve its "thinking" skills. Because making robots more human always works out just fine.

Iranian "stealth fighter" looks like a clown car

February 7, 2013 11:09 am | by Jason Lomberg, Technical Editor | Blogs | Comments

So it turns out that the new Iranian stealth fighter may be as genuine as the Islamic Republic’s concern for human rights. The regime unveiled the jet, 'Qaher 313', on Saturday, and the blogosphere immediately went to work debunking what could be one of the laziest forgeries of all time.

Closest Earth-like planet 'stroll across park'

February 7, 2013 8:40 am | by MARCIA DUNN AP Aerospace Writer | News | Comments

Earth-like worlds may be closer and more plentiful than anyone imagined. Astronomers reported Wednesday that the nearest Earth-like planet may be just 13 light-years away - or some 77 trillion miles. That planet hasn't been found yet, but should be there based on the team's study of red dwarf stars.

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32-channel discrete-to-digital sensing IC includes built-in lightning protection

February 6, 2013 2:26 pm | Holt Integrated Circuits | Product Releases | Comments

Holt Integrated Circuits today announced the introduction of HI-8435, a new 3.3V, 32-channel, discrete-to-digital sensing IC with SPI interface and built-in lightning protection. The sense input thresholds and hysteresis are programmable via the 20MHz SPI bus and all 32 sense output states may be read with a single SPI command.

Jay Leno test drives Army vehicle

February 6, 2013 12:29 pm | by Cherish Washington, AMC Public Affairs | News | Comments

Jay Leno's garage is known for some of the most impressive vehicles in the world, and parked inside was the Army Materiel Command's Fuel Efficient Demonstrator here, Feb. 4. Gen. Dennis L. Via, commanding general of Army Materiel Command, and Grace Bochenek, AMC's chief technology officer, showcased the Fuel Efficient Demonstrator, or FED, on Leno's Internet car show called Jay Leno's Garage.

Blimps to bolster Washington's air shield in test

February 6, 2013 9:02 am | by Jim Wolf, Reuters | News | Comments

  A pair of big, blimp-like craft, moored to the ground and flying as high as 10,000 feet, are to be added to a high-tech shield designed to protect the Washington D.C. area from air attack, at least for a while.The bulbous, helium-filled "aerostats" - each more than three quarters the length of a football field at 243 feet  

Ahmadinejad says he is ready to be first Iranian in space

February 6, 2013 8:59 am | by Reuters | News | Comments

  President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said on Monday he was ready to be the first human sent into orbit by Iran's fledgling space program, Iranian media reported. Iran declared last week that it had successfully launched a monkey into space and retrieved it alive, which officials hailed as a major step towards their goal of sending humans into space.  

UK's space age Antarctic base can slide across ice

February 6, 2013 8:56 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Researchers say that Britain's new Antarctic base will be movable - capable of sliding across the ice on ski-clad stilts. The innovation will enable researchers to keep one step ahead of the southern continent's shifting ice and pounding snows. The British Antarctic Survey says that the Halley VI Research Station

New waterjets could propel LCS to greater speeds

February 5, 2013 3:59 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The Navy's fifth Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), Milwaukee, will be the first to benefit from new high-power density waterjets aimed at staving off rudder and propeller damage experienced on high-speed ships.

Mars or bust

February 5, 2013 9:10 am | by David Mantey, Executive Editor, PD&D | Blogs | Comments

Could you go to Mars? Sacrifice everything; friends, family, and (possibly) future in order to be one of the first colonists on the red planet? Maybe if you were the first to plant a boot print in the dusty red sand, you would have some sort of historical notoriety....

If space shuttle is doomed, do you tell the crew?

February 4, 2013 9:29 am | by SETH BORENSTEIN AP Science Writer | News | Comments

A NASA top official wrestled with what he thought was a hypothetical question: What should you tell the astronauts of a doomed space shuttle Columbia? When the NASA official raised the question in 2003 just days before the accident that claimed seven astronauts' lives, managers thought - wrongly - that Columbia's heat shield was fine.

Top 10 posts for January

February 1, 2013 12:41 pm | by Kasey Panetta, Associate Editor | Blogs | Comments

We had a record-breaking January here at ECN online with our most trafficked month in the history of the website. So, without further delay, here’s a rundown of the most read, most popular, most awesome articles on the web. Take a look at what you missed the first time around or check up on an old favorite to see the conversation in the comments.

Space shuttle Columbia's second life - as a cautionary tale

February 1, 2013 10:09 am | by Irene Klotz, Reuters | News | Comments

Space shuttle Columbia's flying days came to an abrupt and tragic end on February 1, 2003, when a broken wing gave way, dooming the seven astronauts aboard. Although Columbia now lies in pieces, its mission is not over.

Russian rocket falls into sea in failed launch: reports

February 1, 2013 10:08 am | News | Comments

A rocket carrying a communications satellite suffered engine trouble and plunged into the Pacific Ocean shortly after launch on Friday, Russian news agencies reported.

Enfeebled F-35 could impede military readiness

January 31, 2013 3:15 pm | by Jason Lomberg, Technical Editor | Blogs | Comments

Picture a Swiss Army Knife with a blunted knife, rusty screwdriver, and a broken can opener. That’s what the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter has become — a jack of all trades and master of none. The F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) has — over the course of a highly tumultuous development period that personifies the phrase "requirements creep" — become the poster child for bloated government programs.

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