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Photos of the Day: GE's WWII high-altitude flying suit

June 6, 2014 11:49 am | by GE Reports | News | Comments

GE developed a life-size dummy called the Copper Man to spare human volunteers of discomfort when testing the suit’s extremes. The dummy was 5 feet and 10 and a half inches tall, and covered with copper skin one-sixteenth inch thick. Its head, hands, torso and feet were connected by an electrical mesh that could take readings from 15 different body areas.

Moon rocks indicate Earth's orb born of collision

June 6, 2014 9:27 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A new study strengthens the notion that our moon was created by a collision between Earth and a planet-sized object some 4.5 billion years ago. German scientists studied moon rocks gathered by astronauts nearly a half-century ago in the Apollo 11, 12 and 16 missions. They analyzed various kinds of oxygen atoms and found the moon rocks have a different makeup than Earth rocks do.

Removing the barriers to successful autonomous unmanned aircraft

June 5, 2014 12:14 pm | by National Academy of Sciences | News | Comments

While civil aviation is on the threshold of potentially revolutionary changes with the emergence of increasingly autonomous unmanned aircraft, these new systems pose serious questions about how they will be safely and efficiently integrated into the existing civil aviation structure, says a new report from the National Research Council. The report identifies key barriers and provides...

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Engineering Update #61: A planet that shouldn’t exist

June 5, 2014 9:51 am | by Jon Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

Announced at a press conference at meeting of the American Astronomical society, was the discovery of a planet that is 17-times heavier than earth called Kepler-10c. The planet exists in the Draco constellation, about 560 light-years from earth. The latest smart phone security: If someone does something suspicious with a phone...

Drones give farmers an eye in the sky to check on crop progress

June 5, 2014 9:21 am | by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign | News | Comments

This growing season, crop researchers at the University of Illinois are experimenting with the use of drones – unmanned aerial vehicles – on the university's South Farms. Dennis Bowman, a crop sciences educator with U. of I. Extension, is using two drones to take aerial pictures of crops growing in research plots on the farms. 

U.S. hottest spots of warming: Northeast, Southwest

June 5, 2014 9:09 am | by SETH BORENSTEIN AP SCIENCE WRITER | News | Comments

The United States is warming fastest at two of its corners, in the Northeast and the Southwest, an analysis of federal temperature records shows. Northeastern states - led by Maine and Vermont - have gotten the hottest in the last 30 years in annual temperature, gaining 2.5 degrees on average. But Southwestern states have heated up the most in the hottest months...

U.S. General says S. Korea databases hacked

June 5, 2014 9:06 am | by YOUKYUNG LEE AP TECHNOLOGY WRITER | News | Comments

The top U.S. military official in South Korea said a hacking incident might have compromised the personal information of thousands of South Koreans employed by the American command. Gen. Curtis M. Scaparrotti, commander of U.S. Forces in South Korea, apologized Thursday for the "possible theft" from two databases of private details of South Koreans such as names, contact information and work history.

This technology can hack your car from 1500 miles away

June 4, 2014 5:15 pm | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor | Blogs | Comments

Automotive security is odd in that it’s basically nonexistent. We drive around every day in giant, metal contraptions completely controlled by a central computer (more or less) and that computer is essentially open to whoever is bored (or mad) enough to hack it.

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Connecters designed for military, harsh environment

June 4, 2014 2:42 pm | Omnetics Connector Corporation | Product Releases | Comments

Omnetics Connector Corporation (Minneapolis, MN) announces its new line of Metal Nano-Connectors, which are high-density, multi-position connectors made with break-away or threaded metal housings for a positive lock and environmental seal.

Photos of the Day: This flying car will hit the sky in 2016

June 4, 2014 12:47 pm | News | Comments

Terrafugia, a company whose name comes from the latin for "Escape the Earth," has been developing a street-legal airplane. If you'll stop to think for a minute, a street-legal airplane is a flying car. This company is making a flying car. They've promised it will hit the market in 2016. The first prototype the company offered was called The Transition, which runs on premium unleaded automotive gas.

Counterfeit sub parts raise national security concerns

June 4, 2014 11:50 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A Massachusetts man has pleaded guilty to shipping potentially dangerous counterfeit semiconductors to the U.S. Navy base in Connecticut for use in nuclear submarines. Peter Picone, of Methuen, Massachusetts, took a plea deal Tuesday in federal court in Hartford. He faces up to 46 months in prison when he is sentenced Aug. 22.

Black hole ‘batteries’ keep blazars going and going

June 4, 2014 11:32 am | by NASA | News | Comments

Astronomers studying two classes of black-hole-powered galaxies monitored by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have found evidence that they represent different sides of the same cosmic coin. By unraveling how these objects, called blazars, are distributed throughout the universe, the scientists suggest that apparently distinctive properties defining each class more...

Man gets 3 months for smuggling dinosaur skeleton

June 4, 2014 9:14 am | by LARRY NEUMEISTER, The Associated Press | News | Comments

NEW YORK (AP) — A Virginia fossils dealer was sentenced Tuesday to three months in prison even after a prosecutor described his cooperation with law enforcement in heroic terms, saying he enabled more than 18 largely complete dinosaur fossils to be located, enough for Mongolia to open its first dinosaur museum.

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Hubble:Hubble unveils a colourful view of the Universe

June 4, 2014 9:13 am | by European Space Agency | News | Comments

Astronomers using the Hubble Space Telescope have captured the most comprehensive picture ever assembled of the evolving Universe – and one of the most colourful. The study is called the Ultraviolet Coverage of the Hubble Ultra Deep Field (UVUDF) project.

Photos of the Day: Solar Impulse 2 takes flight

June 3, 2014 3:57 pm | by Solar Impulse | Blogs | Comments

Solar Impulse 2, a.k.a. the "Round-the-World" solar airplane, is a single-seater airplane made from carbon fiber with 17,000 solar cells that supple four electric 17.5 CV (each) with energy. Those solar cells recharge the lithium batteries that allow the plane to fly at night.

NASA snaps cosmic color portrait 'and then some'

June 3, 2014 3:14 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

The Hubble Space Telescope has captured our cosmos at its most colorful. A new NASA panorama looking deep and far into the universe for the first time includes ultraviolet light, which is normally not visible to the human eye. It shows up in the photo as bright baby blue with spinning galaxies, which are about 5 to 10 billion years old, not too old or young in cosmic terms.

Optocoupler tested and certified for harsh environments

June 3, 2014 11:15 am | Product Releases | Comments

Standex-Meder Electronics (Cincinnati, Ohio) announces a new ATEX optocoupler for intrinsically safe circuits. The optocoupler series are tested and certified for extreme/harsh environments such as potentially explosive atmospheres so they will not become an ignition point when subjected to short circuits or adjacent component failures.

Photos of the Day: ISEE-3 Reboot project breathes life into 1978 NASA mission

June 2, 2014 3:24 pm | by ECN Staff | Blogs | Comments

The ISEE-3 Reboot project has brought together a group of civilians and engineers from NASA with the joint goal of rebooting the original 1978 mission of the explorer. The spacecraft was launched on August 12, 1978 as one of three crafts designed to study Earth's magnetic field and the solar wind. It was the first craft to visit a comet, passing within 7,800 km of the nucleus of Comet Giacobini-Zinner.

NASA to test giant Mars parachute on Earth

June 2, 2014 10:48 am | by ALICIA CHANG, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The skies off the Hawaiian island of Kauai will be a stand-in for Mars as NASA prepares to launch a saucer-shaped vehicle in an experimental flight designed to land heavy loads on the red planet. For decades, robotic landers and rovers have hitched a ride to Earth's planetary neighbor using the same parachute design. But NASA needs a bigger and stronger parachute if it wants to send astronauts there.

Precision Guidance: Company developing autonomous Black Hawk helicopter

June 2, 2014 9:23 am | by Jon Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

One of the biggest announcements from the recent Unmanned Systems expo in Orlando, Florida was the news that Sikorsky Aircraft is developing an autonomous version of the Black Hawk helicopter. The optionally piloted UH-60A Black Hawk leverages the company’s Matrix technology — a major research program for vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) aircraft....

Two GOES-R instruments complete spacecraft integration

May 30, 2014 2:30 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Two of the six instruments that will fly on NOAA's first Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite - R (GOES-R) satellite have completed integration with the spacecraft. The Solar Ultraviolet Imager (SUVI) and Extreme Ultraviolet and X-ray Irradiance Sensors (EXIS) were installed on the sun-pointing platform....

Using thoughts to control airplanes

May 30, 2014 11:37 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The pilot is wearing a white cap with myriad attached cables. His gaze is concentrated on the runway ahead of him. All of a sudden the control stick starts to move, as if by magic. The airplane banks and then approaches straight on towards the runway. The position of the plane is corrected time and again....

Aircraft wings that change their shape in flight can help to protect the environment

May 30, 2014 10:55 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A top priority for any airline is to conserve as much fuel as possible – and this helps to protect the environment. The EU project SARISTU aims to reduce kerosene consumption by six percent, and integrating flexible landing devices into aircraft wings is one step towards that target....

Mars spacecraft research lands Exeter student top international fellowship

May 30, 2014 10:46 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

An Exeter student has been honoured with a prestigious international award, designed to promote female excellence in the pioneering sphere of aerospace research. Anusha Mujumdar has been selected to receive a Zonta International Amelia Earhart Fellowship – one of only 35 students worldwide to be bestowed with the coveted award....

Waveguide duplexer with ceramic filter technology rivals air-cavity devices

May 30, 2014 9:37 am | Product Releases | Comments

CTS Corporation (Elkhart, IN) through its subsidiary, CTS Electronic Components, Inc., announces its new ClearPlex Waveguide Duplexer, delivering performance comparable to air-cavity with 2x to 4x smaller size, according to the company, for cellular infrastructure, 6-10 GHz microwave, NLOS backhaul and military communications.

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