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The Lead

Be thankful marketing isn't running R&D

November 19, 2014 4:29 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief, MDT | Blogs | Comments

I’m back in the office after my annual trip to Minneapolis for a trade show that always happens around the Halloween time of year. The timing seems strangely appropriate given how scary the diminishing event has become. That is to say ...

Universal contact interconnects designed for right-angle applications

November 19, 2014 12:00 pm | Product Releases | Comments

ITT Corporation (Santa Ana, CA) and its Cannon brand announced a new offering of universal-...

Kasey's Korner: Affordable, inflatable incubator

November 14, 2014 11:18 am | by Jon Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

Dyson just handed out their James Dyson award and this year it’s going to a young inventor who...

Kasey's Korner: A new treatment for bone fractures

November 10, 2014 12:07 pm | by Jon Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Advanced Materials have...

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Image sensors enable exceptional low-light video capture

November 4, 2014 1:24 pm | On Semiconductor | Product Releases | Comments

ON Semiconductor (Phoenix, AZ) has set a new benchmark in low-light imaging for industrial markets with the introduction of a new class of CCD image sensor technology. Combining ON Semiconductor’s industry-leading Interline Transfer (IT) CCD ...

SMT detect switches include ultra-low, board-mounted profile

October 29, 2014 5:29 pm | C&K Components | Product Releases | Comments

C&K Components (Newton, MA) has developed a new series of microminiature, side-actuated detect switches with an ultra-low, board-mounted profile. The HDP Series switches measure just 5.7mm x 8.35mm in the "free" position and feature a very low profile....

How do we make the breast pump 'not suck'?

October 29, 2014 1:50 pm | by Melissa Barnes, Associate Editor, PD&D | Blogs | Comments

When I read the recent news item about MIT’s “Make the Breast Pump Not Suck Hackathon,” I thought it couldn’t have come at a more relevant time in my life. Having just had a baby under seven months ago, and trying to continue a regular breastfeeding regimen ...

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LED keychain flashlight powered by four coin cells

October 28, 2014 5:02 pm | Pelican Products, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Pelican Products Inc. (Torrance, CA) has introduced the tough-as-nails, water-resistant Pelican ProGear 1810 LED keychain everyday use flashlight. As the smallest Pelican flashlight ever made, it’s great to clip on a backpack or store inside a medical/tool kit....

This mouse of the future requires your whole body

October 27, 2014 11:44 am | by Kasey Panetta, Editor | Blogs | Comments

If you thought Leap Motion was going to be the mouse of the future (ok, I thought it was) then you should brace yourself for what could be the next big thing in the world of the mouse. The Dynamic Chair is a full-body chair designed to replace the traditional mouse....

Push button switch provides the appearance and “feel” of stainless steel

October 24, 2014 9:04 am | Product Releases | Comments

Foremost Electronics (Essex, UK) is now stocking the YB2 Half-mirrored push button switch family from NKK Switches. This new switch is suited to applications including machinery, medical devices, kitchen equipment, measurement instruments ...

The most creative way to use LEDs

October 22, 2014 10:29 am | by Kasey Panetta, Editor | Blogs | Comments

It’s time for the Brainstorm for our December issue on LEDs! LEDs have become increasingly popular due to falling prices and increasing life spans. We want to know what you are designing them into or what the coolest implementation you've seen is!

When cadavers beat computers

October 17, 2014 10:12 am | by Michigan State University | Blogs | Comments

Despite the growing popularity of using computer simulation to help teach college anatomy, students learn much better through the traditional use of human cadavers, according to new research that has implications for health care. Cary Roseth, associate professor of educational psychology at Michigan State University, said the study suggests cadaver-based instruction should continue in undergraduate human anatomy...

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Personalized vaccines for ovarian cancer

October 17, 2014 10:09 am | by University of Connecticut | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of Connecticut have found a new way to identify protein mutations in cancer cells. The novel method is being used to develop personalized vaccines to treat patients with ovarian cancer. UConn bioinformatics engineer Ion Mandoiu, associate professor of computer science and engineering, collaborated..

Designing the antibiotics of the future

October 17, 2014 10:06 am | by The University of Bristol | News | Comments

Scientists have used computer simulations to show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics – a breakthrough which will help develop drugs which can effectively tackle infections in the future. Researchers at the University of Bristol focused on the role of enzymes in the bacteria, which split the structure of the antibiotic and stop it working, making the bacteria resistant.

Tuning light to kill deep cancer tumors

October 16, 2014 10:28 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

An international group of scientists led by Gang Han, PhD, at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, has combined a new type of nanoparticle with an FDA-approved photodynamic therapy to effectively kill deep-set cancer cells in vivo with minimal damage....

How the new HealthCare.gov stacks up with the old

October 14, 2014 9:31 am | by RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR and CALVIN WOODWARD, Associated Press | News | Comments

HealthCare.gov, the website for health insurance under President Barack Obama's health care law, has been revamped as its second enrollment season approaches. But things are still complicated, since other major provisions of the Affordable Care Act ...

From wearables to implantables to ... what’s next?

October 9, 2014 2:35 pm | by Sean Fenske, Editor-in-Chief, MDT | Blogs | Comments

Some time has passed since the Apple announcement of the company’s “iWatch” (at least as of the time I’m writing this) and all the pomp and circumstance that goes along with it. Unfortunately, from the mobile healthcare aspect, it was underwhelming to say the least....

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Next edition of HealthCare.gov is unveiled

October 9, 2014 9:08 am | by RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, Associated Press | News | Comments

The Obama administration unveiled a new version of HealthCare.gov on Wednesday, with some improvements as well as at least one early mistake and a new challenge. Officials also said that HealthCare.gov won't display premiums for 2015....

Choosing the right processor for multimedia, display, and IoT applications

October 8, 2014 1:45 pm | by Amanda McGregor, Freescale Product Marketing Manager | Articles | Comments

Consumers use a wide range of devices on a daily basis. This familiarity has led to high user expectations surrounding devices and a high bar for engineers. Even traditional embedded designs are undergoing transformation with new connectivity....

Fiber optic ESTOP and U-Beam sensors designed for harsh/hazardous environments

October 6, 2014 12:47 pm | Micronor, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Micronor (Newbury Park, CA) introduces two new inherently safe, fiber optic signaling products for the industrial automation, robotic, and medical markets. The MR380 series Fiber Optic Emergency Stop offers ESTOP Functional Safety compliance with SIL1 rating....

New study shows that yoga and meditation may help train the brain

October 3, 2014 1:00 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

New research by biomedical engineers at the University of Minnesota shows that people who practice yoga and meditation long term can learn to control a computer with their minds faster and better than people with little or no yoga or meditation....

Thermotolerant yeast can provide more climate-smart ethanol

October 3, 2014 10:27 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

With a simple mutation, yeast can grow in higher than normal temperatures. Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology demonstrate this in an article to be published in the scientific journal Science. The findings may result in ethanol....

New software for Google Glass provides captions for hard-of-hearing users

October 3, 2014 8:44 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A team of Georgia Institute of Technology researchers has created speech-to-text software for Google Glass that helps hard-of-hearing users with everyday conversations. A hard-of-hearing person wears Glass while a second person speaks directly....

'Virtual breast' could improve cancer detection

September 30, 2014 4:26 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Next to lung cancer, breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women, according to the American Cancer Society. That's why so many medical professionals encourage women to get mammograms, even though the tests are imperfect....

A safer approach for diagnostic medical imaging

September 30, 2014 3:44 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Medical imaging is at the forefront of diagnostics today, with imaging techniques like MRI (magnetic resonance imaging), CT (computerized tomography), scanning, and NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) increasing steeply over the last two decades....

NIH taps lab to develop sophisticated electrode array system to monitor brain act

September 30, 2014 2:56 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) a grant today to develop an electrode array system that will enable researchers to better understand how the brain works through unprecedented....

Penn team studies nanocrystals by passing them through tiny pores

September 26, 2014 2:59 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

An interdisciplinary team of University of Pennsylvania researchers has now applied a cutting-edge technique for rapid gene sequencing toward measuring other nanoscopic structures. By passing nanoscale spheres and rods through a tiny hole....

Scanning babies' fingerprints could save lives

September 26, 2014 2:41 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Each year 2.5 million children die worldwide because they do not receive life-saving vaccinations at the appropriate time. Anil Jain, Michigan State University professor, is developing a fingerprint-based recognition method to track vaccination....

How three teenage girls are solving world hunger

September 26, 2014 11:50 am | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor | Blogs | Comments

The key to beefing up the country (and world) supply of engineer and technology superstars is giving them the opportunity to do great things, even if they can’t legally drive yet. The Google Science Fair is a competition for students between the ages of 13 and 18 with prizes ranging...

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