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Researchers Devise New, Stretchable Antenna for Wearable Health Monitoring

March 18, 2014 11:13 am | by eurekalert! | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new, stretchable antenna that can be incorporated into wearable technologies, such as health monitoring devices. The extremely flexible antennas contain silver nanowires and can be incorporated into wearable health monitoring devices.

Fighting antibiotic resistance with 'molecular drill bits'

March 17, 2014 12:41 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

In response to drug-resistant "superbugs" that send millions of people to hospitals around the world, scientists are building tiny, "molecular drill bits" that kill bacteria by bursting through their protective cell walls. They presented some of the latest developments on these drill bits, better known to scientists as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs).

Researchers created a mouse that expresses a fluorescing ‘biosensor’ in every cell of its body

March 14, 2014 11:38 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Garvan and UK researchers have created a mouse that expresses a fluorescing ‘biosensor’ in every cell of its body, allowing diseased cells and drugs to be tracked and evaluated in real time and in three dimensions. The mouse also allows diseased cells and drugs to be tracked and evaluated in real time and in three dimensions.

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Researchers write languages to design synthetic living systems useful for new products, health care

March 14, 2014 9:16 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Researchers at Virginia Tech and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have used a computer-aided design tool to create genetic languages to guide the design of biological systems. Known as GenoCAD, the open-source software was developed to help synthetic biologists capture biological rules to engineer organisms that produce useful products or health-care solutions from inexpensive, renewable materials.

Salt detectors block interfering radiation

March 11, 2014 2:54 pm | Calsensors | Product Releases | Comments

Cal Sensors (Santa Rosa, CA) launched a new line of single channel detectors (SCD) that block unwanted radiation below 1.2 microns. Exploiting the innate transmission bandwidth of Silicon, the new SCD-Si detectors are packaged with anti-reflection Silicon windows to block

Blind can 'hear' colors and shapes, show Hebrew U. researchers

March 10, 2014 9:37 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

What if you could "hear" colors? Or shapes? These features are normally perceived visually, but using sensory substitution devices (SSDs) they can now be conveyed to the brain noninvasively through other senses.  At the Center for Human Perception and Cognition, the blind and visually impaired are being offered tools, via training with SSDs, to receive environmental visual information and interact with it in ways otherwise unimaginable.

Engineering Newswire: Body mounted joystick gives astronauts touch feedback

March 10, 2014 9:27 am | by Alex Shanahan, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

Today on Engineering Newswire, we're getting touchy feely with a body-mounted joystick, 3D-printing heart attack predictors, and installing a fifth eye. This episode features touchy feely body joysticks: To help astronauts experience touch-based feedback in weightlessness...

Samuel Achilefu, WUSTL scientists develop high-tech glasses that detect cancer cells during surgery

March 10, 2014 9:01 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A team of scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis (WUSTL) and the University of Arizona (UA) in Tucson led by SPIE Fellow Samuel Achilefu have created a pair of high-tech glasses that help surgeons visualize cancer cells during surgeries, which glow blue when viewed through the glasses.

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Volume of notifiable disease reporting may double with required electronic lab reporting

March 7, 2014 1:25 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Public health departments nationwide are already feeling the strain from budget cuts. But their case report volumes are forecasted to double when federal requirements for automated electronic laboratory reporting of notifiable diseases go into effect next year, according to a new study.

Photos of the Day: The AT Black Knight Transformer

March 7, 2014 8:55 am | News | Comments

The AT Black Knight Transformer is the world’s first roadable, vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) aircraft. It has the ability to transform from a VTOL helicopter to an off-road vehicle. The Black Knight was designed as a rapid-response evac vehicle for wounded soldiers or cargo transport.

Snap-action switch includes electrical life of 100,000 cycles typically

March 6, 2014 3:47 pm | Cit Relay & Switch | Product Releases | Comments

The CIT Relay & Switch (Minneapolis, MN) SM3 Series snap-action switch offers choice a of single pole single throw or a single pole double throw circuit. This UL/CUL recognized switch is available in 0.110" quick connect, solder lug, PC terminal and right angle PC termination.

Valve controller features 24 watt temperature controllers for J-type thermocouples

March 6, 2014 3:27 pm | Nordson Efd Llc | Product Releases | Comments

Nordson EFD (East Providence, RI) introduces the new ValveMate 9000, state-of-the-art precision valve controller. The intricate microprocessor circuitry ensures the dispensing of precise, accurate, and repeatable amounts of the adhesives, lubricants, and other assembly fluids....

New shrinking gel steers tooth tissue formation

March 5, 2014 2:00 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A bit of pressure from a new shrinking, sponge-like gel is all it takes to turn transplanted unspecialized cells into cells that lay down minerals and begin to form teeth. The bioinspired gel material could one day help repair or replace damaged organs, such as teeth and bone, and possibly other organs as well.

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7 things I’ll need for my house in 2025

March 3, 2014 7:47 am | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor | Blogs | Comments

I can’t wait to live in GE’s home of the future. (Last week, I talked about the car I must have, so it seems fitting that my next topic be about my dream house. As with the car, this is assuming an unlimited budget and available technology.) Last week, I headed to Allentown, PA to the Da Vinci Science Center in order to see an exhibit called Home 2025.

UCLA study finds robotic-assisted prostate surgery offers better cancer control

February 28, 2014 4:47 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

An observational study from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center has found that prostate cancer patients who undergo robotic-assisted prostate surgery have fewer instances of cancer cells at the edge of their surgical specimen and less need for additional cancer treatments like hormone or radiation therapy than patients who have traditional "open" surgery.

3-D imaging sheds light on Apert syndrome development

February 28, 2014 3:47 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Three dimensional imaging of two different mouse models of Apert Syndrome shows that cranial deformation begins before birth and continues, worsening with time, according to a team of researchers who studied mice to better understand and treat the disorder in humans.

Scripps Clinic first to implant miniature cardiac monitor

February 28, 2014 3:42 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Small, wireless monitor provides long-term remote monitoring to help physicians diagnose and monitor irregular heartbeats: Scripps Green Hospital has become the first hospital in the United States to implant the world's smallest implantable cardiac monitoring device. Scripps Clinic cardiologist John Rogers, M.D., successfully completed the first implant of the Reveal LINQ™ Insertable Cardiac Monitor (ICM)  on Saturday.

Brain stimulation at your fingertips: Stimulation glove for stroke patients

February 28, 2014 3:26 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Learning an instrument, dancing ballet or reading braille – the golden rule for acquiring skills such as these is: practise, practise, practise. However, there are some things that the brain learns without any training at all. RUB researchers have demonstrated in several studies...

Medical grade, 65-W power adapters are approved to latest safety standards

February 28, 2014 2:41 pm | Tumbler Technologies + Trumpower | Product Releases | Comments

TRUMPower (Santa Clara, CA) launched the TMP65 Series of low cost medical grade AC/DC desktop power adapters, which has both Class I and Class II models availability. The TMP65 Class II units, furnished with an IEC 320/C8 AC inlet without a ground pin, are

Twitter 'big data' can be used to monitor HIV and drug-related behavior, UCLA study shows

February 28, 2014 10:03 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Real-time social media like Twitter could be used to track HIV incidence and drug-related behaviors with the aim of detecting and potentially preventing outbreaks, a new UCLA-led study shows. The study, published in Preventive Medicine, suggests it may be possible to predict sexual risk....

First-of-its-kind web portal to bolster research and treatment for rare diseases

February 28, 2014 9:58 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A new web portal – called PhenomeCentral – is being launched today to connect clinicians and scientists worldwide in an effort to speed the discovery of genes responsible for rare disorders. More than 350 million people suffer from over 7,000 rare diseases worldwide....

Cancer targeted treatments from space station discoveries

February 27, 2014 5:02 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Invasive and systemic cancer treatment is a necessary evil for many people with the devastating diagnosis. If treatments targeted a patient's cancerous tissues, it could provide clinicians with an alternative to lessen the delivery of toxic levels of chemotherapy or radiation. Imagine the quality of life from such therapies for patients. Remarkably, research that began in space may soon result in such options here on Earth.

Google Glass could help stop emerging public health threats around the world

February 27, 2014 1:10 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The much-talked-about Google Glass — the eyewear with computer capabilities — could potentially save lives, especially in isolated or far-flung locations, say scientists. They are reporting development of a Google Glass app that takes a picture of a diagnostic test strip and sends the data to computers, which then beam back a diagnostic report to the user. The information also could help researchers track the spread of diseases.

Engineering Update 47: The world's fastest sports car

February 27, 2014 11:45 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

In this episode of the Engineering Update, brought to you by Mouser Electronics: The world's fastest sports car: Hennessey Venom GT might have just become the fastest 2-seats sports car in the world. In a run that took place on February 14 at the Kennedy space center, the Venom hit speeds of 270.49 mpg.

Cancer cells: Finding the few foes among billions of friends

February 27, 2014 10:35 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Beating cancer is all about early detection, and new research from the University of South Carolina is another step forward in catching the disease early. A team of chemists is reporting a new way to detect just a few lurking tumor cells, which can be outnumbered a billion to one in the bloodstream by healthy cells. 

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