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This first-aid kit is a must-have

July 31, 2014 8:55 am | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor | Blogs | Comments

The Clever Medkit is a first-aid kit to end all first-aid kits. This over-the-top technologically advanced kit is technically designed for businesses, but I would consider this for a home purchase because I am a germaphobe and hypochondriac. (Yesterday, I used a Lysol wipe on my pens.) So, let’s walk through the process of injuring yourself and using this bad boy.

NASA-funded X-ray instrument settles interstellar debate

July 31, 2014 8:39 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

New findings from a NASA-funded instrument have resolved a decades-old puzzle about a fog of low-energy X-rays observed over the entire sky. Thanks to refurbished detectors first flown on a NASA sounding rocket in the 1970s, astronomers have now confirmed the long-held suspicion that much of this glow stems from a region of million-degree interstellar plasma known as the local hot bubble, or LHB....

Seeing is bead-lieving

July 30, 2014 11:45 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Rice University researchers are using magnetic beads and DNA "springs" to create chains of varying flexibility that can be used as microscale models for polymer macromolecules. The experiment is visual proof that "bead-spring" polymers, introduced as theory in the 1950s, can be made as stiff or as flexible as required and should be of interest to materials scientists who study the basic physics of polymer....

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Income is a major driver of avoidable hospitalizations across New Jersey

July 30, 2014 11:37 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The household income of its residents is the most important factor in whether a community has high or low rates of avoidable hospital visits – conditions that could be better managed in a doctor's office or other health care settings if treated at an early stage, according to a report released today by the Rutgers Center for State Health Policy (CSHP)....

Teen insomnia is linked with depression and anxiety

July 30, 2014 10:29 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A study of high school students by University of Adelaide psychology researchers has shed new light on the links between insomnia-related mental health conditions among teens. School of Psychology PhD student Pasquale Alvaro surveyed more than 300 Australian high school students aged 12-18 to better understand their sleep habits, mental health condition and the time of day they were most active (known as their "chronotype")....

Brainwaves can predict audience reaction

July 30, 2014 10:26 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Media and marketing experts have long sought a reliable method of forecasting responses from the general population to future products and messages. According to a study conducted at The City College of New York, it appears that the brain responses of just a few individuals are a remarkably strong predictor....

App for headache sufferers shows success

July 30, 2014 9:29 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A unique app that helps headache sufferers to record the severity and regularity of their pain is being used as part of a Griffith research study. A new approach to the treatment of headaches, the ENHANCE project looks at coping with their triggers and is being led by Professor Paul Martin from Griffith Health Institute's Behavioral Basis of Health program....

The Pulse: Reading minds with Google Glass and walking with Toyota

July 29, 2014 2:39 pm | by Jon Dipierro, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

This week on the Pulse, we're using an open source app to read minds with Google Glass, using Toyota robots to help disabled people walk again, performing an endoscopy with a smartphone, and zinging around on a lightweight mobility chair....

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Booming mobile health app market needs more FDA oversight for consumer safety, confidence

July 28, 2014 1:39 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Smart phones and mobile devices are on the cusp of revolutionizing health care, armed with mobile health ("mHealth") apps capable of providing everything from cardiac measurements to sonograms. While tremendous potential exists to broaden access to medical treatment and control costs ...

Low-loss, flexible cables rival semi-rigid

July 23, 2014 10:46 am | Product Releases | Comments

High Speed Interconnects (Scottsdale, AZ) has announced a new range of flexible cable assemblies which outperform semi-rigid cable performance. Combining advanced coaxial cable and proprietary VP90 expanded PTFE (ePTFE) extrusion technologies, HSI is able to…

Please don't 3D print me when I'm dead

July 23, 2014 8:49 am | by David Mantey, Editor-in-Chief | Blogs | Comments

When I die, please don’t grow pieces of me. Whether the practice is in the name of science, art, or engineering, after I’ve been harvested of all viable organs in my remaining vessel, do not reconstruct and 3D print any body part to be kept alive inside a case of "nourishing liquid"....

40V COT controller delivers 0.008%/V line regulation

July 22, 2014 10:17 am | Exar | Product Releases | Comments

Exar Corporation (Fremont, CA) introduced the XR75100, a new 40V capable switching controller in its line of DC-DC power conversion products. The XR75100 Synchronous Step-Down Controller supports point-of-load (POL) supplies from industrial 24VDC and 24VAC rectified sources....

Why this remote-controlled birth control will be the next big thing

July 22, 2014 9:49 am | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor | Blogs | Comments

In the midst of the Hobby Lobby court case decision and other conversations about birth control, there has been an announcement about an advancement in contraceptive technology. This is a pretty unique technology that would allow the woman to turn the device on or off, depending on if she was looking to have a child or not....

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New technique uses 'simulated' human heart to screen drugs

July 21, 2014 12:43 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A Coventry University scientist has developed a pioneering new way – using samples of beating heart tissue – to test the effect of drugs on the heart without using human or animal trials. The breakthrough is the work of Dr Helen Maddock – an expert in cardiovascular physiology....

Ultrafast X-Ray Laser Sheds New Light on Fundamental Utrafast Dynamics

July 18, 2014 11:36 am | by Kansas State University | News | Comments

Ultrafast X-ray laser research led by Kansas State University has provided scientists with a snapshot of a fundamental molecular phenomenon. The finding sheds new light on microscopic electron motion in molecules ...    

Treating Pipelines Like Patients

July 18, 2014 11:33 am | by Chris Fox, Editor | Articles | Comments

Engineering these days has a tendency to cross disciplines more than ever. Decades ago, companies started using medical technologies (radiography to be exact) to inspect solid structures and mechanical parts ...     

Getting a Grip on Robotic Grasp

July 18, 2014 11:16 am | by MIT | News | Comments

Twisting a screwdriver, removing a bottle cap, and peeling a banana are just a few simple tasks that are tricky to pull off single-handedly. Now a new wrist-mounted robot can provide a helping hand — or rather, fingers ...   

Engineering Newswire 99: Marines Unveil Amphibious Monster Vehicle

July 18, 2014 9:29 am | by Alex Shanahan, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

Today on Engineering Newswire, we’re healing bones faster than ever, learning to curve bullets, and test-driving a half-scale amphibious vehicle ...               

Self-assembling nanoparticle could improve MRI scanning for cancer diagnosis

July 16, 2014 4:22 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Scientists have designed a new self-assembling nanoparticle that targets tumours, to help doctors diagnose cancer earlier. The new nanoparticle, developed by researchers at Imperial College London, boosts the effectiveness of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanning by specifically seeking out receptors that are found in cancerous cells.

Multilayer ceramic chip inductors suit telecom, networking, medical, and industrial applications

July 15, 2014 3:21 pm | Pulse Electronics | Product Releases | Comments

Pulse Electronics Corporation (San Diego, CA) has extended its inductor product offerings with a new line of high frequency multilayer ceramic chip inductors. These RF ceramic inductors have low DC resistance, high Q values at higher frequencies, high self-resonant frequency, and high reliability.

Image sensor targets traffic, surveillance, medical imaging and industrial inspection

July 15, 2014 10:01 am | On Semiconductor | Product Releases | Comments

ON Semiconductor (Phoenix, AZ) is enhancing its charge-coupled device (CCD) image sensor portfolio with new technology for industrial applications. The new KAI-08051 Image Sensor provides improved light sensitivity, reduced read noise, and improved color accuracy compared to the previous generation...

Zero-drift instrumentation amplifier provides low power, high accuracy

July 15, 2014 8:42 am | Microchip Technology Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Microchip Technology Inc. (Chandler, AZ) announced the expansion of its instrumentation amplifier portfolio with the new zero-drift MCP6N16. This self-correcting architecture is positioned to DC performance by enabling ultra-low offset, low-offset drift, and desirable common-mode and power-supply rejection, while…

Why contraception by remote control is a troubling idea

July 14, 2014 4:08 pm | by Chris Warner, Executive Editor | Blogs | Comments

Forget about remembering to take a contraceptive pill. In just a few years, keeping track of your remote control may be as essential to family planning as it is to watching TV. MicroCHIPS, a small, Massachusetts company with backing from Bill Gates plans to bring an implantable contraceptive chip that can be turned on or off via remote control to market as early as...

HotSpot: Paint-on skin for concrete structures

July 14, 2014 3:48 pm | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Eastern Finland have developed new "sensing skin" technology designed to serve as an early warning system for concrete structures, allowing authorities to respond quickly to damage in everything from nuclear facilities to bridges....

Better use of electronic health records makes clinical trials less expensive

July 14, 2014 12:57 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Using electronic health records to understand the best available treatment for patients, from a range of possible options, is more efficient and less costly for taxpayers than the existing clinical trial process, a new study shows. Research led by Professor van Staa, carried out while he was a member of the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) ...

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