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Imaging shows long-term impact of blast-induced brain injuries in veterans

December 2, 2013 9:35 am | by Eurekalert! | News | Comments

Using a special type of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), researchers have found that soldiers who suffered mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) induced by blast exposure exhibit long-term brain differences, according to a study being presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

Fruit flies with better sex lives live longer

December 2, 2013 9:28 am | by Eurekalert! | News | Comments

 Sex may in fact be one of the secrets to good health, youth and a longer life – at least for fruit flies – suggests a new University of Michigan study that appears in the journal Science. Male fruit flies that perceived sexual pheromones of their female counterparts – without the opportunity to mate – experienced rapid decreases in fat stores, resistance to starvation and more stress. The sexually frustrated flies lived shorter lives.

Power harvesters enable next wave of energy harvesting design

November 26, 2013 2:47 pm | Texas Instruments | Product Releases | Comments

Texas Instruments introduced five new next-generation power management integrated circuits that acquire and manage microwatts (µW) to milliwatts (mW) of power harvested from light, heat or mechanical energy sources. The bq25570, bq25505, TPS62740, TPS62737 and TPS62736 maintain

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User-configurable switch-mode power supplies targeted at the telecommunications and medical markets

November 26, 2013 12:40 pm | Allegro Microsystems, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Allegro MicroSystems, LLC announces the release of three new switch-mode power supplies. The C, HWB and SWF series have been designed with a user-configurability feature to prevent customers from replacing the entire set of power supplies making it much easier to change specifications.

Medical desktop switcher features up to 94% efficiency

November 22, 2013 2:04 pm | Advanced Power Solutions | Product Releases | Comments

Advanced Power Solutions (APS) announces the release of the APS250EMG series of medical approved desktop switching power supplies with up 94% efficiency and <0.5W No Load Power Consumption for compliance to Level V standards. The APS250EMG series consists of 3 standard models offering single outputs of 12V @ 20A / 24V @ 12 / 48v @ 6A output power....

September 2013: Medical

November 22, 2013 10:32 am | Digital Editions | Comments

The September 2013 issue of ECN deals with Medical Electronics. Managing Editor Kasey Panetta focuses on “fighting an invisible enemy” with UV robots in hospitals, and in the Editor’s View, Executive Editor Chris Warner discusses the controversial practice of license plate scanning.

Study reveals potential breakthrough in hearing technology

November 18, 2013 1:01 pm | by Ohio State University | News | Comments

Computer engineers and hearing scientists at The Ohio State University have made a potential breakthrough in solving a 50-year-old problem in hearing technology: how to help the hearing-impaired understand speech in the midst of background noise. They describe how they used the latest developments in neural networks...  

Isolated monolithic flyback regulator delivers up to 15 Watts

November 13, 2013 1:49 pm | Linear Technology Corporation | Product Releases | Comments

Linear Technology Corporation announces the LT8302, a monolithic flyback regulator that significantly simplifies the design of isolated DC/DC converters. By sampling the isolated output voltage directly from the primary-side flyback waveform, the part requires no opto-isolator or third winding for regulation.

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Versatility of ultra-miniature detect switches on display

November 12, 2013 4:32 pm | by Kyle Peterson, Product Management, C&K Components | Articles | Comments

Ultra-miniature detect switches are playing a significant role in a number of applications today. The miniaturization of key components, including switches, has enabled the continued trend towards end-products getting smaller and smaller.

Building block for exoskeleton could lead to more independence among the elderly

November 12, 2013 11:01 am | by University of Cincinnati | News | Comments

What if certain patients could get a bionic pick-up without undergoing the pain and lengthy recovery of surgery? University of Cincinnati researchers are working on just that idea, with the start of an exoskeleton to support people who – through age or injury – are limited in their movement.

Biosensor could help detect brain injuries during heart surgery

November 12, 2013 10:55 am | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

Johns Hopkins engineers and cardiology experts have teamed up to develop a fingernail-sized biosensor that could alert doctors when serious brain injury occurs during heart surgery. By doing so, the device could help doctors devise new ways to minimize brain damage or begin treatment more quickly.

Robotic advances promise artificial legs that emulate healthy limbs

November 8, 2013 10:28 am | by Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

Recent advances in robotics technology make it possible to create prosthetics that can duplicate the natural movement of human legs. This capability promises to dramatically improve the mobility of lower-limb amputees, allowing them to negotiate stairs and slopes and uneven ground, significantly reducing their risk of falling as well as reducing stress on the rest of their bodies.

3D printers: A cheap solution for amputees and those with genetic defects

November 6, 2013 2:24 pm | by Allegra Sparta, Editorial Intern | Blogs | Comments

“Not to worry, I’ll just print another hand.” This statement would belong in a work of fiction a few years ago, but today, it is reality for those missing fingers or limbs. Prosthetics have come a long way from the archaic image of a pirate hobbling around his ship on a wooden peg leg.

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Health website's security prompts worries

November 6, 2013 12:07 pm | by RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR, Associated Press | News | Comments

Obama administration officials are facing mounting questions about whether they cut corners on security testing while rushing to meet a self-imposed deadline to launch online health insurance markets. Documents show that the part of HealthCare.gov that consumers interact with directly received only a temporary six-month security certification...

Surface-mount enclosure coin cell contacts require minimal board space

November 5, 2013 1:28 pm | Keystone Electronics Corp. | Product Releases | Comments

Keystone Electronics has introduced its latest line of surface mount enclosure coin cell contacts. These new contacts provide a cost effective, dependable connection for coin cell batteries in self-contained battery compartments. These contacts require minimal board space and allow easy access for installation and removal of a coin cell battery within a battery enclosure.

Researcher finds way to reduce unnecessary lab tests, decrease patient costs by modifying software design

November 5, 2013 11:09 am | by University of Missouri-Columbia | News | Comments

When patients undergo diagnostic lab tests as part of the inpatient admission process, they may wonder why or how physicians choose particular tests. Increasingly, medical professionals are using electronic medical systems that provide lists of lab tests from which medical professionals can choose.

A better way to track your every move

November 5, 2013 10:59 am | by Northwestern University | News | Comments

Physical activity tracking apps on smart phones are a potentially important tool for doctors who want to collect data and create treatment or intervention plans to improve the health of patients who struggle with activity and movement -- such as those with Parkinson’s disease. A new Northwestern Medicine study has found a way to make these apps more accurate...

New computing model could lead to quicker advancements in medical research

November 5, 2013 10:50 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

With the promise of personalized and customized medicine, one extremely important tool for its success is the knowledge of a person's unique genetic profile. This personalized knowledge of one's genetic profile has been facilitated by the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS), where sequencing a genome, like the human genome, has gone from costing $95,000,000 to a mere $5,700.

Why you shouldn’t implant computer chips in your arm

November 1, 2013 3:31 pm | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor | Blogs | Comments

In general, medical implants and their components are strictly regulated by the Food and Drug Administration and for good reason. You can’t just stick anything under your skin without extreme consequences including things like major infections, pretty gnarly scaring, and potentially deadly health complications.

Button cells ideally suited for medical applications

November 1, 2013 1:40 pm | Varta Microbattery | Product Releases | Comments

Announced  by VARTA Microbattery is the H2 family of hydrogen gas generating cells.  The button cells offer an energy-independent solution for the displacement of virtually any liquid, gel, paste or granule, and are engineered to provide a portable dosing solution for automatic dispensers used in  short-, medium- or long-term drug delivery systems, as well as in analytics, sensing or leakage detection applications.  

Designing an acoustic diode

November 1, 2013 11:21 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Most people know about ultrasound through its role in prenatal imaging: those grainy, grey outlines of junior constructed from reflected sound waves. A new technology called an "acoustic diode," envisioned by researchers in China's Nanjing University, may dramatically improve future ultrasound images by changing the way sound waves are transmitted.

Gene found to foster synapse formation in the brain

November 1, 2013 10:58 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Researchers at Johns Hopkins say they have found that a gene already implicated in human speech disorders and epilepsy is also needed for vocalizations and synapse formation in mice. The finding, they say, adds to scientific understanding of how language develops....

Automated system promises precise control of medically induced coma

November 1, 2013 10:36 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Putting patients with severe head injuries or persistent seizures into a medically induced coma currently requires that a nurse or other health professional constantly monitor the patient's brain activity and manually adjust drug infusion to maintain a deep state of anesthesia. Now a computer-controlled system developed by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH)...

Clock oscillator measures a mere 2.0 x 1.6 x 0.65 mm

November 1, 2013 9:28 am | Product Releases | Comments

Raltron Electronics Corp., Miami, FL has released a new clock oscillator, Model CO2016, measuring a mere 2.0 x 1.6 x 0.65 mm, further increasing Raltron’s effort  to address the worlds’ increasing demand for ever smaller components. The CO2016 fills the need for a ultra-small miniature package essential in high density PCB’s....

Dell laptop buyers make a stink over cat smell

October 31, 2013 2:53 pm | by BREE FOWLER - AP Technology Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

A noxious feline odor has some Dell customers caterwauling. People who own Dell Latitude 6430u laptops are complaining that their pricey new computers are emitting a smell similar to cat urine. Some of them said on the company's online customer forums that the odor seems to be coming from the...

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