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$14.5 million grant awarded to continue anthrax studies

August 21, 2014 9:59 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The National Institutes of Health has awarded the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation a five-year, $14.5 million grant to continue its research on anthrax and the bacteria's effects on humans. For 10 years, OMRF scientist Mark Coggeshall, Ph.D., and his colleagues have studied the human immune response to anthrax bacteria as part of NIH's Cooperative Centers for Human Immunology....

New feeding tube connectors will improve patient safety

August 21, 2014 9:31 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

New feeding tube connectors, designed by an international standards process, will be available soon and will improve patient safety. According to an invited review published in the OnlineFirst version of Nutrition in Clinical Practice (NCP), the official journal of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (A.S.P.E.N.), the new connectors will greatly reduce the occurrence of misconnection that can be harmful....

Maturing brain flips function of amygdala in regulating stress hormones

August 21, 2014 9:24 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

In contrast to evidence that the amygdala stimulates stress responses in adults, researchers at Yerkes National Primate Research Center, Emory University have found that the amygdala has an inhibitory effect on stress hormones during the early development of nonhuman primates....

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Pica in pregnant teens linked to low iron

August 21, 2014 8:44 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

In a study of 158 pregnant teenagers in Rochester, NY, nearly half engaged in pica – the craving and intentional consumption of ice, cornstarch, vacuum dust, baby powder and soap, and other nonfood items, reports a new Cornell study. Moreover, such teens had significantly lower iron levels as compared with teens who did not eat nonfood substances....

Imaging study reveals white-matter deficits in users of codeine-containing cough syrups

August 21, 2014 8:36 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

An imaging study of chronic users of codeine-containing cough syrups (CCS) has found deficits in specific regions of brain white matter and associates these changes with increased impulsivity in CCS users. Researchers used diffusuion tensor imaging (DTI) (an MR imaging technique), coupled with fractional anisotropy, to investigate the white matter integrity of chronic CCS users....

Worker bees 'know' when to invest in their reproductive future

August 20, 2014 10:32 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

When a colony of honeybees grows to about 4,000 members, it triggers an important first stage in its reproductive cycle: the building of a special type of comb used for rearing male reproductive, called drones. A team of experts from the Department of Neurobiology and Behaviour at Cornell University, led by Michael Smith, studied what starts the reproductive cycle of honeybee colonies....

Molex Dongguan China Achieves FDA Registration for Class I Medical Devices

August 20, 2014 10:25 am | by Molex Inc. | News | Comments

Molex Incorporated, a global manufacturer of electronic solutions, announced today that the Molex Dongguan, China facility is now registered with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) as a compliant manufacturer of Class I medical devices. 

Abusive leadership infects entire team

August 20, 2014 10:25 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Supervisors who are abusive to individual employees can actually throw the entire work team into conflict, hurting productivity, finds new research led by a Michigan State University business scholar. The study, conducted in China and the United States, suggests the toxic effect of nonphysical abuse by a supervisor is much broader than believed....

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Research paves way for development of cyborg moth 'biobots'

August 20, 2014 9:47 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

North Carolina State University researchers have developed methods for electronically manipulating the flight muscles of moths and for monitoring the electrical signals moths use to control those muscles. The work opens the door to the development of remotely-controlled moths, or "biobots," for use in emergency response....

Guiding Stars

August 20, 2014 9:24 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Can nutrition rating systems be used in supermarkets to encourage healthier spending habits? A new study by Cornell University researchers sought to answer that very question by tracking the purchasing records in a supermarket chain that uses the Guiding Stars System to rate the nutritional value of foods for sale....

Is China's 50 percent cesarean section delivery rate too high?

August 20, 2014 9:19 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

China has one of the highest caesarean delivery rates in the world. Of 16 million babies born in 2010, approximately half were by caesarean. Although the exact rate is not known, the current Chinese language literature on caesarean rates in China reports total caesarean rates ranging from 36% to 58%....

Review of clinical treatment of bronchiolitis in infants reveals over-reliance on one test

August 20, 2014 9:15 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

An editorial published in this week's JAMA highlights the importance of physicians using all available clinical assessment tools when considering how to treat patients. Written by Robert Vinci, MD, chief of pediatrics at Boston Medical Center and chair of pediatrics at Boston University School of Medicine....

Thin-film chip resistors offer resistance values from 24.9 ohms to 100K ohms

August 19, 2014 4:20 pm | Stackpole Electronics, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

The RNCF Series thin film chip resistors from Stackpole (Raleigh, NC) offer a wide resistance range in tight tolerance and low TCR precision. Resistance values from 24.9 ohms to 100K ohms are available in the 2010 and 2512 sizes in 0.01% tolerances and +/- 5 ppm TCR....

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Graphene rubber bands could stretch limits of current healthcare, new research finds

August 19, 2014 8:52 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Although body motion sensors already exist in different forms, they have not been widely used due to their complexity and cost of production. Now researchers from the University of Surrey and Trinity College Dublin have for the first time treated common elastic bands with graphene....

US won't reveal records on health website security

August 19, 2014 8:45 am | by JACK GILLUM, Associated Press | News | Comments

After promising not to withhold government information over "speculative or abstract fears," the Obama administration has concluded it will not publicly disclose federal records that could shed light on the security of the government's health care website because doing so could "potentially" allow hackers to break in....

The connected hospital

August 19, 2014 8:36 am | by Laird | Videos | Comments

The connected hospital is a vision of a fully integrated hospital where wireless technology allows care givers and patients to roam throughout the hospital while providing accurate and timely monitoring. The Connected Hospital collects the data in a way that improves efficiency....

Career advice from the ECN engineers

August 12, 2014 10:23 am | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor | Blogs | Comments

A few months ago, we asked our engineers (that’s you guys) a few questions about how you felt about retirement, engineering, and the future of the industry. (Check out the infographic or the Whiteboard in our August issue.) While we learned a lot from our experienced engineers (turns out most are happy with their careers), we also asked for some advice for engineers in the future.

Don’t let ‘selfies’ define your self-worth

August 8, 2014 9:49 am | by A.J. Watts, Editorial Intern | Blogs | Comments

Don’t get me wrong:  I like taking an occasional selfie every once in a while. Everyone likes to use their front camera when there isn’t a nearby mirror, just to check themselves out a little bit from time to time. There is absolutely nothing wrong with a selfie, but people are getting a little carried away with these DIY pictures....

Expert insights on in vitro alternatives for drug and chemical toxicity testing

August 8, 2014 8:57 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

In vitro toxicity testing is rapidly being adopted in the pharmaceutical, chemical, and cosmetics industries, for example, as an alternative to animal studies to predict adverse health effects of drugs and personal care products and the health consequences of environmental exposures....

Is technology making our youth dumber?

August 8, 2014 8:09 am | by A.J. Watts, Editorial Intern | Blogs | Comments

I have little 2-3 year-old cousins that have the ability to use and comfortably navigate their way around a smart phone or a tablet. It is incredible to see how technology that takes older adults a longtime to figure out comes so natural to them. Just witnessing how much things have changed since I was younger is mind-blowing....

How critically ill infants can benefit most from human milk

August 7, 2014 9:16 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Human milk is infant food, but for sick, hospitalized babies, it's also medicine. That's the central premise of a series of articles in a neonatal nursing journal's special issue focused on human milk for sick newborns. The articles are being published during World Breastfeeding Week, Aug. 1-7, 2014....

Acute psychological stress promotes skin healing in mice

August 7, 2014 9:05 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Brief, acute psychological stress promoted healing in mouse models of three different types of skin irritations, in a study led by UC San Francisco researchers. The scientists found that healing was brought about by the anti-inflammatory effects of glucocorticoids – steroid hormones – produced by the adrenal glands in response to stress....

Pancreatic survival rates at standstill for 4 decades

August 7, 2014 9:01 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Long-term survival from pancreatic cancer has failed to improve in 40 years – with the outlook remaining the lowest of the 21 most common cancers, according to new figures published by Cancer Research UK today. Today just over three per cent of pancreatic cancer patients survive for at least five years, only a fraction more than the two per cent who survived that long in the early 1970s....

A new way to model cancer

August 7, 2014 8:57 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Sequencing the genomes of tumor cells has revealed thousands of mutations associated with cancer. One way to discover the role of these mutations is to breed a strain of mice that carry the genetic flaw — but breeding such mice is an expensive, time-consuming process....

Programmable power supplies test battery-powered devices, low power semiconductors

August 6, 2014 4:40 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Keithley Instruments (Cleveland, OH) introduced the Series 2280S precision measurement, low noise, programmable DC power supplies featuring the speed and dynamic range essential for measuring standby current loads....

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