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Photos of the Day: 'Bionic man' walks, breathes with artificial parts

October 14, 2013 8:56 am | by BARBARA ORTUTAY, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Gentlemen, we can rebuild him, after all. We have the technology. The term "bionic man" was the stuff of science fiction in the 1970s, when a popular TV show called "The Six Million Dollar Man" chronicled the adventures of Steve Austin, a former astronaut whose body was rebuilt using artificial parts after he nearly died.

New strategy lets cochlear implant users hear music

October 11, 2013 11:23 am | by University of Washington | News | Comments

For many, music is a universal language that unites people when words cannot. But for those who use cochlear implants – technology that allows deaf and hard of hearing people to comprehend speech – hearing music remains extremely challenging.University of Washington scientists hope to change this.

Photos of the Day: Nobel physics: A closer look at the Higgs boson

October 11, 2013 10:39 am | by FRANK JORDANS, Associated Press | News | Comments

So what is the Higgs boson, the elusive particle that physicists Peter Higgs and Francois Englert theorized about and won the Nobel Prize for on Tuesday? The subatomic particle - which has also been called the "God particle" by some because it is seen as fundamental to the creation of the universe....

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Northwestern researchers develop compact, high-power terahertz source at room temperature

October 10, 2013 1:07 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

radiation in the wavelength range of 30 to 300 microns — is gaining attention due to its applications in security screening, medical and industrial imaging, agricultural inspection, astronomical research, and other areas. Traditional methods of generating terahertz radiation, however, usually involve large and expensive instruments....

Inductance-to-digital converter is presented as industry’s first for position and motion sensing

October 10, 2013 10:28 am | Texas Instruments | Product Releases | Comments

Texas Instruments unveiled what it asserts is the industry’s first inductance-to-digital converter (LDC), a data converter category that uses coils and springs as inductive sensors. This contactless sensing technology can be used to measure the position, motion, or composition of a metal or conductive

Poetry is like music to the mind, scientists prove

October 9, 2013 3:38 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

New brain imaging technology is helping researchers to bridge the gap between art and science by mapping the different ways in which the brain responds to poetry and prose.Scientists at the University of Exeter used state-of-the-art functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) technology....

3 win Nobel chemistry prize for cyber experiments

October 9, 2013 1:22 pm | by KARL RITTER & MALIN RISING, Associated Press | News | Comments

Three U.S.-based scientists won this year's Nobel Prize in chemistry on Wednesday for developing powerful computer models that others can use to understand complex chemical interactions and create new drugs. Research in the 1970s has helped scientists develop programs that unveil chemical processes...

RF transceiver includes frequency-hopping spread spectrum technology

October 9, 2013 11:12 am | Laird Technologies | Product Releases | Comments

Laird announced the release of the CL024 transceiver from its Embedded Wireless Solutions unit. The CL024 transceiver is a Frequency Hopping Spread Spectrum (FHSS) radio designed for license-free operation in the 2.4 GHz Industrial, Scientific and Medical (ISM) band.

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Instrument measures powder flow and density

October 8, 2013 12:47 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The widespread use of powders in the pharmaceutical industry has led to a proliferation of test methods for measuring powder flow and density. The BEP2 is an easy-to-use, small-footprint instrument that provides a cost effective method for measuring the flowability of powders....

Precision signal viewing

October 8, 2013 12:16 pm | by Joel Woodward, Agilent Technologies | Keysight Technologies | Articles | Comments

The need for seeing additional current and voltage detail is increasing.  Many scope users want better ability to see small signal changes on a large signal (high dynamic range measurements). Power rails, biomedical technology developed to interact with human physiology, high-energy physics experiments that produce small pulses....

Social transformation and the digital age

October 7, 2013 3:34 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Montréal will host the 2nd World Social Science Forum that will bring together more than 750 experts from all spheres of social sciences and other disciplines. This year, delegates will address how digital technologies influence different aspects of social life, as well as how they transform social sciences.

Wireless power receiver simplifies contactless battery charging across a 1.2cm air gap

October 7, 2013 2:15 pm | Linear Technology Corporation | Product Releases | Comments

Linear Technology Corporation introduces the LTC4120, a first for the company in the wireless battery charging space. The LTC4120 combines a wireless power receiver with a constant-current/constant-voltage battery charger, functioning as the receive circuit component in a complete wireless power transfer system....

5 achievements that haven't won a Nobel Prize

October 7, 2013 11:02 am | by MALIN RISING, Associated Press | News | Comments

The announcements of this year's Nobel Prize winners will start Monday with the medicine award and continue with physics, chemistry, literature, peace and economics. The secretive award committees never give away any hints in advance of who could win, but here's a look at five big scientific breakthroughs that haven't yet received a Nobel prize.

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Photos of the Day: Seamless photography: Using mathematical models for image stitching

October 3, 2013 9:14 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A photo captures only as much as the camera in use will allow, and is therefore limited by the field of view of the camera's lens. In the case of smartphones and many advanced cameras, the view from the lens is much smaller than the view from your own eyes. Panoramic photographs were invented to capture large objects or scenes that could not otherwise fit....

China recycling cleanup jolts global industry

October 3, 2013 2:24 am | by JOE McDONALD - AP Business Writer - Associated Press | News | Comments

China for years has welcomed the world's trash, creating a roaring business in recycling and livelihoods for tens of thousands. Now authorities are clamping down on an industry that has helped the rich West dispose of its waste but also added to the degradation of China's environment. The Chinese...

Minutes, lives saved using litter assist in mine-resistant ambulances

October 2, 2013 12:00 am | by U.S. Army | News | Comments

The Medical Support Systems Project Management Office at the U.S. Army Medical Materiel Development Activity works with military, government and industry partners to improve equipment and evacuation capabilities, giving minutes back, saving lives....

UW engineers invent programming language to build synthetic DNA

September 30, 2013 5:01 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Similar to using Python or Java to write code for a computer, chemists soon could be able to use a structured set of instructions to "program" how DNA molecules interact in a test tube or cell. A team led by the University of Washington has developed a programming language for chemistry....

Engineering Newswire 57: DARPA's experimental program sends drones to space

September 30, 2013 9:23 am | by Eric Sorensen, Coordinator of Multimedia Development | Videos | Comments

Today on Engineering Newswire, we're microwaving rubble, expanding access to space, designing elastic OLEDs, and flying tinker toys to space. This episode features: DARPA has come up with a new experimental space program -- XS-1 -- which aims to develop a fully reusable, unmanned vehicle that would provide aircraft-like access to space.

3-D models of electrical streamers

September 27, 2013 4:27 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Streamers may be great for decorating a child's party, but in dielectrics, they are the primary origin of electric breakdown. They can cause catastrophic damage to electrical equipment, harm the surrounding environment, and lead to large-scale power outages. Understanding streamers and the mechanisms behind their initiation, acceleration and branching is necessary....

Researchers demonstrate 'accelerator on a chip'

September 27, 2013 4:13 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

In an advance that could dramatically shrink particle accelerators for science and medicine, researchers used a laser to accelerate electrons at a rate 10 times higher than conventional technology in a nanostructured glass chip smaller than a grain of rice.

How to make ceramics that bend without breaking

September 27, 2013 10:50 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Ceramics are not known for their flexibility: they tend to crack under stress. But researchers from MIT and Singapore have just found a way around that problem -- for very tiny objects, at least. The team has developed a way of making minuscule ceramic objects that are not only flexible, but also have a "memory" for shape...

Army developing tool to reduce altitude sickness in deployed Soldiers

September 25, 2013 12:00 am | by U.S. Army | News | Comments

It is no secret that Soldiers must prevail in all kinds of terrain and climates to complete missions. Afghanistan, for example, boasts mountains with elevations higher than 24,000 feet. Many Soldiers who have deployed to high altitudes without the proper time to adjust have learned the hard way that they are probably going to get sick.

Researchers use smart phone photography to diagnose eye disease

September 24, 2013 12:48 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Retinal (or fundus) photography is an essential part of any ophthalmology practice. Commercial fundus cameras can cost tens to hundreds of thousands of dollars, making the technology out of reach for smaller ophthalmic practices and to physicians in third-world countries.

New password in a heartbeat

September 24, 2013 12:42 pm | by Rice University | News | Comments

Pacemakers, insulin pumps, defibrillators and other implantable medical devices often have wireless capabilities that allow emergency workers to monitor patients. But these devices have a potential downside: They can be hacked. Researchers at Rice University have come up with a secure way to dramatically cut the risk...

UCLA engineers develop a stretchable, foldable transparent electronic display

September 24, 2013 12:20 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Imagine an electronic display nearly as clear as a window, or a curtain that illuminates a room, or a smartphone screen that doubles in size, stretching like rubber. Now imagine all of these being made from the same material. Researchers have developed a transparent, elastic organic light-emitting device, or OLED, that could one day make all these possible.

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