Advertisement
Medical
Subscribe to Medical
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

New study throws into question long-held belief about depression

August 27, 2014 11:01 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

New evidence puts into doubt the long-standing belief that a deficiency in serotonin — a chemical messenger in the brain — plays a central role in depression. In the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, scientists report that mice lacking the ability to make serotonin in their brains (and thus should have been "depressed" by conventional wisdom) did not show depression-like symptoms....

Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center awarded $18 million grant

August 27, 2014 10:58 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Outstanding basic research, a growing focus on translating discoveries into treatments, and a dedication to patient care have earned the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center (HICCC) of Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital an $18 million, five-year Cancer Center Support Grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI)....

The roots of human altruism

August 27, 2014 10:38 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Scientists have long been searching for the factor that determines why humans often behave so selflessly. It was known that humans share this tendency with species of small Latin American primates of the family Callitrichidae (tamarins and marmosets), leading some to suggest that cooperative care for the young, which is ubiquitous in this family, was responsible for spontaneous helping behavior....

Advertisement

Gamblers are greedy bird-brains, University of Warwick research finds

August 27, 2014 10:34 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Gamblers are greedy bird-brains, University of Warwick research finds. Gamblers show the same tendencies as pigeons when they make risky decisions, new research has shown. Researchers, led by Dr Elliot Ludvig of the University of Warwick's Department of Psychology, conducted tests that found that both human gamblers and pigeons were 35% more likely to gamble for high-value than low-value rewards....

Preclinical development of tumor therapeutic agent starts

August 27, 2014 10:23 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

There is an urgent need for medical agents to treat metastatic tumors. In case of pancreatic cancer, one of the most aggressive types of cancer that is often detected late, 95% of the patients die within five years after the diagnosis. The KIT spinoff amcure develops tumor therapeutic agents that might reduce this mortality rate....

The thunder god vine, assisted by nanotechnology, could shake up future cancer treatment

August 27, 2014 10:18 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second leading cause of cancer-associated death worldwide. These regrettably poor prognoses are due to the difficulty in treating this cancer using conventional chemotherapeutic drugs such as doxorubicin, epirubicin, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, etoposide or combinations therein....

Sleep apnea treatment is effective for older people

August 27, 2014 9:33 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Continuous positive airway pressure is effective at treating sleep apnoea in older people, a new study has found. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a condition where the walls of the throat relax and narrow during sleep, interrupting normal breathing and causing profound sleepiness....

Collaboration aims to reduce, treat vision problems in astronauts

August 27, 2014 9:17 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

To reduce and better treat spaceflight-induced visual impairment, University of Houston (UH) optometrists are collaborating on a NASA study that examines ocular changes seen in a number of astronauts. The research, developed by Heidelberg Engineering, uses Spectralis® Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), which is a technique for obtaining subsurface images of translucent or opaque materials....

Advertisement

Introducing the multi-tasking nanoparticle

August 27, 2014 9:08 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Kit Lam and colleagues from UC Davis and other institutions have created dynamic nanoparticles (NPs) that could provide an arsenal of applications to diagnose and treat cancer. Built on an easy-to-make polymer, these particles can be used as contrast agents to light up tumors for MRI and PET scans or deliver chemo and other therapies to destroy tumors....

New technology may identify tiny strains in body tissues before injuries occur

August 27, 2014 9:05 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have developed algorithms to identify weak spots in tendons, muscles and bones prone to tearing or breaking. The technology, which needs to be refined before it is used in patients, one day may help pinpoint minor strains and tiny injuries in the body's tissues long before bigger problems occur....

Breakthrough antibacterial approach could resolve serious skin infections

August 27, 2014 9:00 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Like a protective tent over a colony of harmful bacteria, biofilms make the treatment of skin infections especially difficult. Microorganisms protected in a biofilm pose a significant health risk due to their antibiotic resistance and recalcitrance to treatment, and biofilm-protected bacteria account for some 80 percent of total bacterial infections in humans....

Tilted acoustic tweezers separate cells gently

August 26, 2014 9:24 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Precise, gentle and efficient cell separation from a device the size of a cell phone may be possible thanks to tilt-angle standing surface acoustic waves, according to a team of engineers. "For biological testing we often need to do cell separation before analysis," said Tony Jun Huang, professor of engineering science and mechanics....

Revolutionary handheld DNA diagnostic unit allows lab-quality analysis in the field

August 26, 2014 9:10 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A revolutionary handheld and battery-powered DNA diagnostic device invented at New Zealand's University of Otago is poised to become a commonly used field tool for rapidly detecting suspected viruses or bacteria in samples while also determining the level of infection....

Advertisement

Eye implant developed at Stanford could lead to better glaucoma treatments

August 26, 2014 9:01 am | News | Comments

For the 2.2 million Americans battling glaucoma, the main course of action for staving off blindness involves weekly visits to eye specialists who monitor – and control – increasing pressure within the eye. Now, a tiny eye implant developed at Stanford ...

US has seen widespread adoption of robot-assisted cancer surgery to remove the prostate

August 26, 2014 8:59 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A new study reveals that the US has experienced widespread adoption of robot-assisted prostate removal surgery to treat prostate cancer in recent years. The BJU International study also found that while such surgeries are more expensive than traditional surgeries....

In our digital world, are young people losing the ability to read emotions?

August 22, 2014 9:32 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Children's social skills may be declining as they have less time for face-to-face interaction due to their increased use of digital media, according to a UCLA psychology study. UCLA scientists found that sixth-graders who went five days without even glancing at a smartphone, television or other digital screen did substantially better at reading human emotions than sixth-graders from the same school who continued to spend hours....

Space Station inspired robot to help heal sick children

August 22, 2014 9:20 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Children love robots. In all shapes, sizes, "personalities" and "smarts," these electronic wonders have been found under Christmas trees by kids and unwrapped on birthdays for years. The gift of space-inspired robotics now goes beyond toys. They are lending a helping arm to pediatric doctors for children who require intensive surgical care....

Playing hunger games: Are gamified health apps putting odds in your favor?

August 22, 2014 9:05 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

For many people, finding motivation to exercise is a challenge. Thankfully, there are Zombies chasing you. At least that's the approach of Zombies, Run!—one of more than 31,000 health and fitness apps on the market today, and one of the growing number of apps that use games to increase physical activity....

Primary care physicians can be critical resource for abused women in rural areas

August 21, 2014 4:25 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Many primary care physicians in rural communities do not routinely screen women for intimate partner violence (IPV), according to Penn State medical and public health researchers. Rural women who are exposed to such violence have limited resources if they seek help....

Laser device may end pin pricks, improve quality of life for diabetics

August 21, 2014 4:18 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Princeton University researchers have developed a way to use a laser to measure people's blood sugar, and, with more work to shrink the laser system to a portable size, the technique could allow diabetics to check their condition without pricking themselves to draw blood....

Conclusive evidence on role of circulating mesenchymal stem cells in organ injury

August 21, 2014 11:49 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are present in virtually every type of human tissue and may help in organ regeneration after injury. But the theory that MSCs are released from the bone marrow into the blood stream following organ damage, and migrate to the site of injury, has long been debated....

Feeling bad at work can be a good thing (and vice versa)

August 21, 2014 11:30 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Research by the University of Liverpool suggests that, contrary to popular opinion, it can be good to feel bad at work, whilst feeling good in the workplace can also lead to negative outcomes. In a Special Issue published in Human Relations, Dr Dirk Lindebaum from the University's Management School, together with his co-author Professor Peter Jordan, developed a new line of study, and commissioned research to further explore the role....

ADHD children make poor decisions due to less differentiated learning processes

August 21, 2014 11:25 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Which shirt do we put on in the morning? Do we drive to work or take the train? From which takeaway joint do we want to buy lunch? We make hundreds of different decisions every day. Even if these often only have a minimal impact, it is extremely important for our long-term personal development to make decisions that are as optimal as possible....

Mindfulness-based depression therapy reduces health care visits

August 21, 2014 11:21 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A mindfulness-based therapy for depression has the added benefit of reducing health-care visits among patients who often see their family doctors, according to a new study by the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) and the Institute for Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES)....

Experts: 90% of medical records are vulnerable to hackers

August 21, 2014 10:47 am | by A.J. Watts, Editorial Intern | Blogs | Comments

Many tech-savvy people take major precautions to guard themselves against hackers by encrypting their personal data and protecting their Wi-Fi at home. Sadly, hospitals and clinics haven’t taken those same precautions and are under attack by data breaches and hacking. They are being hit harder than any other industry, even more than the banking and military industries combined....

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading