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Inventor creates tiny technologies for medicine; awarded $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize

September 9, 2014 11:50 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Dr. Sangeeta Bhatia, biomedical engineer and professor at MIT, is the recipient of the 2014 $500,000 Lemelson-MIT Prize. Bhatia is recognized for designing and commercializing miniaturized technologies with applications to improve human health....

UCLA biologists delay the aging process by 'remote control'

September 9, 2014 9:38 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

UCLA biologists have identified a gene that can slow the aging process throughout the entire body when activated remotely in key organ systems. Working with fruit flies, the life scientists activated a gene called AMPK that is a key energy....

Tracing water channels in cell surface receptors

September 9, 2014 9:04 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest class of cell surface receptors in our cells, involved in signal transmission across the cell membrane. One of the biggest questions is how a signal recognized at the extracellular side of a GPCR induces a....

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Social networking can help people lose weight

September 8, 2014 4:44 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Social networking programmes designed to help people lose weight could play a role in the global fight against obesity, according to research. Analysis by researchers from Imperial College London combining the results of 12 previous studies ...

Google Glass could detect, diagnose emotion

September 8, 2014 3:40 pm | by Jason Lomberg, Digital Editor | Blogs | Comments

Well, there you go. Google Glass is more than just an ostentatious gadget for filming things, augmented reality, and generally freaking everyone out within a 50-yard radius. Actually, medical applications like BioGlass could finally move this $1,500 widget....

Brain mechanism underlying the recognition of hand gestures develops even when blind

September 5, 2014 12:39 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Does a distinctive mechanism work in the brain of congenitally blind individuals when understanding and learning others' gestures? Or does the same mechanism as with sighted individuals work? Japanese researchers figured out that activated brain regions of congenitally blind individuals ...

UCSB researchers develop ultra sensitive biosensor from molybdenite semiconductor

September 5, 2014 9:10 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Move over, graphene. An atomically thin, two-dimensional, ultrasensitive semiconductor material for biosensing developed by researchers at UC Santa Barbara promises to push the boundaries of biosensing technology in many fields, from health care to environmental protection to forensic industries....

AC-DC power modules meet protection class II

September 4, 2014 4:15 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Power Sources Unlimited, Inc. (Wrentham, MA) announces the addition of the TMM Series of medical approved AC-DC power modules that meet protection class II and are ideally suited for patient vicinity applications. The TMM Series offers three power classes....

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Isn't it time that UK family doctors embraced email services for their patients?

September 3, 2014 4:10 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The UK government sees the use of email contact and e-consultations as a means of boosting patient access to primary care and is piloting these services in 20 general practices in England. It has mandated email communication for repeat prescriptions....

Sensor development kits accelerate Internet of Things system design

September 3, 2014 9:33 am | Silicon Laboratories Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Silicon Labs (Austin, TX) introduced two development kits to accelerate the design of environmental and biometric sensing applications for a wide range of Internet of Things (IoT) products. Target applications for the kits include home security systems, smart thermostats ...

Infographic: Where are all the women in STEM?

September 3, 2014 8:00 am | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor and Eileen Whitmore, Art Director | Blogs | Comments

When it comes to women in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathethmatics) the numbers just don’t add up. Even though the number of women majoring in STEM (and attending college) has increased in the past few decades, the number of women who actually enter the fields has barely increased at all....

Reducing water scarcity possible by 2050

September 2, 2014 12:51 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Water scarcity is not a problem just for the developing world. In California, legislators are currently proposing a $7.5 billion emergency water plan to their voters; and U.S. federal officials last year warned residents of Arizona and Nevada that they could face cuts in Colorado River water deliveries in 2016....

A new synthetic amino acid for an emerging class of drugs

September 2, 2014 12:35 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

One of the greatest challenges in modern medicine is developing drugs that are highly effective against a target, but with minimal toxicity and side-effects to the patient. Such properties are directly related to the 3D structure of the drug molecule. Ideally, the drug should have a shape that is perfectly complementary to a disease-causing target, so that it binds it with high specificity....

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Nature's tiny engineers

September 2, 2014 11:57 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Conventional wisdom has long held that corals — whose calcium-carbonate skeletons form the foundation of coral reefs — are passive organisms that rely entirely on ocean currents to deliver dissolved substances, such as nutrients and oxygen. But now scientists at MIT ...

Nano-forests to reveal secrets of cells

September 2, 2014 11:40 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Vertical nanowires could be used for detailed studies of what happens on the surface of cells. The findings are important for pharmaceuticals research, among other applications. A group of researchers from Lund University in Sweden have managed to make artificial cell membranes form....

Novel 'butterfly' molecule could build new sensors, photoenergy conversion devices

August 28, 2014 9:09 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Exciting new work by a Florida State University research team has led to a novel molecular system that can take your temperature, emit white light, and convert photon energy directly to mechanical motions. And, the molecule looks like a butterfly....

Kessler Foundation scientists study impact of cultural diversity in brain injury research

August 27, 2014 4:12 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Kessler Foundation scientists examined the implications for cultural diversity and cultural competence in brain injury research and rehabilitation. The article by Anthony Lequerica, PhD, and Denise Krch, PhD: Issues of cultural diversity in acquired brain injury (ABI) rehabilitation (doi:10.3233/NRE-141079) was published by Neurorehabilitation....

Scripps Research Institute scientists link alcohol-dependence gene to neurotransmitter

August 27, 2014 4:07 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have solved the mystery of why a specific signaling pathway can be associated with alcohol dependence. This signaling pathway is regulated by a gene, called neurofibromatosis type 1 (Nf1), which TSRI scientists found is linked with excessive drinking in mice....

Kessler Foundation researchers publish first study of brain activation in MS using fNIRS

August 27, 2014 3:58 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), Kessler Foundation researchers have shown differential brain activation patterns between people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls. This is the first MS study in which brain activation was studied using fNIRS while participants performed a cognitive task....

Water 'thermostat' could help engineer drought-resistant crops

August 27, 2014 3:51 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Duke University researchers have identified a gene that could help scientists engineer drought-resistant crops. The gene, called OSCA1, encodes a protein in the cell membrane of plants that senses changes in water availability and adjusts the plant's water conservation machinery accordingly....

New smartphone app can detect newborn jaundice in minutes

August 27, 2014 2:12 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Newborn jaundice: It's one of the last things a parent wants to deal with, but it's unfortunately a common condition in babies less than a week old. Skin that turns yellow can be a sure sign that a newborn is jaundiced and isn't adequately eliminating the chemical bilirubin. But that discoloration is sometimes hard to see, and severe jaundice left untreated can harm a baby....

Educated consumers more likely to use potentially unreliable online healthcare information

August 27, 2014 2:08 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The last time you experienced worrisome medical symptoms, did you look for advice online before consulting a health-care professional? If so, you're not alone. Consumers are increasingly turning to forums, video-sharing sites, and peer support groups to gather anecdotal information and advice, which may distract them from more reliable and trustworthy sources....

Scientists plug into a learning brain

August 27, 2014 1:59 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Learning is easier when it only requires nerve cells to rearrange existing patterns of activity than when the nerve cells have to generate new patterns, a study of monkeys has found. The scientists explored the brain's capacity to learn through recordings of electrical activity of brain cell networks. The study was partly funded by the National Institutes of Health....

New study throws into question long-held belief about depression

August 27, 2014 11:01 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

New evidence puts into doubt the long-standing belief that a deficiency in serotonin — a chemical messenger in the brain — plays a central role in depression. In the journal ACS Chemical Neuroscience, scientists report that mice lacking the ability to make serotonin in their brains (and thus should have been "depressed" by conventional wisdom) did not show depression-like symptoms....

Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center awarded $18 million grant

August 27, 2014 10:58 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Outstanding basic research, a growing focus on translating discoveries into treatments, and a dedication to patient care have earned the Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center (HICCC) of Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) and NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital an $18 million, five-year Cancer Center Support Grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI)....

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