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F-35 to make Hollywood debut in Superman flick

October 16, 2012 5:32 pm | by Jason Lomberg, Technical Editor | Blogs | Comments

According to Wired, the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter — the oft-delayed, oft-maligned, “backbone of America’s tactical aviation fleet” — is set to make its big-screen debut in the Superman reboot, Man of Steel. To be sure, this won’t be the first time the JSF has appeared onscreen. A computer-generated F-35 battled The Hulk in this summer’s blockbuster hit, The Avengers.

The 10-letter keyboard that will make your head hurt

October 11, 2012 4:50 pm | by Kasey Panetta, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

The ASETNIOP keyboard is one of those things that may be great for future generations but will have a tough time integrating itself into the current workforce. The keyboard works on the premise that the traditional setup for typing is structurally inefficient, and you really only need 10 buttons to type

What equipment do you need to skydive from 120,000 feet?

October 11, 2012 8:54 am | by Kasey Panetta, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

By this point, you’ve probably heard that Felix Baumgartner is planning to skydive from 120,000 feet above the earth. For the record, that’s about 23 miles from solid ground. The jump was originally supposed to happen on October 9, but because of 14 mph wind speeds—they needed speeds of less than 2 mph to jump safely

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Prevent accidents by making your backseat disappear

October 9, 2012 11:16 am | by Kasey Panetta, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Crunch. That’s the last sound you want to hear when you’re backing up your car. It is scary. It is alarming. It is NOT a good sound.It’s the reason dashboard cams were invented. Unfortunately, the embedded cameras only show a small portion of what’s behind the car, and accidents still happen.

Why you should support improvements in electric car chargers

October 3, 2012 8:55 am | Articles | Comments

People simply don’t think of electric cars as long-distance vehicles. It’s a car to run down the street and grab some groceries, make the 15 miles commute to work or—like one of my friends—if you live in Hawaii and can’t really drive that far. It’s not an option most people think about for a regular car.

10 must-see posts from September

October 1, 2012 12:28 pm | by The ECN Editors | Articles | Comments

Here’s a rundown of the most read, most popular, most awesome articles for September. They all come with a witty, engaging summary just in case you missed them the first time or want to check up on an old favorite. Keep checking out the Lead and follow us on twitter @ecnmagazine for our most up-to-date articles.

Would you use a dissolvable medical implant?

September 28, 2012 2:08 pm | by Kasey Panetta, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Part of the problem with implanted medical devices -- for example a birth control, drug delivery device like Implanon and Nexplanon -- is that eventually, they must be removed. This is proving particularly difficult with the Implanon and Nexplanon, as occasionally fibrous sheath

How a space hater becomes a space junkie

September 26, 2012 8:55 am | by Kasey Panetta, Associate Editor, Space Nerd | Articles | Comments

Space has never really interested me. When I was forced to go to a Star Trek museum at age 10 and a man dressed as a Klingon--the fictional warrior race--chased me around the gift shop, I was pretty much done with how “fun” space could be.

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This app could save your teen driver’s life

September 25, 2012 9:26 am | by Kasey Panetta, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

We’ve all seen it. You’re driving down the road and see someone driving erratically only to find that person is messing with the radio, yelling at their reprobate children, shaving, eating, or applying makeup. Distracted driving has taken on an entirely new meaning with the advent of texting.

Incandescent ban evokes nanny state

September 18, 2012 8:50 am | by Jason Lomberg, Technical Editor | Articles | Comments

I've never thought of incandescents as dangerous contraband, but beginning September 30th, the Edison light bulb will be analogous with moonshine liquor and mind-altering drugs. Absent legislative action (which caused this mess in first place), this quintessential lighting technology faces mandatory retirement.

Can technology force you to relax?

September 14, 2012 9:10 am | by Kasey Panetta, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

In today’s world we’re all guilty of multi-tasking. We talk on the phone while we drive to work. We check email while eating breakfast. We read a book on the treadmill. There are just too many things to do and too few hours in the day. Sometimes you have to be reminded to stop

When smart cars get street smart

September 13, 2012 8:47 am | by Chris Warner, Executive Editor | Articles | Comments

In recent years, there’s been a lot of buzz about automotive infotainment systems — features that are built into recent model cars that can offer anything from satellite navigation, DVD players, internet access and more. This has led to concern from regulators about driver inattention and its impact on safety.

Bike alone? You need this helmet sensor

September 11, 2012 4:12 pm | by Kasey Panetta, Associate Editor | Blogs | Comments

As a naturally clumsy person, I’m all about using technology to improve safety, whether it’s in a car or on a motorcycle. If there was a device that would beep before my knee collided with a desk, cubicle wall, low table, or other immovable object, I would own 12.

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Getting in your head

September 11, 2012 10:54 am | by Jeff Reinke, Editorial Director | Articles | Comments

Professor Edward S. Boyden is probably one of the few individuals on the planet who is actually best described as a brainiac. Currently serving as the principal investigator at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Synthetic Neurobiology Group, Boyden’s mission is to develop tools for controlling and observing the dynamic circuits of the brain.

Twitter politics: How social media impacts presidential elections

September 10, 2012 5:28 pm | by Jason Lomberg, Technical Editor | Articles | Comments

The news that President Barack Obama's acceptance speech at the Democratic National Convention was the "biggest political moment ever" on Twitter isn’t exactly surprising, but it’s worth taking a look at how social media influences political contests.

10 must-see posts from August

September 6, 2012 4:23 pm | by Editors | Blogs | Comments

Here’s a rundown of the most read, most popular, most awesome articles for August. They all come with a witty, engaging summary just in case you missed them the first time or want to check up on an old favorite. Keep checking out the Lead and follow us on twitter @ecnmagazine for our most up-to-date articles.

End your parking woes with this foldable car

September 5, 2012 3:12 pm | by Kasey Panetta, Associate Editor | Blogs | Comments

Anyone who has ever lived in a city knows what it feels like to drive around attempting to find street parking before giving up and dumping the car in an expensive garage. If you frequently suffer from No Parking Spaces Syndrome (or NPSS)...

A guide to enjoying the (inevitable) robot takeover

August 30, 2012 11:02 am | by Kasey Panetta, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Let's face it: Robots are better than people.They’re more dependable than humans (i.e. no sick days), they’re usually cheaper, and they don’t complain. The downside is pretty obvious as well, at least with the primitive robots we have today:

Pieces from classic sci-fi dystopias are falling into place

August 29, 2012 12:52 pm | Articles | Comments

On June 5, the literary world lost a true legend with the passing of Ray Bradbury. His death – along with some recent events here in local news – got me thinking back to my teenage years where his masterpiece Fahrenheit 451 was required reading at my high school along with George Orwell’s Nineteen Eighty-Four (and I’d be remiss if I didn’t italicize titles of literary works when thinking about my high school English-Lit teacher).

Why Nikola Tesla deserves a museum

August 27, 2012 9:52 am | by Kasey Panetta, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

Nikola Tesla is arguably one of the most underappreciated scientists in history. He was a very cool, brilliant guy, but money wasn’t really his strong suit. He built a laboratory called the Wardenclyffe Tower in Shoreham, New York, which he lost due to his financial problems. The tower that Wardenclyffe was named for was destroyed in 1917, 15 years after it was built.

Would you eat printed meat?

August 21, 2012 1:56 pm | by Kasey Panetta, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

3D printing is a hot topic issue in the tech world with everything from printed guns to printed arms making headlines around the world.The newest 3D item to hit the scene? Printed meat. Modern Meadows,a firm looking to develop “high value, food grade animal protein”

Would you trust brakes that think for you?

August 14, 2012 11:34 am | by Kasey Panetta, Associate Editor | Articles | Comments

In keeping with the vehicle safety theme I’ve self-cultivated with Signal and the inflatable seatbelt, let’s take a look at the world of brakes, specifically Automatic Emergency Braking Systems (AEBS). The idea behind AEBS is that in the event that you, the driver, are unable or incapable of braking in order to avoid a collision with a car, pedestrian, object, your garage door, etc. the car will take (complete or partial) control...

Internet sales tax could foster anti-business climate

August 14, 2012 10:44 am | by Jason Lomberg, Technical Editor | Articles | Comments

The prospect of an Internet sales tax has hung over the head of e-commerce like the Sword of Damocles. It’s the boogeyman that threatens to pull the World Wide Web into the stone age of brick-and-mortar. But the ugly rumors may finally be true. A bill under consideration in the Senate would impose an Internet sales tax and amend any “competitive” disparity. Prepare to spend a lot more for your online purchases.

NI deploys LabVIEW and CompactRIO in wake of Fukushima nuclear disaster

August 8, 2012 10:19 pm | by Jason Lomberg, Technical Editor | Articles | Comments

One of the more unique applications of National Instruments’ LabVIEW design platform was its recent deployment during the Fukushima nuclear disaster. In conjunction with Kyoto University, NI created the Kyoto University RAdiation MApping (KURAMA) system, which measured gamma rays in the Fukushima Prefecture. At NI Week 2012, I learned more about this intriguing development.

Not for green technology, but for country

August 3, 2012 3:16 pm | by Clara Ennist, Editorial Intern | Blogs | Comments

When building better weapons, a focus on green technology is untenable; rather, weapons need to be accurate, cost effective, and pose the least harm to US soldiers. How “green” a weapon is can be an unintended, positive consequence. Enter the Navy’s Electromagnetic Rail Gun (EMRG) with guided munitions.

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