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Brain mechanism underlying the recognition of hand gestures develops even when blind

September 5, 2014 12:39 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Does a distinctive mechanism work in the brain of congenitally blind individuals when understanding and learning others' gestures? Or does the same mechanism as with sighted individuals work? Japanese researchers figured out that activated brain regions of congenitally blind individuals ...

Atomically thin material opens door for integrated nanophotonic circuits

September 5, 2014 10:29 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A new combination of materials can efficiently guide electricity and light along the same tiny wire, a finding that could be a step towards building computer chips capable of transporting digital information at the speed of light. Reporting today in The Optical Society's (OSA) high-impact journal Optica, optical and material scientists at the University of Rochester and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich....

UCSB researchers develop ultra sensitive biosensor from molybdenite semiconductor

September 5, 2014 9:10 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Move over, graphene. An atomically thin, two-dimensional, ultrasensitive semiconductor material for biosensing developed by researchers at UC Santa Barbara promises to push the boundaries of biosensing technology in many fields, from health care to environmental protection to forensic industries....

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Climate-smart agriculture requires three-pronged global research agenda

September 5, 2014 8:48 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Faced with climate change and diminishing opportunities to expand productive agricultural acreage, the world needs to invest in a global research agenda addressing farm and food systems, landscape and regional issues and institutional and policy matters if it is to meet the growing worldwide demand for food, fiber and fuel, suggests an international team of researchers....

Argonne scientists pioneer strategy for creating new materials

September 2, 2014 12:46 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Making something new is never easy. Scientists constantly theorize about new materials, but when the material is manufactured it doesn't always work as expected. To create a new strategy for designing materials, scientists at the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory combined two different approaches at two different facilities to synthesize new materials....

Scientists get set for simulated nuclear inspection

September 2, 2014 12:37 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Some 40 scientists and technicians from around the world will descend on Jordan in November to take part in a simulated on-site inspection of a suspected nuclear test site on the banks of the Dead Sea. Playing the part of inspectors, the experts will have access to a wide range of sensor technologies to look for signs of whether a nuclear explosion has taken place....

Accounting for biological aggregation in heating and imaging of magnetic nanoparticles

September 2, 2014 12:09 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Biological aggregation is a critical, yet often overlooked factor in the medical application of nanoparticles. Here we systematically characterize the effects of aggregation on both radiofrequency heating and magnetic resonance image (MRI) contrast of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs), including detailed analysis of the aggregate morphologies based on quasi-fractal descriptions....

Experiments explain why some liquids are 'fragile' and others are 'strong'

August 28, 2014 9:13 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Only recently has it become possible to accurately "see" the structure of a liquid. Using X-rays and a high-tech apparatus that holds liquids without a container, Kenneth Kelton, PhD, the Arthur Holly Compton Professor in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, was able to compare the behavior of glass-forming liquids as they approach the glass transition....

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Two Ames Laboratory scientists named 'Most Influential Scientific Minds'

August 28, 2014 9:01 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Two Ames Laboratory physicists, Paul Canfield and Sergey Bud'ko, were recently named to Thomson Reuters' World's Most Influential Scientific Minds 2014. Researchers earned inclusion on the list by writing the greatest number of highly cited papers, ranking among the top 1 percent for their subject field and year of publication between 2002 and 2012....

Time Warner Cable says widespread outages are largely resolved, still investigating cause

August 27, 2014 4:20 pm | by MAE ANDERSON AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Time Warner Cable said Wednesday that service was largely restored after a problem during routine maintenance caused a nationwide outage of its Internet service for hours. The company said it is still investigating the cause of the problem, which occurred with its Internet backbone - the paths that local or regional networks connect to in order to carry data long distances....

Scripps Research Institute scientists link alcohol-dependence gene to neurotransmitter

August 27, 2014 4:07 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have solved the mystery of why a specific signaling pathway can be associated with alcohol dependence. This signaling pathway is regulated by a gene, called neurofibromatosis type 1 (Nf1), which TSRI scientists found is linked with excessive drinking in mice....

University of Utah biologist wins Turkey's top science prize

August 27, 2014 2:37 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

University of Utah biologist Çagan Sekercioglu, who campaigns to save wetlands in his native Turkey, has won that nation's highest science prize, which is similar to the U.S. National Medal of Science. Sekercioglu is among five researchers picked for 2014 the top awards by TUBITAK, the Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey....

Preclinical development of tumor therapeutic agent starts

August 27, 2014 10:23 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

There is an urgent need for medical agents to treat metastatic tumors. In case of pancreatic cancer, one of the most aggressive types of cancer that is often detected late, 95% of the patients die within five years after the diagnosis. The KIT spinoff amcure develops tumor therapeutic agents that might reduce this mortality rate....

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The thunder god vine, assisted by nanotechnology, could shake up future cancer treatment

August 27, 2014 10:18 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second leading cause of cancer-associated death worldwide. These regrettably poor prognoses are due to the difficulty in treating this cancer using conventional chemotherapeutic drugs such as doxorubicin, epirubicin, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, etoposide or combinations therein....

Coal's continued dominance must be made more vivid in climate change accounting

August 27, 2014 10:11 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The world's accounting system for carbon emissions, run by the United Nations, disregards capital investments in future coal-fired and natural-gas power plants that will commit the world to several decades and billions of tons of greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new study from Princeton University and the University of California-Irvine published Aug. 26 in the journal Environmental Research Letters....

5 UC Riverside scientists among world's most influential scientific minds

August 26, 2014 9:46 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Thomson Reuters, a leading source of information for businesses and professionals, has included five researchers at the University of California, Riverside in its 2014 list of "some of the best and brightest minds of our times." To generate the list, the company analyzed citation data over 11 years (2002-2012) to identify researchers whose published work has had enormous impact....

ZigBee in the sky

August 26, 2014 9:42 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A team of engineers from Singapore has successfully piloted the world's first ZigBee wireless sensor network (WSN) for satellite communications. With the weight of payloads being a major constraint in satellite design, constructing a lightweight, low power-consuming ...

To deter cyberattacks, build a public-private partnership

August 26, 2014 9:19 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Cyberattacks loom as an increasingly dire threat to privacy, national security and the global economy, and the best way to blunt their impact may be a public-private partnership between government and business, researchers say. But the time to act is now, rather than in the wake of a crisis, says a University of Illinois expert in law and technology....

New process helps overcome obstacles to produce renewable fuels and chemicals

August 26, 2014 9:12 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

There's an old saying in the biofuels industry: "You can make anything from lignin except money." But now, a new study may pave the way to challenging that adage. The study from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) demonstrates a concept that provides opportunities for the successful conversion of lignin into a variety of renewable fuels....

Photon speedway puts big data in the fast lane

August 26, 2014 8:56 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A series of experiments conducted by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) researchers is shedding new light on the photosynthetic process. The work also illustrates how light sources and supercomputing facilities can be linked via a "photon science speedway" as a solution to emerging challenges in massive data analysis....

A breakthrough in imaging gold nanoparticles to atomic resolution by electron microscopy

August 22, 2014 11:20 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Nanometre-scale gold particles are intensively investigated for application as catalysts, sensors, drug delivery devices, biological contrast agents and components in photonics and molecular electronics. Gaining knowledge of their atomic-scale structures, fundamental for understanding physical and chemical properties, has been challenging....

Tech Tips: Sprint's new plans offer savings, though advantages shrink for families with kids

August 22, 2014 9:38 am | by ANICK JESDANUN AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

In revamping its prices and plans this week, Sprint is joining Verizon and AT&T in letting families share pools of data. The new Sprint plans are available starting Friday and reward families that need a lot of data. But the company is also keeping an unlimited-data plan that's beneficial for individuals - and competes with a similar T-Mobile offering....

AAAS: Sri Lanka images show no significant increase in public facilities, despite promises

August 21, 2014 11:10 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Thousands of Sri Lankans remain refugees five years after a long civil war, and satellite-image analysis seems to reveal many new housing-like structures and development in a military zone in the northern part of the country. However, the analysis also shows no significant increase in civic facilities despite government claims that it has seized the land for public use....

For secure software: X-rays instead of passport control

August 21, 2014 10:27 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Trust is good, control is better. This also applies to the security of computer programs. Instead of trusting "identification documents" in the form of certificates, JOANA, the new software analysis tool, examines the source text (code) of a program....

$14.5 million grant awarded to continue anthrax studies

August 21, 2014 9:59 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The National Institutes of Health has awarded the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation a five-year, $14.5 million grant to continue its research on anthrax and the bacteria's effects on humans. For 10 years, OMRF scientist Mark Coggeshall, Ph.D., and his colleagues have studied the human immune response to anthrax bacteria as part of NIH's Cooperative Centers for Human Immunology....

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