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Japan energy storage subsidies to spark market growth

March 19, 2014 11:44 am | by Sam Wilkinson, IHS research manager for Energy Storage | News | Comments

The introduction of subsidies for consumers and businesses installing energy storage in Japan and Germany is forecast to spark a drive to install the systems and help drive down costs just as they did for the solar PV industry over the past decade.

Researchers devise new, stretchable antenna for wearable health monitoring

March 19, 2014 10:35 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new, stretchable antenna that can be incorporated into wearable technologies, such as health monitoring devices. “Many researchers have developed prototype sensors for wearable health systems, but there was a clear need....

Hold that RT: Much misinformation tweeted after 2013 Boston Marathon bombing

March 19, 2014 10:13 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

It takes only a fraction of a second to hit the retweet button on Twitter. But if thousands of people all retweet at once, a piece of information 140 characters long can go viral almost instantly in today’s Internet landscape. If that information is incorrect, especially in a crisis, it’s hard for the social media community to gain control and push out accurate information, new research shows.

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Sauder research shows why innovation takes a nosedive

March 19, 2014 9:04 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A new UBC study reveals that corporate leaders are victims of herd mentality when adopting new innovations, sometimes with deadly consequences. The paper, by Sauder School of Business Associate Professor Marc-David L. Seidel and INSEAD Professor Henrich R. Greve, shows leaders tend to pursue innovations, even as complex as airplanes, based on early adoption by competitors not close scrutiny of the technical merits.

Reducing anxiety with a smartphone app

March 19, 2014 8:57 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Playing a science-based mobile gaming app for 25 minutes can reduce anxiety in stressed individuals, according to research published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The study suggests that “gamifying” a scientifically-supported intervention...

A new algorithm improves the efficiency of small wind turbines

March 18, 2014 11:16 am | by eurekalert! | News | Comments

In recent years, mini wind energy has been developing in a spectacular way. According to estimates by the WWEA-World Wind Energy Association, the level of development of the mini wind energy industry is not the same as that of the wind energy industry, although forecasts are optimistic.

Researchers Devise New, Stretchable Antenna for Wearable Health Monitoring

March 18, 2014 11:13 am | by eurekalert! | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new, stretchable antenna that can be incorporated into wearable technologies, such as health monitoring devices. The extremely flexible antennas contain silver nanowires and can be incorporated into wearable health monitoring devices.

Reducing Anxiety With a Smartphone App

March 18, 2014 11:10 am | by eurekalert! | News | Comments

Playing a science-based mobile gaming app for 25 minutes can reduce anxiety in stressed individuals, according to research published in Clinical Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. The study suggests that “gamifying” a scientifically-supported intervention could offer measurable mental health and behavioral benefits for people with relatively high levels of anxiety.

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Photos of the Day: Introducing supersonic passenger planes

March 18, 2014 9:23 am | by NASA | News | Comments

The level of concern over sonic boom annoyance became so significant that the Federal Aviation Administration prohibited domestic civil supersonic flight over land in 1973. This prohibition helped quiet the skies and reduce potential impacts on the environment. However, it also dashed hopes of introducing supersonic overland passenger service within U.S. airspace during the Concorde era.

Knowing whether food has spoiled without even opening the container

March 17, 2014 4:24 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A color-coded smart tag could tell consumers whether a carton of milk has turned sour or a can of green beans has spoiled without opening the containers, according to researchers. The tag, which would appear on the packaging, also could be used to determine if medications and other perishable products were still active or fresh, they said.

Stanford makes flexible carbon nanotube circuits more reliable and power efficient

March 17, 2014 4:15 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Engineers would love to create flexible electronic devices, such as e-readers that could be folded to fit into a pocket. One approach they are trying involves designing circuits based on electronic fibers, known as carbon nanotubes (CNTs), instead of rigid silicon chips.

Harnessing everyday motion to power mobile devices

March 17, 2014 12:13 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Imagine powering your cell phone by simply walking around your office or rubbing it with the palm of your hand. Rather than plugging it into the wall, you become the power source. Researchers at the 247th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS), the world's largest scientific society, presented these commercial possibilities and a unique vision for green energy.

Finding the next Steve Jobs

March 17, 2014 11:52 am | by Chris Fox, PDD Managing Editor | Blogs | Comments

3D printing isn’t new, especially to the engineering community, but it can’t be denied that additive manufacturing has been under the marketing spotlight in the last 18 months. That’s why Luis Lopez and Clay Tweel found themselves working on an indie-documentary featuring some of the biggest “little” companies in 3D printing.

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US government ceding control of key Internet body

March 17, 2014 8:55 am | by Michael Liedtke, AP Technology Writer | Articles | Comments

The U.S. government is relinquishing its control of the Internet's address system in a shift that may raise questions about the future direction of online innovation and communications. The decision announced Friday begins a long-planned transition affecting the stewardship of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers, or ICANN.

Amsterdam canal house built with 3-D printer

March 17, 2014 8:49 am | by TOBY STERLING, Associated Press | Articles | Comments

Hundreds of years after wealthy merchants began building the tall, narrow brick houses that have come to define Amsterdam's skyline, Dutch architects are updating the process for the 21st century: fabricating pieces of a canal house out of plastic with a giant 3-D printer and slotting them together like oversized Lego blocks.

This technology could lower traffic fatalities by 40 percent

March 14, 2014 4:59 pm | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor | Blogs | Comments

London, like any busy city, is full of people and cars and everyone is trying to use the same roads. In order to make the systems run more efficiently, London is investing in intelligent pedestrian crossing to the tune of several billion pounds. The system, which is actually called the Pedestrian Split Cycle Offset Optimisation Technique—catchy name—or “SCOOT”...

Engineering Newswire: Phantom boat flies above the water

March 14, 2014 3:03 pm | by Alex Shanahan, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

Today on Engineering Newswire, we're 3D printing documentaries, talking toilet lights, and riding the flying phantom above the water. This episode features: Flying Phantom: Phantom International has introduced its next generation of foiling catamarans, the Flying Phantom.

Soft robotic fish moves like the real thing

March 14, 2014 10:52 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Soft robots— which don't just have soft exteriors but are also powered by fluid flowing through flexible channels —now have their own journal, Soft Robotics. MIT researchers report the first self-contained autonomous soft robot capable of rapid body motion: a "fish" that can execute an escape maneuver, convulsing its body to change direction in just a fraction of a second, or almost as quickly as a real fish can.

When big isn't better: How the flu bug bit Google

March 14, 2014 10:30 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Numbers and data can be critical tools in bringing complex issues into crisp focus. The understanding of diseases, for example, benefits from algorithms that help monitor their spread. But without context, a number may just be a number, or worse, misleading.

Creating a graphene-metal sandwich to improve electronics

March 14, 2014 10:25 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered that creating a graphene-copper-graphene “sandwich” strongly enhances the heat conducting properties of copper, a discovery that could further help in the downscaling of electronics. Researchers found that adding a layer of graphene, a one-atom thick material with highly desirable electrical, thermal and mechanical properties, on each side of a copper film increased heat conducting properties up to 24 percent.

Researchers write languages to design synthetic living systems useful for new products, health care

March 14, 2014 9:16 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Researchers at Virginia Tech and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have used a computer-aided design tool to create genetic languages to guide the design of biological systems. Known as GenoCAD, the open-source software was developed to help synthetic biologists capture biological rules to engineer organisms that produce useful products or health-care solutions from inexpensive, renewable materials.

Nanoscale optical switch breaks miniaturization barrier

March 14, 2014 9:09 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

An ultra-fast and ultra-small optical switch has been invented that could advance the day when photons replace electrons in the innards of consumer products ranging from cell phones to automobiles. The new optical device can turn on and off trillions of times per second. It consists of individual switches that are only one five-hundredth the width of a human hair (200 nanometers) in diameter. This size is much smaller than the...

Adults, don’t blame teenagers for your bad phone habits

March 14, 2014 9:01 am | by Stephanie Carmichael, Contributor | Blogs | Comments

Teenagers these days. They can’t go one minute without their cell phone. But apparently, neither can adults. A new study shows that one in three parents are using their cell phones almost nonstop during meal time at restaurants, and it’s probably safe to say this kind of behavior goes on at home, too.

Emotion detectors could make driving safer

March 14, 2014 8:57 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Technology now allows us to read facial expressions and identify which of the seven universal emotions a person is feeling: fear, anger, joy, sadness, disgust, surprise, or suspicion. This is very useful in video game development, medicine, marketing, and, perhaps less obviously, in driver safety. We know that in addition to fatigue, the emotional state of the driver is a risk factor.

Thin film filter suppresses common mode and radiation noise

March 13, 2014 10:52 am | Product Releases | Comments

Viking Tech Corporation (Irvine, CA) announces the CMF Series  CMF for “High Speed” and “Ultra High Speed” Differential Signal Lines. For suppressing common mode and radiation noise in differential signal interfaces, the CMF uses a large bandwidth that will not affect the transmission of differential signals.

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