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Audio speaker driver IC brings 3X power output to Ultrabooks

November 5, 2013 12:05 pm | Dialog Semiconductor (Dialog North America) | Product Releases | Comments

Dialog Semiconductor announced today the first product in its new range of Class D audio products, the DA7202. This powerful, highly efficient low EMI Class D speaker driver provides greater power output and improved efficiency levels for Ultrabooks, tablets and speaker accessories powered by a dual cell battery pack.

Researcher finds way to reduce unnecessary lab tests, decrease patient costs by modifying software design

November 5, 2013 11:09 am | by University of Missouri-Columbia | News | Comments

When patients undergo diagnostic lab tests as part of the inpatient admission process, they may wonder why or how physicians choose particular tests. Increasingly, medical professionals are using electronic medical systems that provide lists of lab tests from which medical professionals can choose.

A better way to track your every move

November 5, 2013 10:59 am | by Northwestern University | News | Comments

Physical activity tracking apps on smart phones are a potentially important tool for doctors who want to collect data and create treatment or intervention plans to improve the health of patients who struggle with activity and movement -- such as those with Parkinson’s disease. A new Northwestern Medicine study has found a way to make these apps more accurate...

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New computing model could lead to quicker advancements in medical research

November 5, 2013 10:50 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

With the promise of personalized and customized medicine, one extremely important tool for its success is the knowledge of a person's unique genetic profile. This personalized knowledge of one's genetic profile has been facilitated by the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS), where sequencing a genome, like the human genome, has gone from costing $95,000,000 to a mere $5,700.

What is Google building out in San Francisco Bay?

November 5, 2013 10:43 am | by MARTHA MENDOZA, AP National Writer | News | Comments

San Francisco's mayor says he doesn't know what it is. Police say it's not their jurisdiction. And government inspectors are sworn to secrecy. Google is erecting a four-story structure in the heart of the San Francisco Bay but is managing to conceal its purpose by constructing it on docked barges instead of on land, where city building permits and public plans are mandatory.

Google opens how-to shop with live video advice

November 5, 2013 10:39 am | by MICHAEL LIEDTKE, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Google is opening a how-to shop that will sell expert advice on everything from cosmetics to the cosmos in live video sessions streamed on computers and smartphones. The service, called Helpouts, will begin taking calls for help Tuesday and offer connections to more than 1,000 merchants, websites and health care specialists who cleared Google Inc.'s background checks.

Synaptic transistor learns while it computes

November 4, 2013 11:00 am | by Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences | News | Comments

It doesn't take a Watson to realize that even the world's best supercomputers are staggeringly inefficient and energy-intensive machines. Our brains have upwards of 86 billion neurons, connected by synapses that not only complete myriad logic circuits; they continuously adapt to stimuli...

Why you shouldn’t implant computer chips in your arm

November 1, 2013 3:31 pm | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor | Blogs | Comments

In general, medical implants and their components are strictly regulated by the Food and Drug Administration and for good reason. You can’t just stick anything under your skin without extreme consequences including things like major infections, pretty gnarly scaring, and potentially deadly health complications.

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Automated system promises precise control of medically induced coma

November 1, 2013 10:36 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Putting patients with severe head injuries or persistent seizures into a medically induced coma currently requires that a nurse or other health professional constantly monitor the patient's brain activity and manually adjust drug infusion to maintain a deep state of anesthesia. Now a computer-controlled system developed by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH)...

Clock oscillator measures a mere 2.0 x 1.6 x 0.65 mm

November 1, 2013 9:28 am | Product Releases | Comments

Raltron Electronics Corp., Miami, FL has released a new clock oscillator, Model CO2016, measuring a mere 2.0 x 1.6 x 0.65 mm, further increasing Raltron’s effort  to address the worlds’ increasing demand for ever smaller components. The CO2016 fills the need for a ultra-small miniature package essential in high density PCB’s....

Ultra-miniature slide switches feature a mechanical operating life of 10K cycles

October 31, 2013 4:35 pm | C&K Components | Product Releases | Comments

C&K Components has expanded its family of low-profile, cost-effective miniature slide switches. Designed for applications with significant board space and height restrictions, the PCM Series is available in SPDT and SP3T models. The PCM Series has been extensively designed into computer & computer peripheral products....

Gaming technology unravels 1 of the most complex entities in nature

October 31, 2013 1:06 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

BBSRC-funded researchers at the University of Manchester's Institute of Biotechnology have used the power of off-the-shelf computer gaming technology to capture previously unobservable atomic movements. The research is helping to chart one of nature's most complex entities known as "glycomes" - the entire complement of carbohydrates within a cell.

The world’s most powerful terahertz quantum cascade laser

October 30, 2013 12:54 pm | by Vienna University of Technology | News | Comments

Whether it is diagnostic imaging, analysis of unknown substances or ultrafast communication – terahertz radiation sources are becoming more and more important. At the Vienna University of Technology, an important breakthrough has been achieved. Terahertz waves are invisible, but incredibly useful; they can penetrate many materials...

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Future internet aims to sever links with servers

October 30, 2013 12:45 pm | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Researchers have taken the first step towards a radical new architecture for the internet, which they claim will transform the way in which information is shared online, and make it faster and safer to use. The prototype, which has been developed as part of an EU-funded project called “Pursuit”, is being put forward as a proof-of concept model...

Google expands sales of Internet-connected glasses

October 28, 2013 8:51 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif. (AP) — Google is relying on a little social networking to put its Internet-connected glasses on the heads of more people. The expanded sales of the device known as Google Glass will come as part of an invitation-only program announced Monday. The roughly 10,000 Glass owners...

Development kit provides designers with a step-by-step approach to develop 3D gesturing systems

October 28, 2013 3:18 pm | Microchip Technology Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Microchip Technology announced the new MGC3130 Hillstar Development Kit for 3D gesturing systems. The kit provides designers with an easy, step-by-step approach to develop 3D gesturing systems with Microchip’s MGC3130 and electrodes that meet their specific space requirements.

Nanomaterials database improved to help consumers, scientists track products

October 28, 2013 12:56 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Nanomaterials are the heart of the smaller, better electronics developed during the last decade, as well as new materials, medical diagnostics and therapeutics, energy storage, and clean water. However, exposure to nanomaterials may have unintended consequences for human health and the environment.

The cyber-centipede: From Linnaeus to big data

October 28, 2013 12:53 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Taxonomic descriptions, introduced by Linnaeus in 1735, are designed to allow scientists to tell one species from another. Now there is a new futuristic method for describing new species that goes far beyond the tradition. The new approach combines several techniques, including next generation molecular methods, barcoding, and novel computing and imaging technologies...

Saarbrücken physicists aim to make transition to quantum world visible

October 28, 2013 12:32 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Theoretical physicist Frank Wilhelm-Mauch and his research team at Saarland University have developed a mathematical model for a type of microscopic test lab that could provide new and deeper insight into the world of quantum particles. The new test system will enable the simultaneous study of one hundred light quanta...

ARM board is configurable and production-ready

October 24, 2013 5:10 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Direct Insight announced a flexible, production-quality ARM board, which is configurable by changing a tiny (68 mm x 26 mm) processor module - from ARM9 to quad core ARM Cortex-A9, thus offering a production solution for Linux, Windows CE and Android-based products. The TRITON-TXFB is fully

COM Express starter kit aims to accelerate the development process

October 24, 2013 4:41 pm | Sealevel Systems, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Sealevel Systems announced the 121004-KT, a QuickStart kit that provides everything design engineers need to get COM Express projects off to a fast start. Powered by a 1.8-GHz Intel Atom N2800 CPU with heat sink and 4 GB RAM, the kit includes an integrated 2.5" 32-GB solid-state disk. Standard features include

Building digital video encoding systems: What’s your approach?

October 23, 2013 2:51 pm | by Mike Perkins, Ph.D, and Mike Deeds, Cardinal Peak | Articles | Comments

Since its humble beginning more than 80 years ago in Farnsworth’s lab, video has grown to be a ubiquitous part of life. Devices like HDTVs, smartphones, and tablets coupled with services like YouTube, Netflix, and Facebook have put video near the center of most people’s lives.

Review: Refinements add up in new Mac system

October 23, 2013 1:08 pm | by ANICK JESDANUN, Associated Press | News | Comments

There isn't one thing that jumps out with Apple's new Mac operating system, known as Mavericks —and that's a good thing. Mavericks has plenty of modest refinements that add up to a system well worth the upgrade — especially because it's free. Many years ago, Web surfing changed dramatically when...

Review: New Surface tablets great for productivity

October 21, 2013 10:38 am | by BREE FOWLER, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Whether or not you like Microsoft's updated Surface tablets will depend on your needs. On one hand, the tablets can be great for working on the go, especially if you spring for a $130 keyboard cover. On the flip side, the new versions still lack the elegance and fun that iPads are known for and many Android-based tablets now offer.

Breed easy: Motion detectors aid dairy farmers

October 21, 2013 10:31 am | by M.L. JOHNSON, Associated Press | News | Comments

Every step a cow takes and every mouthful she eats at Saxon Homestead Farm is recorded by an electronic device on a collar around her neck. Since cows in heat move more and digest less, farmers can use the data to determine when to breed them. Karl Klessig, whose family has a dairy farm and cheese-making business in eastern Wisconsin, describes it as a kind of natural family planning system for bovines.

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