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Researchers awarded $1.5 million to develop software to process solar astronomy data on larger scale

September 2, 2014 11:43 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Researchers in Georgia State University's new Astroinformatics program have been awarded $1.5 million from the National Science Foundation to develop software tools that can process large sets of solar astronomy data and allow scientists to perform analyses on scales and detail levels that have not been possible....

Nano-forests to reveal secrets of cells

September 2, 2014 11:40 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Vertical nanowires could be used for detailed studies of what happens on the surface of cells. The findings are important for pharmaceuticals research, among other applications. A group of researchers from Lund University in Sweden have managed to make artificial cell membranes form....

Preventing emergencies with home automation

August 28, 2014 2:09 pm | by Christian DeFeo, eSupplier and Innovation Manager, element14 | Blogs | Comments

The engineers in the Forget Me Not Challenge are hard at work on their designs as we approach the one-month mark, and Embedit Electronics and Cypress Semiconductor recently provided them with the new RPiSoC development platform to help bring their imagined creations to life. One theme that has been consistent throughout the competition is the idea that home automation technology can prevent a household emergency.

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NASA's TRMM Satellite sees powerful towering storms in Cristobal

August 28, 2014 9:18 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

NASA's TRMM satellite identified areas of heavy rainfall occurring in Hurricane Cristobal as it continued strengthening on approach to Bermuda. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite flew above Hurricane Cristobal on August 26 at 11:35 UTC (7:35 a.m. EDT) gathering rainfall data....

Experiments explain why some liquids are 'fragile' and others are 'strong'

August 28, 2014 9:13 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Only recently has it become possible to accurately "see" the structure of a liquid. Using X-rays and a high-tech apparatus that holds liquids without a container, Kenneth Kelton, PhD, the Arthur Holly Compton Professor in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, was able to compare the behavior of glass-forming liquids as they approach the glass transition....

Novel 'butterfly' molecule could build new sensors, photoenergy conversion devices

August 28, 2014 9:09 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Exciting new work by a Florida State University research team has led to a novel molecular system that can take your temperature, emit white light, and convert photon energy directly to mechanical motions. And, the molecule looks like a butterfly....

Commoditizing the network part two: Integrating service capabilities in white box switches

August 28, 2014 9:01 am | by Sam Fuller, Freescale Semiconductor | Blogs | Comments

Software defined networking and many of the accompanying trends have revolutionized the network. In Part 1 of this series, we discussed how white box switches are driving the network to increased commoditization. The flexibility and programmability provided by white box switches ...

NASA begins hurricane mission with Global Hawk flight to Cristobal

August 28, 2014 8:57 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The first of two unmanned Global Hawk aircraft landed at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Virginia, on Aug. 27 after surveying Hurricane Cristobal for the first science flight of NASA's latest hurricane airborne mission. NASA's airborne Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel, or HS3, mission returns to NASA Wallops for the third year to investigate the processes that underlie hurricane formation and intensity change....

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Kessler Foundation scientists study impact of cultural diversity in brain injury research

August 27, 2014 4:12 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Kessler Foundation scientists examined the implications for cultural diversity and cultural competence in brain injury research and rehabilitation. The article by Anthony Lequerica, PhD, and Denise Krch, PhD: Issues of cultural diversity in acquired brain injury (ABI) rehabilitation (doi:10.3233/NRE-141079) was published by Neurorehabilitation....

Scripps Research Institute scientists link alcohol-dependence gene to neurotransmitter

August 27, 2014 4:07 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have solved the mystery of why a specific signaling pathway can be associated with alcohol dependence. This signaling pathway is regulated by a gene, called neurofibromatosis type 1 (Nf1), which TSRI scientists found is linked with excessive drinking in mice....

Rubber meets the road with new ORNL carbon, battery technologies

August 27, 2014 4:03 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Recycled tires could see new life in lithium-ion batteries that provide power to plug-in electric vehicles and store energy produced by wind and solar, say researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By modifying the microstructural characteristics of carbon black ...

Kessler Foundation researchers publish first study of brain activation in MS using fNIRS

August 27, 2014 3:58 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), Kessler Foundation researchers have shown differential brain activation patterns between people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls. This is the first MS study in which brain activation was studied using fNIRS while participants performed a cognitive task....

Water 'thermostat' could help engineer drought-resistant crops

August 27, 2014 3:51 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Duke University researchers have identified a gene that could help scientists engineer drought-resistant crops. The gene, called OSCA1, encodes a protein in the cell membrane of plants that senses changes in water availability and adjusts the plant's water conservation machinery accordingly....

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University of Utah biologist wins Turkey's top science prize

August 27, 2014 2:37 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

University of Utah biologist Çagan Sekercioglu, who campaigns to save wetlands in his native Turkey, has won that nation's highest science prize, which is similar to the U.S. National Medal of Science. Sekercioglu is among five researchers picked for 2014 the top awards by TUBITAK, the Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey....

Detecting neutrinos, physicists look into the heart of the sun

August 27, 2014 2:31 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Using one of the most sensitive neutrino detectors on the planet, an international team of physicists including Andrea Pocar, Laura Cadonati and doctoral student Keith Otis at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report in the current issue of Nature that for the first time they have directly detected neutrinos created by the "keystone" proton-proton (pp) fusion process going on at the sun's core....

Scientist uncovers red planet's climate history in unique meteorite

August 27, 2014 2:21 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Was Mars — now a cold, dry place — once a warm, wet planet that sustained life? And if so, how long has it been cold and dry? Research underway at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory may one day answer those questions — and perhaps even help pave the way for future colonization of the Red Planet....

Witnessing the early growth of a giant

August 27, 2014 2:18 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Elliptical galaxies are large, gas-poor gatherings of older stars and are one of the main types of galaxy along with their spiral and lenticular relatives. Galaxy formation theories suggest that giant elliptical galaxies form from the inside out, with a large core marking the very first stages of formation....

New smartphone app can detect newborn jaundice in minutes

August 27, 2014 2:12 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Newborn jaundice: It's one of the last things a parent wants to deal with, but it's unfortunately a common condition in babies less than a week old. Skin that turns yellow can be a sure sign that a newborn is jaundiced and isn't adequately eliminating the chemical bilirubin. But that discoloration is sometimes hard to see, and severe jaundice left untreated can harm a baby....

Educated consumers more likely to use potentially unreliable online healthcare information

August 27, 2014 2:08 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The last time you experienced worrisome medical symptoms, did you look for advice online before consulting a health-care professional? If so, you're not alone. Consumers are increasingly turning to forums, video-sharing sites, and peer support groups to gather anecdotal information and advice, which may distract them from more reliable and trustworthy sources....

MU researchers develop more accurate Twitter analysis tools

August 27, 2014 2:06 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

"Trending" topics on the social media platform Twitter show the quantity of tweets associated with a specific event. However, trends only show the highest volume keywords and hashtags, and may not give qualitative information about the tweets themselves....

NASA sees massive Marie close enough to affect southern California coast

August 27, 2014 2:03 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Two NASA satellites captured visible and infrared pictures that show the massive size of Hurricane Marie. Marie is so large that it is bringing rough surf to the southern coast of California while almost nine hundred miles west of Baja California....

Scientists plug into a learning brain

August 27, 2014 1:59 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Learning is easier when it only requires nerve cells to rearrange existing patterns of activity than when the nerve cells have to generate new patterns, a study of monkeys has found. The scientists explored the brain's capacity to learn through recordings of electrical activity of brain cell networks. The study was partly funded by the National Institutes of Health....

EuropeanPioneers: 4.5 million Euros of EU funds for startups

August 27, 2014 10:54 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Berlin/Sankt Augustin, 27th August 2014 – Over the next two years, the EU funding pogramme "EuropeanPioneers" will support 25 startups and SMEs in the European Union with a total of 4.5 million Euros. The scheme targets businesses active in the fields of Smart City Services, Social Connected TV, Pervasive Gaming and E-Learning....

NOAA's Marine Debris Program reports on the national issue of derelict fishing traps

August 27, 2014 10:42 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Thousands of fishing traps are lost or abandoned each year in U.S. waters and become what are known as derelict traps, which continue to catch fish, crabs, and other species such as turtles. These traps result in losses to habitat, fisheries, and the watermen who depend on the resources--losses that are largely preventable, according to a newly published NOAA study....

Gamblers are greedy bird-brains, University of Warwick research finds

August 27, 2014 10:34 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Gamblers are greedy bird-brains, University of Warwick research finds. Gamblers show the same tendencies as pigeons when they make risky decisions, new research has shown. Researchers, led by Dr Elliot Ludvig of the University of Warwick's Department of Psychology, conducted tests that found that both human gamblers and pigeons were 35% more likely to gamble for high-value than low-value rewards....

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