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GPU accelerator equipped with 12GB of memory

November 25, 2013 12:54 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Silicon Mechanics announces that it now offers the NVIDIA Tesla K40 GPU accelerator, the world’s fastest accelerator, as part of its GPU Solutions product line. The Tesla K40 GPU accelerator is equipped with 12GB of memory to process the world’s most challenging computational problems....

Japanese computer makers enhancing Big Data services

November 25, 2013 11:50 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Major Japanese computer makers including Fujitsu Ltd. and NEC Corp. are enhancing their respective services for Big Data, or data collected very rapidly in large volumes from a variety of sources. Since Big Data services are seen as limitless and expected to achieve high growth, the companies are offering various services to corporate clients and local governments, their officials said.

Design-specific enclosures intended for credit-card sized computers

November 25, 2013 9:31 am | Hammond | Product Releases | Comments

Hammond Manufacturing has launched a range of design-specific moulded enclosures to support the new types of credit card-sized, low-cost bar- board computers, which, typically running Linux, provide basic functionality across a wide range of applications.

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Tech issues block people from NJ online bet test

November 22, 2013 1:54 pm | by WAYNE PARRY, Associated Press | News | Comments

New Jersey is allowing adults in the state to click a mouse or swipe a screen for a chance to win money, making it only the third state to offer online gambling. A five-day trial period of Internet gambling began Thursday night when players invited by casinos to test their systems made real-money bets online.

5 Things to Know about $290 million Apple verdict

November 21, 2013 7:44 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

A jury on Thursday ordered Samsung Electronics to pay Apple $290 million for copying features of the iPhone and iPad. That was in addition to $640 million the South Korea-based Samsung already owed Apple from a previous trial. Samsung plans to appeal the $930 million in damages in a San Jose...

Carnegie Mellon computer searches web 24/7 to analyze images and teach itself common sense

November 21, 2013 11:02 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A computer program called the Never Ending Image Learner (NEIL) is running 24 hours a day at Carnegie Mellon University, searching the Web for images, doing its best to understand them on its own and, as it builds a growing visual database, gathering common sense on a massive scale.

PoL DC-DC converter ideal for powering the latest FPGAs and ASICs used in networking, telecommunications, and computing applications

November 21, 2013 10:34 am | Murata Power Solutions Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Murata announced the first in a series of Point-of- Load (PoL) non-isolated DC-DC converters based on the Digital Control Architecture from Powervation. The DOSA compatible OKLF 25A PoL has been designed to address the industry's growing requirement for low voltages (1.25V and less)....

Handheld digital storage oscilloscopes provide up to 100 MHz bandwidth

November 20, 2013 4:07 pm | B&K Precision Corporation | Product Releases | Comments

B&K Precision today announced its new 2510 Series handheld digital storage oscilloscopes (DSO). Four models make up this new line of dual-channel oscilloscopes that includes 60 MHz and 100 MHz bandwidth models in non-isolated and isolated designs.

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Photos of the Day: UT Dallas computer scientists create 3-D technique

November 19, 2013 12:30 pm | by University of Texas at Dallas | News | Comments

UT Dallas computer scientists have developed a technique to make 3-D images that finds practical applications of a theory created by a famous mathematician. This technique uses anisotropic triangles to create 3-D “mesh” computer graphics that more accurately approximate the shapes of the original objects...

Study reveals potential breakthrough in hearing technology

November 18, 2013 1:01 pm | by Ohio State University | News | Comments

Computer engineers and hearing scientists at The Ohio State University have made a potential breakthrough in solving a 50-year-old problem in hearing technology: how to help the hearing-impaired understand speech in the midst of background noise. They describe how they used the latest developments in neural networks...  

Single-atom bit forms smallest memory in the world

November 18, 2013 12:47 pm | by Helmholtz Association | News | Comments

One atom equals one bit: According to this design principle, we would like to construct magnetic data memories in the future. Presently, a compound of several million atoms is needed to stabilize a magnetic bit in a way that hard disk data are secure for several years.

UC research brings a future of mind-reading robots ever closer

November 18, 2013 11:25 am | by University of Cincinnati | News | Comments

Research on brain-computer interface will be presented at the International Human-Centered Robotics Symposium, and UC's work to pioneer a human-centered robotics curriculum will be discussed. If you think with the release of every new i-device the world is getting closer to thought-controlled smart tech and robotic personal assistants, you might be right.  

This is a real-life Batmobile

November 13, 2013 12:20 pm | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor | Blogs | Comments

The Batmobile is arguably one of the most recognizable fictional transportation devices. Its sleek design has been imagined and reimagined by every Batman movie and a few comics, but it always maintains that certain je ne sais quoi that makes it powerful, sexy, and impressive all in one.Every so often, a superfan will try to recreate the Batmobile...

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Exploring public perceptions of future wearable computing

November 8, 2013 10:24 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

As scientists develop the next wave of smartwatches and other wearable computing, they might want to continue focusing their attention on the arms and the wrists. According to a recent Georgia Tech study, portable electronic devices placed on the collar, torso, waist or pants may cause awkwardness, embarrassment or strange looks.

Slacktivism: 'Liking' on Facebook may mean less giving

November 8, 2013 9:35 am | by Eurekalert! | Blogs | Comments

Would-be donors skip giving when offered the chance to show public support for charities in social media, a new study from the University of British Columbia's Sauder School of Business finds. "Charities incorrectly assume that connecting with people through social media always leads to more meaningful support," says Sauder PhD student Kirk Kristofferson, who co-authored the forthcoming Journal of Consumer Research article.

Carnegie Mellon researchers use inkblots to improve security of online passwords

November 7, 2013 1:50 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Carnegie Mellon University computer scientists have developed a new password system that incorporates inkblots to provide an extra measure of protection when, as so often occurs, lists of passwords get stolen from websites. This new type of password, dubbed a GOTCHA, would be suitable for protecting high-value accounts...

Georgia Tech warns of threats to cloud data storage, mobile devices in latest 'emerging cyber threat'

November 7, 2013 1:40 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

As more businesses find their way into the cloud, few engage in security measures beyond those provided by the associated cloud storage firm, a new report from Georgia Tech notes. Even fewer seek heightened data protection because of concerns that usability and access to remote data would be significantly reduced.

1200 watt power supply achieves 94% platinum efficiency

November 6, 2013 4:14 pm | Murata Power Solutions Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Murata announced today the D1U54P series of 54mm wide 1200 Watt front-end power supplies from Murata Power Solutions. With industry leading efficiency of greater than 94% and a power density in excess of 28 Watts per cubic inch, these low-profile units measure only 54.5 x 321.5 x 40 mm and fit the industry standard 1U package format.

Samsung aims to topple Apple as No. 1 in tablets

November 6, 2013 2:15 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Samsung Electronics Co. has a new goal after overtaking Apple in smartphones: it wants to be world No. 1 in tablet computers. A top executive, Shin Jong-kyun, told analysts on Wednesday that Samsung's tablet business is growing rapidly and the company will become the biggest maker of tablet...

Optical backplane interconnect system supports VITA 66.1 standard

November 5, 2013 3:19 pm | Product Releases | Comments

TE Connectivity announces the new VITA 66.1 Ruggedized Optical Backplane interconnect system that has been designed to meet the needs of high-bandwidth applications such as for high-definition video and images and more specifically for computing applications requiring optical infrastructure.

Audio speaker driver IC brings 3X power output to Ultrabooks

November 5, 2013 12:05 pm | Dialog Semiconductor (Dialog North America) | Product Releases | Comments

Dialog Semiconductor announced today the first product in its new range of Class D audio products, the DA7202. This powerful, highly efficient low EMI Class D speaker driver provides greater power output and improved efficiency levels for Ultrabooks, tablets and speaker accessories powered by a dual cell battery pack.

Researcher finds way to reduce unnecessary lab tests, decrease patient costs by modifying software design

November 5, 2013 11:09 am | by University of Missouri-Columbia | News | Comments

When patients undergo diagnostic lab tests as part of the inpatient admission process, they may wonder why or how physicians choose particular tests. Increasingly, medical professionals are using electronic medical systems that provide lists of lab tests from which medical professionals can choose.

A better way to track your every move

November 5, 2013 10:59 am | by Northwestern University | News | Comments

Physical activity tracking apps on smart phones are a potentially important tool for doctors who want to collect data and create treatment or intervention plans to improve the health of patients who struggle with activity and movement -- such as those with Parkinson’s disease. A new Northwestern Medicine study has found a way to make these apps more accurate...

New computing model could lead to quicker advancements in medical research

November 5, 2013 10:50 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

With the promise of personalized and customized medicine, one extremely important tool for its success is the knowledge of a person's unique genetic profile. This personalized knowledge of one's genetic profile has been facilitated by the advent of next-generation sequencing (NGS), where sequencing a genome, like the human genome, has gone from costing $95,000,000 to a mere $5,700.

What is Google building out in San Francisco Bay?

November 5, 2013 10:43 am | by MARTHA MENDOZA, AP National Writer | News | Comments

San Francisco's mayor says he doesn't know what it is. Police say it's not their jurisdiction. And government inspectors are sworn to secrecy. Google is erecting a four-story structure in the heart of the San Francisco Bay but is managing to conceal its purpose by constructing it on docked barges instead of on land, where city building permits and public plans are mandatory.

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