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Argonne scientists pioneer strategy for creating new materials

September 2, 2014 12:46 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Making something new is never easy. Scientists constantly theorize about new materials, but when the material is manufactured it doesn't always work as expected. To create a new strategy for designing materials, scientists at the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory combined two different approaches at two different facilities to synthesize new materials....

Scientists get set for simulated nuclear inspection

September 2, 2014 12:37 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Some 40 scientists and technicians from around the world will descend on Jordan in November to take part in a simulated on-site inspection of a suspected nuclear test site on the banks of the Dead Sea. Playing the part of inspectors, the experts will have access to a wide range of sensor technologies to look for signs of whether a nuclear explosion has taken place....

A new synthetic amino acid for an emerging class of drugs

September 2, 2014 12:35 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

One of the greatest challenges in modern medicine is developing drugs that are highly effective against a target, but with minimal toxicity and side-effects to the patient. Such properties are directly related to the 3D structure of the drug molecule. Ideally, the drug should have a shape that is perfectly complementary to a disease-causing target, so that it binds it with high specificity....

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Why sibling stars look alike: Early, fast mixing in star-birth clouds

September 2, 2014 12:30 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Stars are made mostly of hydrogen and helium, but they also contain trace amounts of other elements, such as carbon, oxygen, iron, and even more exotic substances. By carefully measuring the wavelengths (colors) of light coming from a star, astronomers can determine how abundant each of these trace elements is....

Accounting for biological aggregation in heating and imaging of magnetic nanoparticles

September 2, 2014 12:09 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Biological aggregation is a critical, yet often overlooked factor in the medical application of nanoparticles. Here we systematically characterize the effects of aggregation on both radiofrequency heating and magnetic resonance image (MRI) contrast of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs), including detailed analysis of the aggregate morphologies based on quasi-fractal descriptions....

Nature's tiny engineers

September 2, 2014 11:57 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Conventional wisdom has long held that corals — whose calcium-carbonate skeletons form the foundation of coral reefs — are passive organisms that rely entirely on ocean currents to deliver dissolved substances, such as nutrients and oxygen. But now scientists at MIT ...

Family dinners reduce effects of cyberbullying in adolescents

September 2, 2014 11:54 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Sharing regular family meals with children may help protect them from the effects of cyberbullying, according to a study by McGill professor Frank Elgar, Institute for Health and Social Policy. Because family meal times represent social support and exchanges in the home....

Ride-sharing could cut cabs' road time by 30 percent

September 2, 2014 11:47 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Cellphone apps that find users car rides in real time are exploding in popularity: The car-service company Uber was recently valued at $18 billion, and even as it faces legal wrangles, a number of companies that provide similar services with licensed taxi cabs have sprung up....

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Single laser stops molecular tumbling motion instantly

September 2, 2014 11:45 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

In the quantum world, making the simple atom behave is one thing, but making the more complex molecule behave is another story. Now Northwestern University scientists have figured out an elegant way to stop a molecule from tumbling so that its potential ...

Researchers awarded $1.5 million to develop software to process solar astronomy data on larger scale

September 2, 2014 11:43 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Researchers in Georgia State University's new Astroinformatics program have been awarded $1.5 million from the National Science Foundation to develop software tools that can process large sets of solar astronomy data and allow scientists to perform analyses on scales and detail levels that have not been possible....

Nano-forests to reveal secrets of cells

September 2, 2014 11:40 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Vertical nanowires could be used for detailed studies of what happens on the surface of cells. The findings are important for pharmaceuticals research, among other applications. A group of researchers from Lund University in Sweden have managed to make artificial cell membranes form....

Preventing emergencies with home automation

August 28, 2014 2:09 pm | by Christian DeFeo, eSupplier and Innovation Manager, element14 | Blogs | Comments

The engineers in the Forget Me Not Challenge are hard at work on their designs as we approach the one-month mark, and Embedit Electronics and Cypress Semiconductor recently provided them with the new RPiSoC development platform to help bring their imagined creations to life. One theme that has been consistent throughout the competition is the idea that home automation technology can prevent a household emergency.

NASA's TRMM Satellite sees powerful towering storms in Cristobal

August 28, 2014 9:18 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

NASA's TRMM satellite identified areas of heavy rainfall occurring in Hurricane Cristobal as it continued strengthening on approach to Bermuda. NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM satellite flew above Hurricane Cristobal on August 26 at 11:35 UTC (7:35 a.m. EDT) gathering rainfall data....

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Experiments explain why some liquids are 'fragile' and others are 'strong'

August 28, 2014 9:13 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Only recently has it become possible to accurately "see" the structure of a liquid. Using X-rays and a high-tech apparatus that holds liquids without a container, Kenneth Kelton, PhD, the Arthur Holly Compton Professor in Arts & Sciences at Washington University in St. Louis, was able to compare the behavior of glass-forming liquids as they approach the glass transition....

Novel 'butterfly' molecule could build new sensors, photoenergy conversion devices

August 28, 2014 9:09 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Exciting new work by a Florida State University research team has led to a novel molecular system that can take your temperature, emit white light, and convert photon energy directly to mechanical motions. And, the molecule looks like a butterfly....

Commoditizing the network part two: Integrating service capabilities in white box switches

August 28, 2014 9:01 am | by Sam Fuller, Freescale Semiconductor | Blogs | Comments

Software defined networking and many of the accompanying trends have revolutionized the network. In Part 1 of this series, we discussed how white box switches are driving the network to increased commoditization. The flexibility and programmability provided by white box switches ...

NASA begins hurricane mission with Global Hawk flight to Cristobal

August 28, 2014 8:57 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The first of two unmanned Global Hawk aircraft landed at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Wallops Island, Virginia, on Aug. 27 after surveying Hurricane Cristobal for the first science flight of NASA's latest hurricane airborne mission. NASA's airborne Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel, or HS3, mission returns to NASA Wallops for the third year to investigate the processes that underlie hurricane formation and intensity change....

Kessler Foundation scientists study impact of cultural diversity in brain injury research

August 27, 2014 4:12 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Kessler Foundation scientists examined the implications for cultural diversity and cultural competence in brain injury research and rehabilitation. The article by Anthony Lequerica, PhD, and Denise Krch, PhD: Issues of cultural diversity in acquired brain injury (ABI) rehabilitation (doi:10.3233/NRE-141079) was published by Neurorehabilitation....

Scripps Research Institute scientists link alcohol-dependence gene to neurotransmitter

August 27, 2014 4:07 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have solved the mystery of why a specific signaling pathway can be associated with alcohol dependence. This signaling pathway is regulated by a gene, called neurofibromatosis type 1 (Nf1), which TSRI scientists found is linked with excessive drinking in mice....

Rubber meets the road with new ORNL carbon, battery technologies

August 27, 2014 4:03 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Recycled tires could see new life in lithium-ion batteries that provide power to plug-in electric vehicles and store energy produced by wind and solar, say researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory. By modifying the microstructural characteristics of carbon black ...

Kessler Foundation researchers publish first study of brain activation in MS using fNIRS

August 27, 2014 3:58 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Using functional near infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS), Kessler Foundation researchers have shown differential brain activation patterns between people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and healthy controls. This is the first MS study in which brain activation was studied using fNIRS while participants performed a cognitive task....

Water 'thermostat' could help engineer drought-resistant crops

August 27, 2014 3:51 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Duke University researchers have identified a gene that could help scientists engineer drought-resistant crops. The gene, called OSCA1, encodes a protein in the cell membrane of plants that senses changes in water availability and adjusts the plant's water conservation machinery accordingly....

University of Utah biologist wins Turkey's top science prize

August 27, 2014 2:37 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

University of Utah biologist Çagan Sekercioglu, who campaigns to save wetlands in his native Turkey, has won that nation's highest science prize, which is similar to the U.S. National Medal of Science. Sekercioglu is among five researchers picked for 2014 the top awards by TUBITAK, the Scientific and Technical Research Council of Turkey....

Detecting neutrinos, physicists look into the heart of the sun

August 27, 2014 2:31 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Using one of the most sensitive neutrino detectors on the planet, an international team of physicists including Andrea Pocar, Laura Cadonati and doctoral student Keith Otis at the University of Massachusetts Amherst report in the current issue of Nature that for the first time they have directly detected neutrinos created by the "keystone" proton-proton (pp) fusion process going on at the sun's core....

Scientist uncovers red planet's climate history in unique meteorite

August 27, 2014 2:21 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Was Mars — now a cold, dry place — once a warm, wet planet that sustained life? And if so, how long has it been cold and dry? Research underway at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory may one day answer those questions — and perhaps even help pave the way for future colonization of the Red Planet....

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