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Tracing water channels in cell surface receptors

September 9, 2014 9:04 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the largest class of cell surface receptors in our cells, involved in signal transmission across the cell membrane. One of the biggest questions is how a signal recognized at the extracellular side of a GPCR induces a....

Could the new iPhone kill credit cards for good?

September 8, 2014 8:10 am | by A.J. Watts, Editorial Intern | Blogs | Comments

Experts are predicting that the highly anticipated iPhone 6 will include an internal NFC chip that will make the device scannable at checkout counters everywhere. The idea of no longer fishing through your wallet or sorting through ...  

Kent State researchers to develop mobile app for Cuyahoga Valley National Park

September 5, 2014 12:47 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A $952,000 National Science Foundation grant to researchers at Kent State University will result in a mobile device application to help visitors to Cuyahoga Valley National Park learn more about the park's history and ecology and become "citizen scientists" by sharing their findings with others....

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ESF symposium focuses on 'New American Environmentalism'

September 5, 2014 12:42 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A group of leading environmental scientists and policy experts will gather Sept. 11 at the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) to discuss a New American Environmentalism.Participating in a symposium held in connection with the inauguration of ESF's new president, the panelists will represent ESF and several other institutions: Syracuse University, the Mohawk Council of the Akwesasne, the U.S. Green Building Council....

Brain mechanism underlying the recognition of hand gestures develops even when blind

September 5, 2014 12:39 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Does a distinctive mechanism work in the brain of congenitally blind individuals when understanding and learning others' gestures? Or does the same mechanism as with sighted individuals work? Japanese researchers figured out that activated brain regions of congenitally blind individuals ...

Peptoid nanosheets at the oil-water interface

September 5, 2014 10:46 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

From the people who brought us peptoid nanosheets that form at the interface between air and water, now come peptoid nanosheets that form at the interface between oil and water. Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have developed peptoid nanosheets - two-dimensional biomimetic materials with customizable properties....

The future of ultrascale computing under study

September 5, 2014 10:37 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Ultrascale systems combine the advantages of distributed and parallel computing systems. The former is a type of computing in which many tasks are executed at the same time coordinately to solve one problem, based on the principle that a big problem can be divided into many smaller ones that are simultaneously solved....

Harvard & Cornell researchers develop untethered, autonomous soft robot

September 5, 2014 10:33 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Imagine a non-rigid, shape-changing robot that walks on four "legs," can operate without the constraints of a tether, and can function in a snowstorm, move through puddles of water, and even withstand limited exposure to flames. Harvard advanced materials chemist George Whitesides, PhD and colleagues describe the mobile, autonomous robot they have created in Soft Robotics....

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Atomically thin material opens door for integrated nanophotonic circuits

September 5, 2014 10:29 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A new combination of materials can efficiently guide electricity and light along the same tiny wire, a finding that could be a step towards building computer chips capable of transporting digital information at the speed of light. Reporting today in The Optical Society's (OSA) high-impact journal Optica, optical and material scientists at the University of Rochester and Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich....

A metallic alloy that is tough and ductile at cryogenic temperatures

September 5, 2014 9:26 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A new concept in metallic alloy design – called "high-entropy alloys" - has yielded a multiple-element material that not only tests out as one of the toughest on record, but, unlike most materials, the toughness as well as the strength and ductility of this alloy actually improves at cryogenic temperatures....

UCSB researchers develop ultra sensitive biosensor from molybdenite semiconductor

September 5, 2014 9:10 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Move over, graphene. An atomically thin, two-dimensional, ultrasensitive semiconductor material for biosensing developed by researchers at UC Santa Barbara promises to push the boundaries of biosensing technology in many fields, from health care to environmental protection to forensic industries....

2-D or 3-D? That is the question

September 5, 2014 9:06 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The increased visual realism of 3-D films is believed to offer viewers a more vivid and lifelike experience—more thrilling and intense than 2-D because it more closely approximates real life. However, psychology researchers at the University of Utah, among those who use film clips routinely in the lab to study patients' emotional conditions, have found that there is no significant difference between the two formats....

Rosetta-Alice spectrograph obtains first far ultraviolet spectra of a cometary surface

September 5, 2014 8:56 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

NASA's Alice ultraviolet (UV) spectrograph aboard the European Space Agency's Rosetta comet orbiter has delivered its first scientific discoveries. Rosetta, in orbit around comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, is the first spacecraft to study a comet up close....

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Hurricane Norbert pinwheels in NASA satellite imagery

September 5, 2014 8:53 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The Eastern Pacific's Hurricane Norbert resembled a pinwheel in an image from NASA's Terra satellite as bands of thunderstorms spiraled into the center. NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission has helped forecasters see that Norbert has lost some of its organization early on September 4....

News media losing role as gatekeepers to new 'social mediators' on Twitter, study finds

September 5, 2014 8:45 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The U.S. government is doing a better job of communicating on Twitter with people in sensitive areas like the Middle East and North Africa without the participation of media organizations, according to a study co-authored by a University of Georgia researcher....

Magnetic nanocubes self-assemble into helical superstructures

September 5, 2014 8:41 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Materials made from nanoparticles hold promise for myriad applications, from improved solar energy production to perfect touch screens. The challenge in creating these wonder-materials is organizing the nanoparticles into orderly arrangements....

4th generation Intel processor provides exceptional computing in new Aitech rugged 6U VME SBC

September 3, 2014 2:14 pm | Aitech | Product Releases | Comments

Aitech Defense Systems (Chatsworth, CA) now offers the C163, a rugged 6U VME SBC based on the 4th generation Intel Core i7 (Haswell) processor family. Based on the latest Intel, 4th generation Core i5 or Core i7 Haswell multicore processors ...

Antarctic sea-level rising faster than global rate

September 3, 2014 1:18 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A new study of satellite data from the last 19 years reveals that fresh water from melting glaciers has caused the sea-level around the coast of Antarctica to rise by 2cm more than the global average of 6cm. Researchers at the University of Southampton detected the rapid rise in sea-level....

Infographic: Where are all the women in STEM?

September 3, 2014 8:00 am | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor and Eileen Whitmore, Art Director | Blogs | Comments

When it comes to women in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathethmatics) the numbers just don’t add up. Even though the number of women majoring in STEM (and attending college) has increased in the past few decades, the number of women who actually enter the fields has barely increased at all....

Observing the onset of a magnetic substorm

September 2, 2014 12:55 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Magnetic substorms, the disruptions in geomagnetic activity that cause brightening of aurora, may sometimes be driven by a different process than generally thought, a new study in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics shows....

Reducing water scarcity possible by 2050

September 2, 2014 12:51 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Water scarcity is not a problem just for the developing world. In California, legislators are currently proposing a $7.5 billion emergency water plan to their voters; and U.S. federal officials last year warned residents of Arizona and Nevada that they could face cuts in Colorado River water deliveries in 2016....

Argonne scientists pioneer strategy for creating new materials

September 2, 2014 12:46 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Making something new is never easy. Scientists constantly theorize about new materials, but when the material is manufactured it doesn't always work as expected. To create a new strategy for designing materials, scientists at the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory combined two different approaches at two different facilities to synthesize new materials....

Scientists get set for simulated nuclear inspection

September 2, 2014 12:37 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Some 40 scientists and technicians from around the world will descend on Jordan in November to take part in a simulated on-site inspection of a suspected nuclear test site on the banks of the Dead Sea. Playing the part of inspectors, the experts will have access to a wide range of sensor technologies to look for signs of whether a nuclear explosion has taken place....

A new synthetic amino acid for an emerging class of drugs

September 2, 2014 12:35 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

One of the greatest challenges in modern medicine is developing drugs that are highly effective against a target, but with minimal toxicity and side-effects to the patient. Such properties are directly related to the 3D structure of the drug molecule. Ideally, the drug should have a shape that is perfectly complementary to a disease-causing target, so that it binds it with high specificity....

Why sibling stars look alike: Early, fast mixing in star-birth clouds

September 2, 2014 12:30 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Stars are made mostly of hydrogen and helium, but they also contain trace amounts of other elements, such as carbon, oxygen, iron, and even more exotic substances. By carefully measuring the wavelengths (colors) of light coming from a star, astronomers can determine how abundant each of these trace elements is....

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