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DTU researchers film protein quake for the first time

August 27, 2014 10:21 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

One of nature's mysteries is how plants survive impact by the huge amounts of energy contained in the sun's rays, while using this energy for photosynthesis. The hypothesis is that the light-absorbing proteins in the plant's blades quickly dissipate the energy throughout the entire protein molecule through so-called protein quakes....

The thunder god vine, assisted by nanotechnology, could shake up future cancer treatment

August 27, 2014 10:18 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second leading cause of cancer-associated death worldwide. These regrettably poor prognoses are due to the difficulty in treating this cancer using conventional chemotherapeutic drugs such as doxorubicin, epirubicin, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil, etoposide or combinations therein....

Researchers find boron facilitates stem cell growth and development in corn

August 27, 2014 10:15 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Boron deficiency is one of the most widespread causes of reduced crop yield. Missouri and the eastern half of the United States are plagued by boron deficient soil and, often, corn and soybean farmers are required to supplement their soil with boron; however, little is known about the ways in which corn plants utilize the essential nutrient....

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Wireless charging and NFC reference design is automotive ready

August 27, 2014 10:12 am | Melexis, Freescale Semiconductor | Product Releases | Comments

Combining the automotive grade NFC (Near Field Communication) transceiver of Melexis with Freescale Semiconductor’s wireless charging technology enables a ready to use reference design solution that is positioned to free drivers from the dreaded low battery warning.

Coal's continued dominance must be made more vivid in climate change accounting

August 27, 2014 10:11 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The world's accounting system for carbon emissions, run by the United Nations, disregards capital investments in future coal-fired and natural-gas power plants that will commit the world to several decades and billions of tons of greenhouse gas emissions, according to a new study from Princeton University and the University of California-Irvine published Aug. 26 in the journal Environmental Research Letters....

Are consumers more likely to purchase unintentionally green products?

August 27, 2014 9:56 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A Fortune 500 company is redesigning a popular product using materials that are friendlier to the environment. How will consumers respond to the newly redesigned, "greener" product? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are more likely to purchase a product if they think helping the environment is not the intended purpose of a product improvement....

Museum specimens, modern cities show how an insect pest will respond to climate change

August 27, 2014 9:49 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University have found that century-old museum specimens hold clues to how global climate change will affect a common insect pest that can weaken and kill trees – and the news is not good. "Recent studies found that scale insect populations increase on oak and maple trees in warmer urban areas, which raises the possibility that these pests may also increase with global warming,"....

3D TSV Technology-based DDR4 modules support enterprise servers

August 27, 2014 9:47 am | Samsung | Product Releases | Comments

Samsung Electronics, Ltd. (Seoul, Korea) has started mass producing what are believed to be the industry’s first 64 gigabyte (GB), double data rate-4 (DDR4), registered dual Inline memory modules (RDIMMs) that use …

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Symphony of nanoplasmonic and optical resonators produces laser-like light emission

August 27, 2014 9:42 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

By combining plasmonics and optical microresonators, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have created a new optical amplifier (or laser) design, paving the way for power-on-a-chip applications. "We have made optical systems at the microscopic scale that amplify light and produce ultra-narrowband spectral output," explained J. Gary Eden, a professor of electrical and computer engineering (ECE) at Illinois....

Competition for graphene

August 27, 2014 9:38 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A new argument has just been added to the growing case for graphene being bumped off its pedestal as the next big thing in the high-tech world by the two-dimensional semiconductors known as MX2 materials. An international collaboration of researchers led by a scientist with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab)....

Sleep apnea treatment is effective for older people

August 27, 2014 9:33 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Continuous positive airway pressure is effective at treating sleep apnoea in older people, a new study has found. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a condition where the walls of the throat relax and narrow during sleep, interrupting normal breathing and causing profound sleepiness....

Yale journal explores advances in sustainable manufacturing

August 27, 2014 9:29 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

In recent years, increasing pressure from policymakers, consumers, and suppliers has prompted manufacturers to set environmental targets that go beyond reducing the pollutants they emit from their smokestacks or discharge into rivers and lakes....

Satellite shows Hurricane Marie about to swallow Karina

August 27, 2014 9:24 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Massive Hurricane Marie appears like a giant fish about to swallow tiny Tropical Depression Karina on satellite imagery today from NOAA's GOES-West satellite. Karina, now a tropical depression is being swept into Marie's circulation where it is expected to be eaten, or absorbed....

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Best view yet of merging galaxies in distant universe

August 27, 2014 9:20 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The famous fictional detective Sherlock Holmes used a magnifying lens to reveal barely visible but important evidence. Astronomers are now combining the power of many telescopes on Earth and in space [1] with a vastly larger form of lens to study a case of vigorous star formation in the early Universe....

Collaboration aims to reduce, treat vision problems in astronauts

August 27, 2014 9:17 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

To reduce and better treat spaceflight-induced visual impairment, University of Houston (UH) optometrists are collaborating on a NASA study that examines ocular changes seen in a number of astronauts. The research, developed by Heidelberg Engineering, uses Spectralis® Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), which is a technique for obtaining subsurface images of translucent or opaque materials....

What lit up the universe?

August 27, 2014 9:12 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

New research from UCL shows we will soon uncover the origin of the ultraviolet light that bathes the cosmos, helping scientists understand how galaxies were built. The study published today in The Astrophysical Journal Letters by UCL cosmologists Dr Andrew Pontzen and Dr Hiranya Peiris (both UCL Physics & Astronomy), together with collaborators at Princeton and Barcelona Universities....

Introducing the multi-tasking nanoparticle

August 27, 2014 9:08 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Kit Lam and colleagues from UC Davis and other institutions have created dynamic nanoparticles (NPs) that could provide an arsenal of applications to diagnose and treat cancer. Built on an easy-to-make polymer, these particles can be used as contrast agents to light up tumors for MRI and PET scans or deliver chemo and other therapies to destroy tumors....

New technology may identify tiny strains in body tissues before injuries occur

August 27, 2014 9:05 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have developed algorithms to identify weak spots in tendons, muscles and bones prone to tearing or breaking. The technology, which needs to be refined before it is used in patients, one day may help pinpoint minor strains and tiny injuries in the body's tissues long before bigger problems occur....

Breakthrough antibacterial approach could resolve serious skin infections

August 27, 2014 9:00 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Like a protective tent over a colony of harmful bacteria, biofilms make the treatment of skin infections especially difficult. Microorganisms protected in a biofilm pose a significant health risk due to their antibiotic resistance and recalcitrance to treatment, and biofilm-protected bacteria account for some 80 percent of total bacterial infections in humans....

Scientists craft atomically seamless, thinnest-possible semiconductor junctions

August 27, 2014 8:56 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Scientists have developed what they believe is the thinnest-possible semiconductor, a new class of nanoscale materials made in sheets only three atoms thick. The University of Washington researchers have demonstrated that two of these single-layer semiconductor materials can be connected in an atomically seamless fashion known as a heterojunction....

NSF expands the National Innovation Network with 2 new I-Corps nodes

August 27, 2014 8:49 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded two major grants to further expand and support a national network of public-private partnerships to transition fundamental science and engineering discoveries to the marketplace under the Innovation Corps (I-Corps™) program....

This is what it's like to be in the cockpit of an F-16

August 27, 2014 8:29 am | by Kasey Panetta, Managing Editor | Blogs | Comments

The title says it all here, but this is ridiculous. The video was taken from the cockpit of a Royal Danish Air Force F-16 as it was flying, quite low, over an ice sheet in Greenland.  There isn't too much information available, but after take off (hold on to your stomach) you'll first see the ice rim (located east of Kangerlussuaq, Greenland)....

Commoditizing the network: The white box switch

August 27, 2014 8:06 am | by Sam Fuller, Freescale Semiconductor | Freescale Semiconductor | Blogs | Comments

By now, it should come as no surprise that networking is changing. The number of devices – not just PCs – connected to the Internet has exploded. According to the recently released Cisco Visual Networking Index, by 2018 devices will generate more network traffic than PCs....

LG bets on pricey OLED technology as future of TVs

August 26, 2014 4:38 pm | by YOUKYUNG LEE, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

LG Electronics Inc. announced two new giant OLED TVs with ultra-high definition screens Monday, sticking with its strategy of using the exceptionally expensive OLED display technology. The South Korean company said it will ship 65-inch OLED TVs...

A Closer Look: Reading tablets decent, but needed?

August 26, 2014 4:30 pm | by ANICK JESDANUN, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

E-book readers are great for reading books, but they can't be used get directions or watch videos of people dumping ice over their heads. Tablets can. In partnership with Samsung, Barnes & Noble released a reading-centric tablet last week....

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