Advertisement
News
Subscribe to ECN Magazine News
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

ECN Daily

Labs characterize carbon for batteries

July 15, 2014 9:33 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Lithium-ion batteries could benefit from a theoretical model created at Rice University and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that predicts how carbon components will perform. The model is based on intrinsic characteristics of materials used as battery electrodes....

TOPICS:

New research suggests soluble corn fibre may boost calcium absorption

July 15, 2014 9:29 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Around the globe, fibre and calcium intakes are below the levels recommended by experts1,2,3 contributing to potential long-term public health implications1,3,4. New research, published this month in the British Journal of Nutrition, shows soluble corn fibre (SCF) may not simply boost fibre intake when added to foods....

Running for life: How speed restricts evolutionary change of the vertebral column

July 15, 2014 9:26 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

One of the riddles of mammal evolution explained: the strong conservation of the number of trunk vertebrae. Researchers of the Naturalis Biodiversity Center and the University of Utah show that this conservation is probably due to the essential role of speed and agility in survival of fast running mammals....

Advertisement

Smallest Swiss cross -- Made of 20 single atoms

July 15, 2014 9:21 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

The manipulation of atoms has reached a new level: Together with teams from Finland and Japan, physicists from the University of Basel were able to place 20 single atoms on a fully insulated surface at room temperature to form the smallest "Swiss cross", thus taking a big step towards next generation atomic-scale storage devices....

Study: Friends share similarities in their DNA

July 15, 2014 9:16 am | by MALCOLM RITTER, AP Science Writer | Comments

You may be more similar to your friends than you think: A study suggests that the DNA code tends to be more alike between friends than between strangers. That's beyond the effect of shared ethnicity, researchers say. And it could be important for theories about human evolution, says James Fowler of the University of California, San Diego....

Introducing Thread: A new wireless networking protocol for the home

July 15, 2014 9:12 am | by ECN Staff | Comments

Recognizing the need for a new and better way to connect products in the home, seven companies today announced that they’ve joined forces to form the Thread Group (www.threadgroup.org) and develop Thread, a new IP-based wireless networking protocol. The charter of the Thread Group is to guide the adoption of the Thread protocol....

TOPICS:

On Welsh Corgis, computer vision, and the power of deep learning

July 15, 2014 8:15 am | by ECN Staff | Comments

Project Adam from Microsoft Research uses a new, distributed-systems architecture and techniques to scale deep neural networks, in speed and accuracy, to perform computer-vision recognition and categorization tasks at world-record levels of performance....

Photos of the Day: LG’s 18-inch flexible display

July 14, 2014 1:28 pm | by Youkyung Lee - AP Technology Writer - Associated Press | Comments

LG Display Co. has developed an 18-inch flexible display that can be rolled into the shape of a thin cylinder, a step toward making a large display for flexible TVs. The South Korean display panel maker said Friday the flexible display has a resolution of 1200 pixels by 810 pixels and maintains its function when it is rolled up....

TOPICS:
Advertisement

Flashes of light on the superconductor

July 14, 2014 1:06 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Superconductors are futuristic materials that will hopefully have a broad range of technological applications at some time in the future (medical imaging, transport…). Today's use is limited by the extremely low temperatures (close to absolute zero) required for superconductivity to manifest....

Squishy robots

July 14, 2014 1:05 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

In the movie "Terminator 2," the shape-shifting T-1000 robot morphs into a liquid state to squeeze through tight spaces or to repair itself when harmed. Now a phase-changing material built from wax and foam, and capable of switching between hard and soft states, could allow even low-cost robots to perform the same feat....

University of Illinois researchers demonstrate novel, tunable nanoantennas

July 14, 2014 1:01 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

A research team from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has developed a novel, tunable nanoantenna that paves the way for new kinds of plasmonic-based optomechanical systems, whereby plasmonic field enhancement can actuate mechanical motion....

Better use of electronic health records makes clinical trials less expensive

July 14, 2014 12:57 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Using electronic health records to understand the best available treatment for patients, from a range of possible options, is more efficient and less costly for taxpayers than the existing clinical trial process, a new study shows. Research led by Professor van Staa, carried out while he was a member of the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) ...

TOPICS:

Getting a charge out of water droplets

July 14, 2014 12:53 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Last year, MIT researchers discovered that when water droplets spontaneously jump away from superhydrophobic surfaces during condensation, they can gain electric charge in the process. Now, the same team has demonstrated that this process can generate small amounts of electricity that might be used to power electronic devices....

Advertisement

New professorship in tissue engineering links molecular engineering, marine biology

July 14, 2014 12:49 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

The University of Chicago is creating a new professorship in tissue engineering to promote innovative work at the University's Institute for Molecular Engineering and the Marine Biological Laboratory, supported by a $3.5 million donation from the Millicent and Eugene Bell Foundation....

Drone lighting

July 14, 2014 12:45 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Lighting is crucial to the art of photography. But lights are cumbersome and time-consuming to set up, and outside the studio, it can be prohibitively difficult to position them where, ideally, they ought to go. Researchers at MIT and Cornell University hope to change that by providing photographers with squadrons of small, light-equipped autonomous robots....

TOPICS:

Pages

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading