Advertisement
News
Subscribe to ECN Magazine News
View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

ECN Daily

A less resource-intensive way to make ethanol

April 10, 2014 8:12 am | by MIT Technology Review | Comments

Stanford researchers develop a copper catalyst that can efficiently convert carbon monoxide and water to ethanol.Today, nearly all ethanol fuel is made from corn or sugarcane, which requires vast tracts of land and huge quantities of water and fertilizer. Researchers at Stanford University have now...

Men vs. women: Seated at the tech table

April 10, 2014 8:10 am | by AllVoices | Comments

Remember Larry Summers, the one-time aspirant for the Fed's top job, former Treasury secretary, ex- president of Harvard, and generally opinionated busybody, and his remarks on women and science? Folks like him have got their ultimate comeuppance with recent news...

Domain walls in nanowires cleverly set in motion

April 10, 2014 7:05 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Researchers at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have achieved a major breakthrough in the development of methods of information processing in nanomagnets. Using a new trick, they have been able to induce synchronous motion of the domain walls in a ferromagnetic nanowire....

Advertisement

Into the abyss: Scientists explore one of Earth's deepest ocean trenches

April 10, 2014 6:13 am | by National Science Foundation | Comments

What lives in the deepest part of the ocean--the abyss?A team of researchers funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) will use the world's only full-ocean-depth, hybrid, remotely-operated vehicle, Nereus, and other advanced technology to find out. They will explore the Kermadec Trench at the...

Expanding particles to engineer defects

April 9, 2014 2:02 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Materials scientists have long known that introducing defects into three-dimensional materials can improve their mechanical and electronic properties. Now a new Northwestern study finds how defects affect two-dimensional crystalline structures, and the results hold information for designing new materials....

A faster Internet for your smartphones

April 9, 2014 1:59 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Most of us spend a significant portion of our time on our phones. So when the Internet connection slows or stalls, it can interrupt our lives to a maddening degree. We complain about the network, shut down apps, and double-check our bars to troubleshoot the problem....

Future computers that are 'normally off'

April 9, 2014 1:57 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

If a research team in Japan gets its wish, "normally off" computers may one day soon be replacing present computers in a move that would both eliminate volatile memory, which requires power to maintain stored data, and reduce the gigantic energy losses associated with it....

Is the power grid too big?

April 9, 2014 1:54 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Some 90 years ago, British polymath J.B.S. Haldane proposed that for every animal there is an optimal size -- one which allows it to make best use of its environment and the physical laws that govern its activities, whether hiding, hunting, hoofing or hibernating....

Advertisement

Scalable CVD process for making 2-D molybdenum diselenide

April 9, 2014 1:51 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Nanoengineering researchers at Rice University and Nanyang Technological University in Singapore have unveiled a potentially scalable method for making one-atom-thick layers of molybdenum diselenide -- a highly sought semiconductor that is similar to graphene....

Advanced warning systems increase safety at intersections, study shows

April 9, 2014 1:47 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Most drivers have experienced a traffic signal that turns yellow just as they approach an intersection, which makes it difficult for them to decide whether to stop or proceed through it. The wrong choice in this situation, known as the "dilemma zone," may lead to crashes....

A new twist makes for better steel, researchers find

April 9, 2014 1:42 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Researchers from Brown University and universities in China have found a simple technique that can strengthen steel without sacrificing ductility. The new technique, described in Nature Communications, could produce steel that performs better in a number of structural applications....

Searching high and low for dark matter

April 9, 2014 1:40 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Recently, dark matter hunters from around the world gathered at the University of California, Los Angeles for "Dark Matter 2014." The annual conference is one of the largest of its kind aimed at discussing the latest progress in the quest to identify dark matter....

Memory accuracy and strength can be manipulated during sleep

April 9, 2014 1:37 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

The sense of smell might seem intuitive, almost something you take for granted. But researchers from NYU Langone Medical Center have found that memory of specific odors depends on the ability of the brain to learn, process and recall accurately and effectively during slow-wave sleep....

Advertisement

Photos of the Day: 'RoboClam' digs with extreme efficiency

April 9, 2014 1:33 pm | by ECN Staff | Comments

  A group of researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have created a digging robot — dubbed the “RoboClam” — inspired by the Atlantic razor clam. The RoboClam digs so effectively by changing the surrounding soil into liquid....

TOPICS:

Webb telescope's heart complete, final instrument installed

April 9, 2014 9:18 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

The last piece of the James Webb Space Telescope's heart was installed inside the world's largest clean room at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. What looked like a massive black frame covered with wires and aluminum foil, the heart or Integrated Science Instrument Module...

TOPICS:

Pages

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading