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Research alliance for the digital revolution

July 15, 2014 4:21 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Partners from industry and science are joining forces in a novel collaborative research alliance to address the future-oriented fields of automation and digitalization. Siemens is the first company to forge a research alliance with universities and research institutes that will utilize a new, fully integrated approach....

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3-D nanostructure could benefit nanoelectronics, gas storage

July 15, 2014 4:18 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

A three-dimensional porous nanostructure would have a balance of strength, toughness and ability to transfer heat that could benefit nanoelectronics, gas storage and composite materials that perform multiple functions, according to engineers at Rice University....

Fundamental chemistry findings could help extend Moore's Law

July 15, 2014 4:16 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Over the years, computer chips have gotten smaller thanks to advances in materials science and manufacturing technologies. This march of progress, the doubling of transistors on a microprocessor roughly every two years, is called Moore's Law. But there's one component of the chip-making process in need of an overhaul if Moore's law is to continue....

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Drones: Next big thing in aviation is small

July 15, 2014 4:12 pm | by DANICA KIRKA, Associated Press | Comments

The next big thing in aviation may be really small. With some no bigger than a hummingbird, the hottest things at this week's Farnborough International Airshow are tiny compared with the titans of the sky, such as the Airbus 380 or the Boeing Dreamliner....

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Technology patented by Dr. Schneider will make highway barriers more safe

July 15, 2014 12:19 pm | by Texas A&M University | Comments

LifeNet Systems Inc. recently purchased license to a patent on a technology invented in NASA’s Johnson Space Center, by Dr. William Schneider , professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering, and Dr. James Locke in 2001. This technology will make highway safety barriers safer....

Photos of the Day: Homeland Security's robotic tuna

July 15, 2014 10:23 am | by U.S. Department of Homeland Security | Comments

Inspired by the real tuna, BIOSwimmer is a UUV designed for high maneuverability in harsh environments, with a flexible aft section and appropriately placed sets of pectoral and other fins. For those cluttered and hard-to-reach underwater places where inspection is necessary, the tuna-inspired frame is an optimal design....

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Older adults nearly twice as likely to have memories affected by distractions

July 15, 2014 9:37 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Older people are nearly twice as likely as their younger counterparts to have their memory and cognitive processes impaired by environmental distractions (such as irrelevant speech or written words presented along with target stimuli), according to a new study from psychologists at Rice University and Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine....

Labs characterize carbon for batteries

July 15, 2014 9:33 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Lithium-ion batteries could benefit from a theoretical model created at Rice University and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that predicts how carbon components will perform. The model is based on intrinsic characteristics of materials used as battery electrodes....

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New research suggests soluble corn fibre may boost calcium absorption

July 15, 2014 9:29 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Around the globe, fibre and calcium intakes are below the levels recommended by experts1,2,3 contributing to potential long-term public health implications1,3,4. New research, published this month in the British Journal of Nutrition, shows soluble corn fibre (SCF) may not simply boost fibre intake when added to foods....

Running for life: How speed restricts evolutionary change of the vertebral column

July 15, 2014 9:26 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

One of the riddles of mammal evolution explained: the strong conservation of the number of trunk vertebrae. Researchers of the Naturalis Biodiversity Center and the University of Utah show that this conservation is probably due to the essential role of speed and agility in survival of fast running mammals....

Smallest Swiss cross -- Made of 20 single atoms

July 15, 2014 9:21 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

The manipulation of atoms has reached a new level: Together with teams from Finland and Japan, physicists from the University of Basel were able to place 20 single atoms on a fully insulated surface at room temperature to form the smallest "Swiss cross", thus taking a big step towards next generation atomic-scale storage devices....

Study: Friends share similarities in their DNA

July 15, 2014 9:16 am | by MALCOLM RITTER, AP Science Writer | Comments

You may be more similar to your friends than you think: A study suggests that the DNA code tends to be more alike between friends than between strangers. That's beyond the effect of shared ethnicity, researchers say. And it could be important for theories about human evolution, says James Fowler of the University of California, San Diego....

Introducing Thread: A new wireless networking protocol for the home

July 15, 2014 9:12 am | by ECN Staff | Comments

Recognizing the need for a new and better way to connect products in the home, seven companies today announced that they’ve joined forces to form the Thread Group (www.threadgroup.org) and develop Thread, a new IP-based wireless networking protocol. The charter of the Thread Group is to guide the adoption of the Thread protocol....

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On Welsh Corgis, computer vision, and the power of deep learning

July 15, 2014 8:15 am | by ECN Staff | Comments

Project Adam from Microsoft Research uses a new, distributed-systems architecture and techniques to scale deep neural networks, in speed and accuracy, to perform computer-vision recognition and categorization tasks at world-record levels of performance....

Photos of the Day: LG’s 18-inch flexible display

July 14, 2014 1:28 pm | by Youkyung Lee - AP Technology Writer - Associated Press | Comments

LG Display Co. has developed an 18-inch flexible display that can be rolled into the shape of a thin cylinder, a step toward making a large display for flexible TVs. The South Korean display panel maker said Friday the flexible display has a resolution of 1200 pixels by 810 pixels and maintains its function when it is rolled up....

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