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ECIA Statement Regarding Radiation from the Recent Earthquake and Tsunami in Japan

Mon, 04/04/2011 - 6:37am
The Electronic Components Industry Association (ECIA) extends our heartfelt condolences to all those affected by the disaster in Japan. In an effort to update the industry on disruptions in the supply chain due to materials and production availability as well as infrastructure conditions, ECIA has compiled updates and status reports from electronic component manufacturers, which may be found at (www.eciaonline.org/japan.html)

In addition to parts availability, the current situation in Japan has prompted questions about part contamination, radiation measurements, and personnel safety. ECIA is monitoring developments in Japan and will provide updates as we receive information relative to component shipment radiation risks for electronic industry supply chain members. (www.eciaonline.org)

U. S. Customs and Border Protection continues to measure radiation levels of cargo coming from Japan. The agency reports that air and sea cargo is currently being monitored for evidence of radiation and that there is no current risk related to electronic component shipments from Japan. There has been no cargo that has received a positive alert for radiation deemed by CBP to be at harmful levels.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), a division of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), states that the agency is unaware of any contamination from cargo or packages entering the United States. (www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/radiation/workerinfo.html)

Other organizations including the World Health Organization and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration have agreed that there is little or no cause for concern about cargo or packages arriving from Japan.

ECIA encourages the industry and its customers to monitor the following agencies for the latest information.

· The US Customs and Border Patrol (CBP)

· The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

· The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

· The World Health Organization (WHO)

Based on the monitoring and testing being conducted by these various agencies, it is unlikely that the authorized components supply chain is contaminated. ECIA will supply industry updates as conditions change. (www.eciaonline.org)

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