Advertisement
News
Advertisement

Story tips from the US Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory April 2010

Tue, 03/30/2010 - 2:25pm
EurekAlert

NEUTRONS - A powerful pulse . . .

A new pulsed magnet technique developed for Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Spallation Neutron Source shatters previous field strength limits for pulsed neutron scattering experiments. Japan's Tohoku University worked with SNS researchers to develop the new technique, which uses a 30-Tesla pulsed magnet to subject a material sample to extremely high magnetic fields.

Neutron scattering analysis at these high and varied magnetic fields, combined with the intensity of the SNS's neutron beams, provides unprecedented opportunities to gather data on changes in magnetic phases and information on the underlying forces behind magnetism and its properties. Funding: Office of Science Basic Energy Sciences and Japan. [Contact: Bill Cabage, (865) 574-4399, cabagewh@ornl.gov]

BIOMEDICAL - Meeting of minds . . .

Science, medicine and engineering will come together in a neuro kind of way as about 150 professionals convene at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for its annual Biomedical Science and Engineering Conference May 25-26. This year¹s theme focuses on biomedical research and analysis in neuroscience. Among the areas to be discussed is measurement science, which involves imaging tools, detectors, image processing, integration, diagnostic and detection devices, and surgical and optical tools. Conference organizers say a key objective is to determine where there are knowledge gaps and then identify tools needed to detect and treat brain injuries and diseases. More information is available at https://www.ornl.gov/bsec_conferences/2010. [Contact: Ron Walli, (865) 576-0226; wallira@ornl.gov]

NUCLEAR - Power plant possibilities . . .

Up to four times as much land is available to site small nuclear power plants as compared to large plants, according to a study prepared by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Department of Energy. Researchers used geographic information system data combined with other tools to develop a new optimization technique. The goal is to help DOE find suitable sites to meet the need for 300 gigawatts of new electricity generation from nuclear power by 2050. The exhaustive optimization process takes into consideration population density, protected lands, terrain, proximity to water, airports, military bases, oil pipelines, refineries and a number of other factors. The same approach is also useful for siting other sources for electrical generation such as wind, solar, clean coal and hydro. [Contact: Ron Walli, (865) 576-0226; wallira@ornl.gov]

SOURCE

Topics

Advertisement

Share this Story

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading