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My Screaming Favorites from 2009

Tue, 12/22/2009 - 12:52pm
Screaming Circuits

Years ago, it seemed like the last two weeks in December were just full of retrospectives on the year. It was all over the media all the time. I don't really hear so much of that any more, which might be a good thing, because it kind of made me a little sick at times. Certainly many lists are around, but it just doesn't seem to be such a big deal. Or maybe, I just don't pay attention anymore.

I'm in just that kinds of a mood, so I thought I'd put out my own little retrospective. It's not really a top-ten list, but close enough.

Trade shows: Still got to be the Embedded Systems Conference. I love engineer shows. Years ago, I used to go the Comdex and CES. Way, way back, I went to the West Coast Computer Faire (I was there when the Mac was first shown). Comdex and CES all so glurgy and more about hype then real stuff. At ESC, most of the companies are there showing things that I like and most of the attendees are there to actually learn. It's just cool.

It was kind of sad to see such a sharp decline in companies participating both in San Jose and Boston this year. I think we saw about the same number of folks wandering the show floor as past years, so that at least was good, but I do hope this show remains strong.Ti_beagle_board_top2 (Small)

Embedded dev boards: This is a three-way tie between the Beagleboard, from Ti, the mbed, from NXP /  Arm and a PIC based board that I made myself. 

The Beagleboard really sets a new standard for power and accessibility in the embedded development world. As far as I can see, it's a game changer in those terms. Really fine work and making it affordable and open source has made it accessibly to a huge community that would likely have not jumped were it positioned as a high-cost closed development system.

Mbed-microcontroller-angledThe mbed does for ease of programming and learning what the Beagleboard does for power and features. mBed is truly amazing in terms of how easy it is to get up and running with a 32 bit processor. Again, I don't think I've seen this big of a leap in ease of development ever.

I could list the Arduino here, and it's a viable contender in the 8-bit class, but I'm876-CTRL_rev2.1 001 g more of a PIC guy and I'm a little biased toward mine because, well, it's mine. The Arduino gets enough attention in other places anyway. Mine is of a similar caste as Arduino, was first designed in 2005 and has gone through a number of iterations since. It has IMHO a better I/O structure and a little bus to easily connect to some small motor controllers I've designed.

New chip packaging: Package on Package (POP) has been around for a while, but I think it's just finally starting to come in to its own this year, and we've just started assembling it this year. It's a pretty cool way to chomp some more size out of a small little embedded design. The Ti OMAP (used in the Beagleboard) isn't the only POP that we've assembled here at Screaming Circuits, but it's probably the most visible example.

Consumerish thing: I'd have to say electronic ink, as used in the Kindle and other electronic book readers. I haven't spent a whole lot of time with any of these, so I'm not totally sure it's ready for prime time yet, but I think it's very cool and very promising.

Movement: This is a pretty easy one. The open source hardware movement (I hope). Open source has been serious business in the software world for a long time, but until recently, the hardware community hasn't jumped on the concept. Now we have Beagleboard, Arduino and a gazillion others. There are even a number of web sites pretty much devoted to open source hardware and related subjects like circuit bending.

My only concern is that the hardware folks may get overwhelmed and go back into hiding. Over on the Beagleboard Google group, though it's supposed to cover both HW and SW, the topics are virtually all software related. A few HW exclusive discussion boards (like chiphacker.com) have popped up and may get traction, but there's a lot of catching up to do.

My honorable mention in the movement department would be the closely related "after hours hardware" community. This includes hobbyists, circuit benders and hackers (of the good sort). I think the barriers to entry to starter hardware development are lower then any time since the early 1980's. That's a good thing. The more people involved in electronics as a hobby, the more we will have heading down that career path and the more new small businesses we will have start up. All a very good thing. Certainly a lot of creativity going on in this arena.

That's all I've got for now. So I'm calling the list closed. Maybe more later. Maybe

Duane Benson

Merry Christmas, Yo, Ho, Ho Green Giant and A Bottle of Rum

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