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Scientists Fabricate Improved Organic Transistor

Mon, 04/27/2009 - 4:51am

Editor's Note: Every step we take towards organic semicondustors is a step towards more highly integrated devices as well. What happens to design when the entire device is made of a monolithic system-on-substrate circuit? Will everything be designed and "assembled" to spec?

 (Physorg.com) - Organic semiconductors are promising building blocks for many devices, from LEDs to transistors, offering potential advantages such as cost-effectiveness, flexibility, and high performance. Currently, most research in organic semiconductors has focused on p-channel semiconductors, which transport positively charged holes, rather than n-channel semiconductors, which transport negatively charged electrons. The choice of semiconductor depends on the application, and many applications require a combination of both types.

However, the few n-channel semiconductors that exist today have performance that lags considerably behind their p-channel counterparts. To address this issue,a team of researchers from Stanford University in the US, the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology in Korea, and Sungkyunkwan University in Korea, has greatly improved the performance of n-channel organic semiconductors in transistors. 

They demonstrate that their transistor achieves the highest mobility for n-channel organic wire transistors known to date, and is comparable with the best p-channel organic wire transistors. Their fabrication method offers controlled alignment and density of the wires, which helps improve the overall device performance.

Click Here for the rest of the article. The picture is of scanning electron microscope images of (left) microwires synthesized using the researchers’ method (inset is the chemical structure of the molecules); and (right) aligned microwires on a substrate (inset is the corresponding optical image). Credit: Oh et al. ©2009 PNAS.

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