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Born of fire

Thu, 06/19/2014 - 4:19pm
Screaming Circuits

There are a lot of places suitable for running an electronics manufacturing plant. Ours is in Oregon, USA – the Silicon Rain forest, if you will. The slower pace of life here, the proximity to recreation and wilderness, the rain soaked green hills; all help to create a healthy and invigorating environment. That’s a healthy environment for those of us that work here and that helps us to deliver dedicated service and quality product on time.

Deep in the woods of Oregon - up at an elevation of about 3000 feet, tucked behind soaring trees in a remote corner of the West-central Cascade foothills lays an alluring, mystifying volcanic remnant, known as Clear Lake.

Snow melt from nearby Mt. Washington and many of its Eastern hillsides, plus a series of complex underground springs, fill it with extremely cold, ultra-pure water. This creates an average temperature in the lake that is so low that comparatively little algae growth, or other biological activity that would otherwise obscure entering sunlight is able to thrive. Scuba divers are drawn to the exceptionally clear waters to see, with their own eyes, the remains of the ancient forest dispersed along its bed, still preserved in frigid stasis from the time the lake was formed.

Clear_Lake_with_Mount_Washington 500Just to stand on the shoreline and gaze into the slowly rippling turquoise-blue waters, which allow for visibility of up to of 100 feet below the surface, can create a dreamlike feeling of wonder in the observer. Don’t get too comfortable, however… because a miles-long sleeping giant who carries the secret of how the lake originally formed rests motionless, just a few miles to the East.

The Sand Mountain Volcanic Field towers another 2000 further vertical feet above Clear Lake’s shoreline, yet is just a few miles away. It is a massive alignment of 23 cinder cones, sitting dormant, interspersed with 42 distinct vents.

Around 3000 years ago, lava eruptions from vents within this volcanic field flowed downhill and blocked a river, drowning its valley. This immense flow of lava formed Clear Lake and created the relic of standing trees still visible in its depths today.

Porous volcanic rock and soils within these hillsides capture snow melt and other moisture for a gigantic naturally occurring filter. It will be an estimated 2-10 years before it reemerges at Great Spring, on the North East end of Clear Lake.

When the lake water exits over the centuries-old lava flow, the lake’s cascading deluge becomes the headwaters of the McKenzie River - and the highest permanent source of its clean, fresh water. The river then flows downhill towards the cities of Springfield and Eugene nearly 75 miles away, providing over 200,000 with their sole source of drinking water.

For 8,000 years – until the early 1800’s – peoples of the Molalla, Sahaptain, Chinook and Kalapuya tribes traveled, hunted, and lived along the McKenzie River. Very little has survived from their culture, but it’s interesting to wonder about what they contemplated when standing on the beautiful shores of Clear Lake, and as they witnessed firsthand the extraordinary events which created it.

You can find this gem for yourself, on Oregon state highway 126 (The McKenzie highway) - just two hours and 20 minutes from your pc boards being assembled at Screaming Circuits. 

Audie Stoehr

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