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“Challenge X” Vehicles Strut Their Stuff In Manhattan

Mon, 05/19/2008 - 6:56am
Alix Paultre

It may have been a cold and damp morning in Manhattan, but that didn’t damp the passions of the participants in the Challenge X national collegiate engineering competition. This year’s challenge, sponsored by the US Department of Energy and General Motors, focuses on technology integration and full-vehicle development of advanced alternate-technology drivetrain and subsystems. By participating in the Challenge X program, the students gain real-world engineering skills and hands-on learning to better prepare them for a future career in engineering.

Challenge X national collegiate

More than 300 students from 17 University teams across the United States were each given a 2005 Chevrolet Equinox to modify and refurbish with their technology, with an emphasis on functionality and consciousness of the well-to-wheel process their fuel of choice takes on its way to the pump. 

challenge x cars

The competition also helps seed the automotive industry with engineers who are committed to advancing vehicle technology to address the energy and transportation challenges of the 21st Century.  Competing powertrain technologies ranged from reformulated gasoline to an ethanol/hydrogen mix and storage covered approaches from Lithium batteries to hydraulic accumulators.

Challenge X national collegiate engineering

Since the competition began in 2004, Hundreds of Challenge X graduates have found jobs with automakers and automotive suppliers.  The teams and their vehicles were on Display at Tavern on the Green in Central Park as part of the first leg in their 350- mile tour from New York City to Washington D.C. to show off the utility and roadworthiness of their advanced vehicle powertrain designs.

Challenge X national collegiate engineering competition

For more information visit the Challenge X website at www.challengex.org.

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