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Controlling magnetism with an electric field

February 19, 2014 11:33 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

There is a big effort in industry to produce electrical devices with more and faster memory and logic. Magnetic memory elements, such as in a hard drive, and in the future in what is called MRAM (magnetic random access memory), use electrical currents to encode information. However, the heat which is generated is a significant problem....

Embarking on geoengineering, then stopping, would speed up global warming

February 19, 2014 11:29 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Spraying reflective particles into the atmosphere to reflect sunlight and then stopping it could exacerbate the problem of climate change, according to new research by atmospheric scientists at the University of Washington. Carrying out geoengineering for several decades and then stopping would cause warming at a rate that will greatly exceed that expected....

CASL, Westinghouse simulate neutron behavior in AP1000 reactor core

February 19, 2014 11:27 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Scientists and engineers developing more accurate approaches to analyzing nuclear power reactors have successfully tested a new suite of computer codes that closely model "neutronics" — the behavior of neutrons in a reactor core. Technical staff at Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, supported by the research team at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)...

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#racism? Study probes slurs found on Twitter

February 19, 2014 11:25 am | by Daniele DeAngelis Walker, Editorial Intern | Blogs | Comments

Is cyber-racism the newest form of cyberbullying? A study performed by the British organization Demos reports that over 10,000 racial slurs are posted on Twitter every day. That means that every 9 seconds or so, a racial slur is tweeted. What’s going on here?

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Artificial leaf jumps developmental hurdle

February 19, 2014 11:22 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

In a recent early online edition of Nature Chemistry, ASU scientists, along with colleagues at Argonne National Laboratory, have reported advances toward perfecting a functional artificial leaf. Designing an artificial leaf that uses solar energy to convert water cheaply and efficiently into hydrogen and oxygen is one of the goals of BISfuel....

Novel sensor system would flag structural weaknesses before bridges and stadiums collapse

February 19, 2014 11:17 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

NJIT will be part of an international team of engineers from universities in the U.S., Canada, and Qatar developing a novel system to detect the onset of structural damage on bridges, stadiums and other large public infrastructure. With a grant of just over $1 million from the government of Qatar, a Persian Gulf nation that has proposed building one of the longest causeways in the world....

Rife with hype, exoplanet study needs patience and refinement

February 19, 2014 11:15 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Imagine someone spent months researching new cities to call home using low-resolution images of unidentified skylines. The pictures were taken from several miles away with a camera intended for portraits, and at sunset. From these fuzzy snapshots, that person claims to know the city's air quality, the appearance of its buildings, and how often it rains.

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Study on methane emissions from natural gas systems indicates new priorities

February 19, 2014 11:13 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A new study published in the journal Science says that the total impact of switching to natural gas depends heavily on leakage of methane (CH4) during the natural gas life cycle, and suggests that more can be done to reduce methane emissions and to improve measurement tools which help inform policy choices.

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HTC to replace cracked phone screens for 6 months in new US offer

February 19, 2014 9:44 am | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

HTC is offering to replace cracked phone screens for six months, saying it wants to address a leading consumer frustration. The offer applies only to HTC One phones bought in the U.S. starting Tuesday. HTC Corp. will replace the screen only once.

App for tracking people's location could be friendship magnet or stalker's best friend

February 19, 2014 9:42 am | by Michael Liedtke, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

SocialRadar is a new mobile application that could become a cool way to find nearby friends and discover other interesting people living or working in the same neighborhood. Or it could just end up being another creepy example of how digital devices are making it easier for our whereabouts to be tracked by just about anyone, including strangers.

Visa, MasterCard introduce Internet-based payment technologies for physical stores

February 19, 2014 9:40 am | by Anick Jesdanun, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Visa and MasterCard are introducing Internet-based technologies to make it easier for shoppers to buy things at retail stores without pulling out a credit card. The two technologies, announced separately on Wednesday, will give merchants and banks more options...

Nitrogen-tracking tools for better crops and less pollution

February 19, 2014 9:19 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

As every gardner knows, nitrogen is crucial for a plant's growth. But nitrogen absorption is inefficient. This means that on the scale of food crops, adding significant levels of nitrogen to the soil through fertilizer presents a number of problems, particularly river and groundwater pollution. As a result, finding a way to improve nitrogen uptake in agricultural products could improve yields....

Researchers propose a better way to make sense of 'Big Data'

February 19, 2014 9:15 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Big Data is everywhere, and we are constantly told that it holds the answers to almost any problem we want to solve. Companies collect information on how we shop, doctors and insurance companies gather our medical test results, and governments compile logs of our phone calls and emails. In each instance, the hope is that critical insights are hidden deep within massive amounts of information....

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Pond-dwelling powerhouse's genome points to its biofuel potential

February 19, 2014 9:13 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Duckweed is a tiny floating plant that's been known to drive people daffy. It's one of the smallest and fastest-growing flowering plants that often becomes a hard-to-control weed in ponds and small lakes. But it's also been exploited to clean contaminated water and as a source to produce pharmaceuticals.

New study reveals communications potential of graphene

February 19, 2014 9:09 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Providing secure wireless connections and improving the efficiency of communication devices could be another application for graphene, as demonstrated by scientists at Queen Mary University of London and the Cambridge Graphene Centre. Often touted as a wonder material, graphene is a one-atom thick layer of carbon....

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