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Digital meter ideal for lab applications

October 1, 2013 3:11 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The Rex DD-4 Digital Durometer is the successor to the popular Rex DD-3. With its impressive list of features, the DD-4 is truly state-of-the-art and is the ideal instrument for lab use. Some of the new features are a new larger LCD display, USB data ports for computer compatibility, a locking feature to prevent accidental erasure of tolerances, automatic shutoff and low battery warning.

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DIY Hacks & How Tos: Pepper's Ghost

October 1, 2013 3:00 pm | Videos | Comments

Pepper's Ghost is a special effects technique for creating transparent ghostly images. This technique has been a staple of theaters and haunted houses since John Pepper popularized it in the 1800s. It works by reflecting an image of the ghost off of a sheet of plexiglass. This special effect is especially impressive because it can be performed live....

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This office-training parody will make you nostalgic for the '80s

October 1, 2013 2:50 pm | by Jason Lomberg, Technical Editor | Blogs | Comments

Ah, the ‘80s ... the Cold War was winding down, Arnold Schwarzenegger was terminating box office receipts, and hokey office-training videos were at their peak. Grasshopper – a company that provides entrepreneurs with virtual phone systems – captured all that and more in their parody/viral marketing campaign, the “Epic 80s Entrepreneur Training Video.”

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'Waviness' explains why carbon nanotube forests have low stiffness

October 1, 2013 1:06 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A new study has found that "waviness" in forests of vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes dramatically reduces their stiffness, answering a long-standing question surrounding the tiny structures. Instead of being a detriment, the waviness may make the nanotube arrays more compliant and therefore useful as thermal interface material for conducting heat away from future high-powered integrated circuits.

CU, MIT breakthrough in photonics could allow for faster and faster electronics

October 1, 2013 1:02 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A pair of breakthroughs in the field of silicon photonics by researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Micron Technology Inc. could allow for the trajectory of exponential improvement in microprocessors that began nearly half a century ago—known as Moore's Law...

Putting a face on a robot

October 1, 2013 12:57 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A new study from the Georgia Institute of Technology finds that older and younger people have varying preferences about what they would want a personal robot to look like. And they change their minds based on what the robot is supposed to do. Participants were shown a series of photos portraying either robotic, human or mixed human-robot faces and were asked to select the one that they would prefer for their robot's appearance.

Delta picks Microsoft for pilot tablets

October 1, 2013 12:47 pm | by JOSHUA FREED, AP Airlines Writer | News | Comments

Delta Air Lines plans to buy 11,000 Microsoft Surface 2 tablets for its pilots to replace the heavy bundles of books and maps they haul around now. Other airlines, including American and United, have been buying Apple's iPad for that purpose. Delta says the Surface tablets will save it $13 million per year in fuel and other costs.

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Review: Gear watch has potential, but falls short

October 1, 2013 12:43 pm | by ANICK JESDANUN, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

It didn't take long to see how a computerized wristwatch might help manage my digital life — or to see how Samsung's new Galaxy Gear smartwatch falls short. First, the potential: Smartwatches are supposed to offer quick access to many of the things you normally do on your phone, such as checking messages, taking photos, checking the weather and answering calls.

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Jellyfish wave shuts down Swedish nuke reactor

October 1, 2013 12:30 pm | by GARY PEACH, Associated Press | News | Comments

It wasn't a tsunami but it had the same effect: A huge cluster of jellyfish forced one of the world's largest nuclear reactors to shut down - a phenomenon that marine biologists say could become more common. Operators of the Oskarshamn nuclear plant in southeastern Sweden had to scramble reactor number three on Sunday after tons of jellyfish clogged the pipes that bring in cool water to the plant's turbines.  

Nuclear engineering researchers revealed fundamentals

October 1, 2013 12:15 pm | by Texas A&M UniversityTexas A&M University | News | Comments

The radiation materials science group led by Dr. Lin Shao, associate professor of nuclear engineering, has made great progress toward understanding the fundamentals of defects in nuclear materials. By using molecular dynamics simulation and the supercomputer facility on campus, the team found a unique mechanism for how grain boundaries in metals remove defects. The knowledge can explain why......

IKEA starts selling solar panels for homes

October 1, 2013 10:22 am | by MALIN RISING, Associated Press | News | Comments

Swedish flat-pack furniture giant IKEA will start selling residential solar panels at its stores in Britain, the first step in its plan to bring renewable energy to the mainstream market worldwide. The company started selling solar panels made by China's Hanergy in its store in Southampton on Monday. It will sell them in the rest of Britain in coming months, it said.

Improving lithium-ion batteries with nanoscale research

October 1, 2013 10:20 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

New research led by an electrical engineer at the University of California, San Diego is aimed at improving lithium-ion batteries through possible new electrode architectures with precise nano-scale designs. The researchers created nanowires that block diffusion of lithium (Li) across their silicon surface and promote layer-by-layer axial lithiation of the nanowire's germanium core.

Entering a new dimension: 4-D printing

October 1, 2013 10:15 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Imagine an automobile coating that changes its structure to adapt to a humid environment or a salt-covered road, better protecting the car from corrosion. Or consider a soldier's uniform that could alter its camouflage or more effectively protect against poison gas or shrapnel upon contact.

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UCLA engineers develop new metabolic pathway to more efficiently convert sugars into biofuels

October 1, 2013 10:13 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

UCLA chemical engineering researchers have created a new synthetic metabolic pathway for breaking down glucose that could lead to a 50 percent increase in the production of biofuels. The new pathway is intended to replace the natural metabolic pathway known as glycolysis, a series of chemical reactions that nearly all organisms use to convert sugars into the molecular precursors that cells need.

Student experiments take flight on Cygnus cargo craft

October 1, 2013 10:10 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Dreaming big may not literally make the world go round, but it can power student curiosities to circle the globe as orbiting science investigations aboard the International Space Station. On Wednesday, Sept. 18, the private commercial space company, Orbital Sciences Corp. of Dulles, Va., launched its test flight Cygnus cargo spacecraft....

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