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Shaping the future of nanocrystals

August 22, 2014 8:52 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The first direct observations of how facets form and develop on platinum nanocubes point the way towards more sophisticated and effective nanocrystal design and reveal that a nearly 150 year-old scientific law describing crystal growth breaks down at the nanoscale....

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Engineering Newswire: Giant darts probe Mars for signs of life

August 22, 2014 8:46 am | by Alex Shanahan, Multimedia Production Specialist | Videos | Comments

There is a new Indiegogo campaign, and it’s mission: To find life on Mars. Explore Mars, Inc. believes that in order to find life on mars, we must look deep beneath the surface instead of just scratching it like we have been with rover bots and cameras....

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Stanford scientists develop a water splitter that runs on an ordinary AAA battery

August 22, 2014 8:42 am | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

In 2015, American consumers will finally be able to purchase fuel cell cars from Toyota and other manufacturers. Although touted as zero-emissions vehicles, most of the cars will run on hydrogen made from natural gas, a fossil fuel that contributes to global warming....

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Part 1, Screaming Circuits and the Maker community

August 22, 2014 8:36 am | by Screaming Circuits | Blogs | Comments

Can Screaming Circuits, a full-service assembly provider, compete with a “no-frills” assembly house? Upon first thought, it might seem like like Screaming Circuits, would be too expensive for anything but well-funded big-business and big-education. In reality, that may not at...

Sunlight, not microbes, key to CO2 in Arctic

August 21, 2014 4:52 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The vast reservoir of carbon stored in Arctic permafrost is gradually being converted to carbon dioxide (CO2) after entering the freshwater system in a process thought to be controlled largely by microbial activity. However, a new study – funded by the National Science Foundation and published this week in the journal Science – concludes that sunlight and not bacteria is the key to triggering the production of CO2....

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Celebrating 100 years of crystallography

August 21, 2014 4:49 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of a revolutionary technique that underpins much of modern science, Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN) magazine last week released a special edition on X-ray crystallography — its past, present and a tantalizing glimpse of its future....

Arctic sea ice influenced force of the Gulf Stream

August 21, 2014 4:47 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

For AWI geologist Juliane Müller the Fram Strait is a key region in the global oceanic circulation. "On the east side of this passage between Greenland and Svalbard warm Atlantic water flows to the north into the Arctic Ocean while on the west side cold Arctic water masses and sea ice push their way out of the Arctic into the North Atlantic....

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Hacking Gmail with 92 percent success

August 21, 2014 4:41 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

A team of researchers, including an assistant professor at the University of California, Riverside Bourns College of Engineering, have identified a weakness believed to exist in Android, Windows and iOS mobile operating systems that could be used to obtain personal information from unsuspecting users....

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USB pen scope displays signals from 5mV to 50V

August 21, 2014 4:27 pm | Saelig Company, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Saelig Company Inc. (Fairport, NY) announces the new Owon RDS1021 Wave Rambler — a new, USB pen scope that packs the features of a high-performance bench top oscilloscope in a small, lightweight and ergonomic probe that fits perfectly in the hand....

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Primary care physicians can be critical resource for abused women in rural areas

August 21, 2014 4:25 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Many primary care physicians in rural communities do not routinely screen women for intimate partner violence (IPV), according to Penn State medical and public health researchers. Rural women who are exposed to such violence have limited resources if they seek help....

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University of Houston receives $3.3 million grant to promote women in STEM fields

August 21, 2014 4:21 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

The University of Houston has received a $3.3 million grant from the National Science Foundation to increase the number of women faculty in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields, as well as to ensure they have opportunities to move into leadership roles....

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Laser device may end pin pricks, improve quality of life for diabetics

August 21, 2014 4:18 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Princeton University researchers have developed a way to use a laser to measure people's blood sugar, and, with more work to shrink the laser system to a portable size, the technique could allow diabetics to check their condition without pricking themselves to draw blood....

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ORNL scientists uncover clues to role of magnetism in iron-based superconductors

August 21, 2014 4:13 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

New measurements of atomic-scale magnetic behavior in iron-based superconductors by researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Vanderbilt University are challenging conventional wisdom about superconductivity and magnetism....

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New CloudLab will help researchers test new cloud architectures

August 21, 2014 4:11 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Computer systems engineers Michael Zink and David Irwin at the University of Massachusetts Amherst recently received a three-year, $390,000 National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to help create a new instrument for the national research community known as a "cloud laboratory"....

Water leads to chemical that gunks up biofuels production

August 21, 2014 4:08 pm | by EurekAlert! | News | Comments

Trying to understand the chemistry that turns plant material into the same energy-rich gasoline and diesel we put in our vehicles, researchers have discovered that water in the conversion process helps form an impurity which, in turn, slows down key chemical reactions. The study, which was reported online ...

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