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A young star's age can be gleamed from nothing but sound waves

July 7, 2014 9:00 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Determining the age of stars has long been a challenge for astronomers. In experiments published in the journal Science, researchers at KU Leuven's Institute for Astronomy show that 'infant' stars can be distinguished from 'adolescent' stars by measuring the acoustic waves they emit....

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Study: Just thinking by yourself isn't much fun

July 7, 2014 8:54 am | by MALCOLM RITTER, AP Science Writer | Comments

Wouldn't you love to escape this busy world and just spend some time alone with your thoughts? Maybe not, says a study of volunteers who actually tried it. Some even started giving themselves electric shocks as the minutes ticked by. "I think many of them were trying to shock themselves out of boredom," said psychologist Timothy Wilson....

Cosmic masquerade: Habitable planet isn't planet

July 7, 2014 8:50 am | by Associated Press | Comments

A new study says a planet outside our solar system thought to be in the so-called Goldilocks zone is not even a real planet, but a cosmic masquerade. Four years ago, scientists proclaimed they found what could be the first planet outside our solar system in the habitable zone around its star....

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Journal expresses 'concern' over Facebook study

July 7, 2014 8:46 am | by Associated Press | Comments

The scientific journal that published a study by Facebook and two U.S. universities examining people's online mood swings regrets how the social experiment was handled. In a note of contrition, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences concluded that the decision to manipulate the content ...

Germany summons US envoy over spy case

July 7, 2014 8:42 am | by GEIR MOULSON, Associated Press | Comments

German-U.S. relations are facing a new test over a German intelligence employee who reportedly spied for the U.S., with Germany's president saying if the allegations are true, that kind of spying on allies must stop. Prosecutors say a 31-year-old German was arrested last week on suspicion of spying for foreign intelligence services....

Photos of the Day: A shark-detecting buoy

July 2, 2014 2:11 pm | by ECN Staff | Comments

The Clever Buoy emits sonar into the surrounding water, and a processor in the buoy analyzes the signals, searching for shark-like signatures. The device is able to distinguish between sharks and friendlier animals like dolphins by analyzing how the object moves through the water....

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Top-5 PV countries account for 80 percent of global PV demand

July 2, 2014 12:17 pm | by DisplaySearch | Comments

The rise of the Chinese and U.S. markets has been occurring steadily over the past few years, with the Chinese market seeing the greater growth in a short period of time, while the U.S. has seen slower, but steadier increases. Now, in the second half of 2014, these two markets are set to reach....

Campus showcases high-performance buildings

July 2, 2014 12:06 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are transforming the way the world uses energy—and those transformations become apparent the moment one sets foot on the NREL campus in Golden, Colorado. Here, research teams have applied their expertise....

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NREL and General Motors announce R&D partnership to reduce cost of automotive fuel cells

July 2, 2014 12:03 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

The Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and General Motors (GM) are partnering on a multiyear, multimillion dollar joint effort to accelerate the reduction of automotive fuel cell stack costs through fuel cell material and manufacturing research and development (R&D)....

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Blind lead the way in brave new world of tactile technology

July 2, 2014 11:37 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Imagine feeling a slimy jellyfish, a prickly cactus or map directions on your iPad mini Retina display, because that's where tactile technology is headed. But you'll need more than just an index finger to feel your way around. New research at UC Berkeley has found that people are better and faster at navigating tactile technology when using both hands and several fingers....

Solar panels light the way from carbon dioxide to fuel

July 2, 2014 11:35 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Research to curb global warming caused by rising levels of atmospheric greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide, usually involves three areas: Developing alternative energy sources, capturing and storing greenhouse gases, and repurposing excess greenhouse gases. Drawing on two of these approaches ...

Army researches the future of 3-D printing

July 2, 2014 10:18 am | by U.S. Army | Comments

One day, Soldiers will get critical repair parts at the point of need through innovative, reliable 3-D printing systems. This vision of the future will lift the logistics burden and lighten the load to provide more capabilities at less cost, according to Army researchers.

New NIST metamaterial gives light a one-way ticket

July 2, 2014 10:07 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

The light-warping structures known as metamaterials have a new trick in their ever-expanding repertoire. Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have built a silver, glass and chromium nanostructure that can all but stop visible light cold in one direction while giving it a pass in the other....

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Nature of solids and liquids explored through new pitch drop experiment

July 2, 2014 10:02 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Physicists at Queen Mary University of London have set up a new pitch drop experiment for students to explore the difference between solid and liquids. Known as the 'world's longest experiment', the set up at the University of Queensland was famous for taking ten years for a drop of pitch – a thick, black, sticky material – to fall from a funnel....

How do ants get around? Ultra-sensitive machines measure their every step…

July 2, 2014 9:59 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

How do ants manage to move so nimbly whilst coordinating three pairs of legs and a behind that weighs up to 60% of their body mass? German scientists have recently developed a device that may reveal the answer. Measuring the forces generated by single limbs is vital to understanding the energetics of animal locomotion....

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