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Scientists get set for simulated nuclear inspection

September 2, 2014 12:37 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Some 40 scientists and technicians from around the world will descend on Jordan in November to take part in a simulated on-site inspection of a suspected nuclear test site on the banks of the Dead Sea. Playing the part of inspectors, the experts will have access to a wide range of sensor technologies to look for signs of whether a nuclear explosion has taken place....

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A new synthetic amino acid for an emerging class of drugs

September 2, 2014 12:35 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

One of the greatest challenges in modern medicine is developing drugs that are highly effective against a target, but with minimal toxicity and side-effects to the patient. Such properties are directly related to the 3D structure of the drug molecule. Ideally, the drug should have a shape that is perfectly complementary to a disease-causing target, so that it binds it with high specificity....

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Why sibling stars look alike: Early, fast mixing in star-birth clouds

September 2, 2014 12:30 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Stars are made mostly of hydrogen and helium, but they also contain trace amounts of other elements, such as carbon, oxygen, iron, and even more exotic substances. By carefully measuring the wavelengths (colors) of light coming from a star, astronomers can determine how abundant each of these trace elements is....

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Accounting for biological aggregation in heating and imaging of magnetic nanoparticles

September 2, 2014 12:09 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Biological aggregation is a critical, yet often overlooked factor in the medical application of nanoparticles. Here we systematically characterize the effects of aggregation on both radiofrequency heating and magnetic resonance image (MRI) contrast of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs), including detailed analysis of the aggregate morphologies based on quasi-fractal descriptions....

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Nature's tiny engineers

September 2, 2014 11:57 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Conventional wisdom has long held that corals — whose calcium-carbonate skeletons form the foundation of coral reefs — are passive organisms that rely entirely on ocean currents to deliver dissolved substances, such as nutrients and oxygen. But now scientists at MIT ...

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Family dinners reduce effects of cyberbullying in adolescents

September 2, 2014 11:54 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Sharing regular family meals with children may help protect them from the effects of cyberbullying, according to a study by McGill professor Frank Elgar, Institute for Health and Social Policy. Because family meal times represent social support and exchanges in the home....

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Ride-sharing could cut cabs' road time by 30 percent

September 2, 2014 11:47 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Cellphone apps that find users car rides in real time are exploding in popularity: The car-service company Uber was recently valued at $18 billion, and even as it faces legal wrangles, a number of companies that provide similar services with licensed taxi cabs have sprung up....

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Single laser stops molecular tumbling motion instantly

September 2, 2014 11:45 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

In the quantum world, making the simple atom behave is one thing, but making the more complex molecule behave is another story. Now Northwestern University scientists have figured out an elegant way to stop a molecule from tumbling so that its potential ...

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Researchers awarded $1.5 million to develop software to process solar astronomy data on larger scale

September 2, 2014 11:43 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Researchers in Georgia State University's new Astroinformatics program have been awarded $1.5 million from the National Science Foundation to develop software tools that can process large sets of solar astronomy data and allow scientists to perform analyses on scales and detail levels that have not been possible....

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Nano-forests to reveal secrets of cells

September 2, 2014 11:40 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Vertical nanowires could be used for detailed studies of what happens on the surface of cells. The findings are important for pharmaceuticals research, among other applications. A group of researchers from Lund University in Sweden have managed to make artificial cell membranes form....

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Monitoring system provides weather intel to help keep the campus community safe

September 2, 2014 11:23 am | by Georgia Institute of Technology | Comments

September 2, 2014 Atlanta, GA The familiar adage, “Everyone talks about the weather, but nobody ever seems to do anything about it,” may hold true for the general population, but for the Georgia Tech Police Department’s Office of Emergency Preparedness (OEP), monitoring campus weather...

Future solar panels

September 2, 2014 11:22 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

The solar panels we see tend to be rigid and black. Organic photovoltaic technology, by contrast, enables more translucent and more flexible solar panels in a range of colours to be manufactured. But this technology needs to meet certain requirements if it is to be accepted....

Google building fleet of package-delivering drones

September 2, 2014 11:19 am | by MICHAEL LIEDTKE, AP Technology Writer | Comments

Google's secretive research laboratory is trying to build a fleet of drones designed to bypass earthbound traffic so packages can be delivered to people more quickly. The ambitious program announced Thursday escalates Google's technological arms race....

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Tesla, Chinese firm plan 400 charging stations

September 2, 2014 11:16 am | by JOE McDONALD, AP Business Writer | Comments

Tesla Motors Co. and a state-owned Chinese phone carrier announced plans Friday to build 400 charging stations for electric cars in a new bid to promote popular adoption of the technology in China. Plans call for China Unicom Ltd. to provide space for construction....

Kris Hauser: Building smarter robots

September 2, 2014 10:20 am | by Duke University | Comments

Kris Hauser, an expert in computer science, informatics and robotics, joined both the electrical and computer engineering department and the mechanical engineering and materials science department in Duke University’s Pratt School of Engineering on August 3, 2014....

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