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Photos of the Day: The Navy’s robo-tuna

July 11, 2014 | by ECN Staff | Comments

The Navy’s robo-tuna, designed by Boston Engineering, is a 4-foot long unmanned undersea vehicle designed to blend in with marine life and perform military functions. This "biometric" autonomous vehicle moves just like a fish, flipping its tail to propel itself....

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Ultra-high-definition TVs make gains but still lack market penetration

July 23, 2014 11:54 am | Comments

Ultra-high-definition televisions (UHD TVs) continued to make slow and steady inroads throughout the world, but their share of the overall flat-panel TV market remained minimal by the end of May, suggesting that UHD TV pricing in the market remains too high to gain meaningful share, according to a new report from IHS Technology....

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Fill 'er up: NIST develops prototype meter test for hydrogen refueling stations

July 23, 2014 7:18 am | by EurekAlert! | Comments

To support the fair sale of gaseous hydrogen as a vehicle fuel, researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a prototype field test standard to test the accuracy of hydrogen fuel dispensers. Once the standard is field tested, it will serve as a model for constructing similar devices....

Ultra high definition TVs boost LG Display profit

July 23, 2014 3:15 am | by The Associated Press | Comments

LG Display Co. says its earnings for the April-June quarter more than doubled thanks to improved demand for ultra-high-definition TVs. The South Korean display panel maker said Wednesday its net income reached 256 billion won ($250 million), compared with 105 billion won a year earlier. Analysts...

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Target debuts an image-recognition shopping app

July 22, 2014 10:15 pm | by The Associated Press | Comments

Target is introducing an app that lets users purchase items after scanning magazine ads with their smartphones. It's the latest offering from retailers looking to boost sales with the use of improving image-recognition technology. Starting this month, the app, called "In a Snap," will recognize...

Protect yourself from identity theft

July 22, 2014 10:15 pm | by The Associated Press | Comments

It's an almost weekly occurrence: On Tuesday, Goodwill said its computer systems may have been hacked, leading to the possible theft of customers' credit and debit card information. The nonprofit agency, which operates 2,900 stores in the U.S., said it is working with federal investigators to look...

Review: Amazon Fire offers new ways to use phones

July 22, 2014 10:15 pm | by Anick Jesdanun - AP Technology Writer - Associated Press | Comments

What I find fascinating about Amazon's Fire phone isn't the gizmos such as the 3-D imagery or the camera scanner that helps you get more information about products. Rather, I like that Amazon is thinking a lot about how phones ought to work. The iPhone and its Android smartphone rivals are so...

Study in 'Science' finds missing piece of biogeochemical puzzle in aquifer

July 22, 2014 9:21 pm | by Georgia Institute of Technology

A study published in Scienceby researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory and co-authored by Georgia Tech may dramatically shift our understanding of the complex dance of microbes and minerals that takes place in aquifers deep underground....

Penn study: Understanding graphene's electrical properties on an atomic level

July 22, 2014 4:36 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Graphene, a material that consists of a lattice of carbon atoms, one atom thick, is widely touted as being the most electrically conductive material ever studied. However, not all graphene is the same. With so few atoms comprising the entirety of the material, the arrangement of each one has an impact on its overall function....

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X-ray irradiation at a certain dose alters the neuronal cytoskeleton and cytomechanics

July 22, 2014 4:28 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Cranial radiotherapy is one of the most important therapeutic methods for the treatment of various types of primary and metastatic brain tumors. Although conventional photon irradiation has significantly improved the treatment of cancer, the central nervous system is prone to damage after high-dose irradiation....

Self-cooling solar cells boost power, last longer

July 22, 2014 4:24 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Scientists may have overcome one of the major hurdles in developing high-efficiency, long-lasting solar cells—keeping them cool, even in the blistering heat of the noonday Sun. By adding a specially patterned layer of silica glass to the surface of ordinary solar cells ...

A new multi-bit 'spin' for MRAM storage

July 22, 2014 4:12 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Interest in magnetic random access memory (MRAM) is escalating, thanks to demand for fast, low-cost, nonvolatile, low-consumption, secure memory devices. MRAM, which relies on manipulating the magnetization of materials for data storage rather than electronic charges....

Fly-inspired sound detector

July 22, 2014 4:08 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Even within a phylum so full of mean little creatures, the yellow-colored Ormia ochracea fly is distinguished among other arthropods for its cruelty -- at least to crickets. Native to the southeastern U.S. states and Central America, the fly is a most predatory sort of parasite....

The evolution of airplanes

July 22, 2014 3:39 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

One of the traditional arguments against Darwinian evolution has been that no one can confirm the process exists because it occurs on a time scale immensely greater than a human lifetime. Adrian Bejan, the J. A. Jones Distinguished Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Duke University, has disagreed with that notion ever since 1996....

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Quantum leap in lasers at Dartmouth brightens future for quantum computing

July 22, 2014 2:55 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Dartmouth scientists and their colleagues have devised a breakthrough laser that uses a single artificial atom to generate and emit particles of light. The laser may play a crucial role in the development of quantum computers, which are predicted to eventually outperform today's most powerful supercomputers....

Technique simplifies the creation of high-tech crystals

July 22, 2014 2:42 pm | by EurekAlert! | Comments

Highly purified crystals that split light with uncanny precision are key parts of high-powered lenses, specialized optics and, potentially, computers that manipulate light instead of electricity. But producing these crystals by current techniques, such as etching them with a precise beam of electrons, is often extremely difficult and expensive....

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